Petition to the King

petitioned the kingPetition to the King (1774)petitioned Parliamentpetitioned the British monarch
The Petition to the King was a petition sent to King George III by the First Continental Congress in 1774, calling for repeal of the Intolerable Acts.wikipedia
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First Continental Congress

FirstContinental Congress1st Continental Congress
The Petition to the King was a petition sent to King George III by the First Continental Congress in 1774, calling for repeal of the Intolerable Acts. On October 1, 1774, in response to the deteriorating relationship between the American Colonies and Britain, the First Continental Congress decided to prepare a statement to King George III of Great Britain.
They ultimately agreed to impose an economic boycott on British trade, and they drew up a Petition to the King pleading for redress of their grievances and repeal of the Intolerable Acts.

Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea PartyTea Partytea was thrown into the harbor
After colonists destroyed thousands of pounds of British-taxed tea during the Boston Tea Party, Parliament passed the Coercive Acts in 1774, punishing the colonies for their actions.
Colonists up and down the Thirteen Colonies in turn responded to the Intolerable Acts with additional acts of protest, and by convening the First Continental Congress, which petitioned the British monarch for repeal of the acts and coordinated colonial resistance to them.

Continental Congress

CongressContinental CongressmanDelegate to the Continental Congress
These punitive Acts were vehemently opposed by the colonists, leading the newly formed Continental Congress to seek redress with King George III, in an attempt to reach a common understanding.
During the congress, delegates organized an economic boycott of Great Britain in protest and petitioned the King for a redress of grievances.

George Read (American politician, born 1733)

George ReadGeorge Read (U.S. statesman)Read
Read was one of only two statesmen who signed all three of the great State papers on which the country's history is based: the original Petition to the King of the Congress of 1774, the Declaration of Independence, and the Constitution of the United States.

John De Hart

While he supported the non-importation agreement and the first petition to the King, he was in favor of reconciliation.

Quebec Act

Quebec Act of 1774Province of QuebecQuebec Act, 1774
The First Continental Congress petitioned Parliament to repeal the Intolerable Acts, which Parliament declined to do.

John Dickinson

Dickinson[John] DickinsonJohn Dickinson (delegate)
Three drafts of the Petition to the King survive to this day: one written by Patrick Henry, one written by Henry Lee, and one by John Dickinson.
As a member of the First Continental Congress, where he was a signee to the Continental Association, Dickinson drafted most of the 1774 Petition to the King, and then, as a member of the Second Continental Congress, wrote the 1775 Olive Branch Petition.

Benjamin Harrison V

Benjamin HarrisonBenjamin Harrison, V[Benjamin] Harrison
The First Congress concluded in October with finalization of a Petition to the King, which was signed by all delegates including Harrison, requesting the King's attention to the colonies' grievances and restoration of harmony with the crown.

Petition

petitionsmemorialpetitioned
The Petition to the King was a petition sent to King George III by the First Continental Congress in 1774, calling for repeal of the Intolerable Acts.

George III of the United Kingdom

George IIIKing George IIIGeorge III of Great Britain
The Petition to the King was a petition sent to King George III by the First Continental Congress in 1774, calling for repeal of the Intolerable Acts. On October 1, 1774, in response to the deteriorating relationship between the American Colonies and Britain, the First Continental Congress decided to prepare a statement to King George III of Great Britain.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
Following the end of the French and Indian War (the North American theater of the Seven Years' War) in 1763, relations between the colonies and Britain had been deteriorating.

Seven Years' War

Seven Years’ WarSeven Years WarThe Seven Years' War
Following the end of the French and Indian War (the North American theater of the Seven Years' War) in 1763, relations between the colonies and Britain had been deteriorating.

Parliament of Great Britain

ParliamentBritish ParliamentGreat Britain
Because the war had plunged the British government deep into debt, Parliament enacted a series of measures to increase tax revenue from the colonies.

Stamp act

Stamps Act 1694Stamp Act 1765Stamp Act 1870
These acts, such as the Stamp Act of 1765 and the Townshend Acts of 1767, were seen as legitimate means of collecting revenues to pay off the nearly two-fold increase in British debt stemming from the war.

Townshend Acts

Townsend ActsTownshend ActTownshend duties
These acts, such as the Stamp Act of 1765 and the Townshend Acts of 1767, were seen as legitimate means of collecting revenues to pay off the nearly two-fold increase in British debt stemming from the war.

Intolerable Acts

Coercive Actsactsamong other actions
The Petition to the King was a petition sent to King George III by the First Continental Congress in 1774, calling for repeal of the Intolerable Acts. After colonists destroyed thousands of pounds of British-taxed tea during the Boston Tea Party, Parliament passed the Coercive Acts in 1774, punishing the colonies for their actions. The goal of the address was to persuade the King to revoke unpopular policies such as the Coercive Acts, which were imposed on the Colonies by the British Parliament.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
On October 1, 1774, in response to the deteriorating relationship between the American Colonies and Britain, the First Continental Congress decided to prepare a statement to King George III of Great Britain.

Parliament

parliamentary governmentparliamentslegislative assembly
The goal of the address was to persuade the King to revoke unpopular policies such as the Coercive Acts, which were imposed on the Colonies by the British Parliament.

Richard Henry Lee

Richard LeeFrancis Lightfoot Lee IILee
Three drafts of the Petition to the King survive to this day: one written by Patrick Henry, one written by Henry Lee, and one by John Dickinson. The committee appointed to prepare the Address consisted of Richard Henry Lee, John Adams, Thomas Johnson, Patrick Henry, and John Rutledge, with Lee designated as the committee chairman.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
The committee appointed to prepare the Address consisted of Richard Henry Lee, John Adams, Thomas Johnson, Patrick Henry, and John Rutledge, with Lee designated as the committee chairman.

Thomas Johnson (jurist)

Thomas JohnsonThomasTh. Johnson Jun r
The committee appointed to prepare the Address consisted of Richard Henry Lee, John Adams, Thomas Johnson, Patrick Henry, and John Rutledge, with Lee designated as the committee chairman.

Patrick Henry

American patriotPatrick Henry, Junrthat revolutionary patriot
Three drafts of the Petition to the King survive to this day: one written by Patrick Henry, one written by Henry Lee, and one by John Dickinson. The committee appointed to prepare the Address consisted of Richard Henry Lee, John Adams, Thomas Johnson, Patrick Henry, and John Rutledge, with Lee designated as the committee chairman.

John Rutledge

JohnRutledge, John
The committee appointed to prepare the Address consisted of Richard Henry Lee, John Adams, Thomas Johnson, Patrick Henry, and John Rutledge, with Lee designated as the committee chairman.