Pevensey Castle

Pevenseycastle of Pevensey at PevenseycastlePevensey Fort
Pevensey Castle is a medieval castle and former Roman Saxon Shore fort at Pevensey in the English county of East Sussex.wikipedia
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Anderitum

AnderidaPevenseyPevensey Roman Fort
Built around 290 AD and known to the Romans as Anderitum, the fort appears to have been the base for a fleet called the Classis Anderidaensis.
The site decayed to become the archetypal ruinous medieval castle, Pevensey Castle, which is surrounded by a small moat, large green — and unusually substantial Roman defensive walls on three sides.

East Sussex

EastSussexCounty of East Sussex
Pevensey Castle is a medieval castle and former Roman Saxon Shore fort at Pevensey in the English county of East Sussex.
There are castles at Bodiam, Herstmonceux, Lewes and Pevensey; and defence works such as the Martello towers and Eastbourne Redoubt.

Westham

Stone CrossHankham
Castle Road (the B2191) curves around the Roman north wall and connects Pevensey to the nearby village of Westham.
Its name derives from being a hamlet to the west of Pevensey Castle.

Saxon Shore

Saxon Shore fortsSaxon Shore FortLitus Saxonicum
Pevensey Castle is a medieval castle and former Roman Saxon Shore fort at Pevensey in the English county of East Sussex.

Charles Dawson

P. dawsoni
It is suspected that Charles Dawson, who has been blamed for the Piltdown Man hoax, was the author of the forged tiles.
He later found faked evidence for the final phases of Roman occupation in Britain at Pevensey Castle in Sussex.

Rape (county subdivision)

Raperapesa county subdivision
The existing tenurial arrangements in the county were swept away and replaced by five subdivisions, or rapes, each of which was given to one of William's most important followers.
The castles of Arundel, Bramber and Lewes were sited on positions overlooking the rivers Arun, Adur and Ouse respectively, while those at Chichester, Hastings and Pevensey overlooked the coast.

Ælle of Sussex

ÆlleAelleAelle of Sussex
In 491, the Chronicle records that the Saxons Aelle and Cissa "besieged Andredadsceaster and slew all the inhabitants; there was not even one Briton left there."

Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke

Gilbert de ClareGilbertGilbert de Claire
It was subsequently re-granted to Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who switched his allegiance to Stephen's cousin and rival, the Empress Matilda, in 1141.
King Stephen created him Earl of Pembroke, and gave him the rape and castle of Pevensey.

Joan of Navarre, Queen of England

Joan of NavarreJoanna of NavarreQueen Joan
Henry IV's second wife Joan of Navarre was imprisoned by Joan's stepson Henry V on charges of plotting to kill him through witchcraft; she was held at Pevensey between December 1419 and March 1420 before being moved to Leeds Castle and eventually released in 1422.
Her large fortune was confiscated and she was imprisoned at Pevensey Castle in Sussex and later at Leeds Castle in Kent.

Castles in Great Britain and Ireland

artillery towerCastles in EnglandCastles in the United Kingdom
Many castles were built close to inland river ports and those built on the coast were usually located at the mouths of rivers or in ports, Pevensey and Portchester being rare exceptions.

Rebellion of 1088

in alliance with other magnatesrebellionrebellion against King William Rufus
The Norman castle's defences were put to the test for the first time in the Rebellion of 1088, when Norman barons allied with Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy rebelled against the new king William Rufus.
In a six-week siege of Pevensey Castle in Sussex he captured the rebel leader Odo.

Peter II, Count of Savoy

Peter II of SavoyPeter of SavoyPeter II
Exactly when this happened is unclear, but it may have been under Peter of Savoy, the Earl of Richmond, who was granted the castle by Henry III in 1246.
In 1246, the king granted Peter the castle of Pevensey.

Edward, 2nd Duke of York

Edward of Norwich, 2nd Duke of YorkEdward of NorwichEdward, Duke of York
Its inmates included King James I of Scotland, who was captured while en route to France in 1405, and Edward of Norwich, 2nd Duke of York, who was held at Pevensey after becoming involved in a plot against Henry IV.
He was arrested and imprisoned for 17 weeks at Pevensey Castle, after which he petitioned for release, and by October was gradually being returned to favour.

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval Europe
Pevensey Castle is a medieval castle and former Roman Saxon Shore fort at Pevensey in the English county of East Sussex.

Castle

castlesMedieval castlefortification
Pevensey Castle is a medieval castle and former Roman Saxon Shore fort at Pevensey in the English county of East Sussex.

Roman Empire

RomanRomansEmpire
Pevensey Castle is a medieval castle and former Roman Saxon Shore fort at Pevensey in the English county of East Sussex.

Scheduled monument

Scheduled Ancient Monumentscheduledscheduled monuments
The site is a Scheduled Monument in the care of English Heritage and is open to visitors.

English Heritage

EHAncient Monuments BoardEnglish Heritage Trust
The site is a Scheduled Monument in the care of English Heritage and is open to visitors.

Gaul

GallicGalliaGallia Comata
The reasons for its construction are unclear; long thought to have been part of a Roman defensive system to guard the British and Gallic coasts against Saxon pirates, it has more recently been suggested that Anderitum and the other Saxon Shore forts were built by a usurper in an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to prevent Rome from reimposing its control over Britain.

Saxons

SaxonSassenachSaxon people
The reasons for its construction are unclear; long thought to have been part of a Roman defensive system to guard the British and Gallic coasts against Saxon pirates, it has more recently been suggested that Anderitum and the other Saxon Shore forts were built by a usurper in an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to prevent Rome from reimposing its control over Britain.

Roman Britain

RomanBritainBritannia
Anderitum fell into ruin following the end of the Roman occupation but was reoccupied in 1066 by the Normans, for whom it became a key strategic bulwark.

Normans

NormanNorman timesAnglo-Norman
Anderitum fell into ruin following the end of the Roman occupation but was reoccupied in 1066 by the Normans, for whom it became a key strategic bulwark.

Keep

donjonmastiocastle keep
A stone keep and fortification was built within the Roman walls and faced several sieges.

Siege

besiegedsiege warfarebesiege
A stone keep and fortification was built within the Roman walls and faced several sieges.