Pharaoh's daughter (Exodus)

Pharaoh's daughterBatyaBithiahBithiaBithiah (Pharaoh's daughter)daughter of Pharaoh
According to the Book of Exodus, Pharaoh's daughter ( bath-parʿōh; ἡ θυγάτηρ Φαραὼ hē thugátēr Pharaṑ) saved the infant Moses from extermination under the oppression of her father, after finding Moses hidden in the rushes on the banks of the Nile in Egypt.wikipedia
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Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
According to the Book of Exodus, Pharaoh's daughter ( bath-parʿōh; ἡ θυγάτηρ Φαραὼ hē thugátēr Pharaṑ) saved the infant Moses from extermination under the oppression of her father, after finding Moses hidden in the rushes on the banks of the Nile in Egypt.
Through the Pharaoh's daughter (identified as Queen Bithia in the Midrash), the child was adopted as a foundling from the Nile river and grew up with the Egyptian royal family.

Finding of Moses

cast adriftfinding Moses hidden in the rushesraised by
According to the Book of Exodus, Pharaoh's daughter ( bath-parʿōh; ἡ θυγάτηρ Φαραὼ hē thugátēr Pharaṑ) saved the infant Moses from extermination under the oppression of her father, after finding Moses hidden in the rushes on the banks of the Nile in Egypt.
The Finding of Moses, sometimes called Moses in the Bullrushes, Moses Saved from the Waters, or other variants, is the story in chapter 2 of the Book of Exodus in the Hebrew Bible of the finding in the River Nile of Moses as a baby by the daughter of Pharaoh.

Book of Exodus

ExodusEx.Shemot
According to the Book of Exodus, Pharaoh's daughter ( bath-parʿōh; ἡ θυγάτηρ Φαραὼ hē thugátēr Pharaṑ) saved the infant Moses from extermination under the oppression of her father, after finding Moses hidden in the rushes on the banks of the Nile in Egypt.
The Pharaoh's daughter finds the child, names him Moses, and brings him up as her own.

Mered

She is mentioned in I Chron 4:18, as being the wife of Mered from the tribe of Judah.
Mered is a biblical character, who was from the Tribe of Judah and noted as the husband of Bithiah, daughter of Pharaoh.

Eshtemoa

Eshtemo'a
Her children were Miriam, Shammai, and Ishbah (the father of Eshtemoa).
A descendent of Bithiah princess of Egypt and Mered (1 Chron. 4:19)

Wet nurse

wetnursenursewet nursing
Pharaoh changed his mind, and Moses's biological mother was appointed a wet nurse in the palace until he grew up. When Moses preached the true faith, Asiya believed in him, provoking the Pharaoh to persecute her.
(Genesis 35:8.) Midrashic commentaries on the Torah hold that the Egyptian princess Bithiah (Pharaoh's wife Asiya in the Islamic Hadith and Qur'an) attempted to wet-nurse Moses, but he would take only his biological mother's milk.

The Ten Commandments (1956 film)

The Ten CommandmentsTen Commandments1956
In the 1956 American film The Ten Commandments, where she is portrayed by Nina Foch, she is called Bithiah and is depicted as the daughter of Ramesses I and sister of the Egyptian pharaoh, Seti I, who raised Moses as her own son as her husband had died before they could have children.
The film stars Charlton Heston in the lead role, Yul Brynner as Rameses, Anne Baxter as Nefretiri, Edward G. Robinson as Dathan, Yvonne De Carlo as Sephora, Debra Paget as Lilia, and John Derek as Joshua; and features Sir Cedric Hardwicke as Sethi, Nina Foch as Bithiah, Martha Scott as Yoshebel, Judith Anderson as Memnet, and Vincent Price as Baka, among others.

Nina Foch

In the 1956 American film The Ten Commandments, where she is portrayed by Nina Foch, she is called Bithiah and is depicted as the daughter of Ramesses I and sister of the Egyptian pharaoh, Seti I, who raised Moses as her own son as her husband had died before they could have children.
Foch appeared in Scaramouche (1952) as Marie Antoinette, and in Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments (1956) as Bithiah, the pharaoh's daughter, who finds the infant Moses in the bulrushes, adopts him as her son, and joins him and the Hebrews in their exodus from Egypt.

Moses in rabbinic literature

Moses in rabbinic literature
Then God sent a fierce heat upon Egypt, and Pharaoh's daughter Bithiah, who was afflicted with leprosy, went to bathe in the river.

Seti I

Pharaoh SetiPharaoh Seti ISethi
In the 1956 American film The Ten Commandments, where she is portrayed by Nina Foch, she is called Bithiah and is depicted as the daughter of Ramesses I and sister of the Egyptian pharaoh, Seti I, who raised Moses as her own son as her husband had died before they could have children.
Seti I was portrayed as the father of Rameses II and adopted uncle of Moses by actor Sir Cedric Hardwicke in the 1956 film The Ten Commandments. In the film, Seti I banishes Moses from Egypt, putting Moses on the path that eventually leads to his return to Egypt and liberation of the slaves after Rameses II ascends the throne. The film establishes the Biblical figure of Bithia (adopted mother of Moses) as Seti's sister.

Asiya

Āsiyá bint Muzāḥim
In the Hadith, Pharaoh's daughter is known as Asiya, one of four of "the best of women".
Bithiah

Ramesses I

RamessesParamessuRameses I
In the 1956 American film The Ten Commandments, where she is portrayed by Nina Foch, she is called Bithiah and is depicted as the daughter of Ramesses I and sister of the Egyptian pharaoh, Seti I, who raised Moses as her own son as her husband had died before they could have children.
The 1956 motion picture The Ten Commandments, directed by Cecil B. DeMille, depicts Rameses I (portrayed by Ian Keith) as the pharaoh who orders the elimination of the first-born of every Hebrew slave family in Egypt, leading to the scenario of future prophet Moses being sheltered by Bithiah, who in the film is said to be the daughter of Rameses I and sister of Seti I.

Tuya (queen)

TuyaQueen Tuya(Mut-)Tuya
In the 1998 Dreamworks animated epic The Prince of Egypt, the character is named Queen Tuya, historically the consort of Seti I. She was voiced by Helen Mirren, with Linda Dee Shayne providing her singing voice.
Queen Tuya has been first portrayed by actress Irene Martin in Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments, as one of Bithiah's maidservants famous for quoting "Bithiah could charm tears from a crocodile".

Entering Heaven alive

ascensionassumptionascended
Entering Heaven alive
Bithiah, the daughter of Pharaoh

Pharaohs in the Bible

PharaohEgyptian PharaohFir‘awn
According to the Book of Exodus, Pharaoh's daughter ( bath-parʿōh; ἡ θυγάτηρ Φαραὼ hē thugátēr Pharaṑ) saved the infant Moses from extermination under the oppression of her father, after finding Moses hidden in the rushes on the banks of the Nile in Egypt.

Nile

Nile RiverNile ValleyRiver Nile
According to the Book of Exodus, Pharaoh's daughter ( bath-parʿōh; ἡ θυγάτηρ Φαραὼ hē thugátēr Pharaṑ) saved the infant Moses from extermination under the oppression of her father, after finding Moses hidden in the rushes on the banks of the Nile in Egypt.

Ancient Egypt

EgyptEgyptianEgyptians
According to the Book of Exodus, Pharaoh's daughter ( bath-parʿōh; ἡ θυγάτηρ Φαραὼ hē thugátēr Pharaṑ) saved the infant Moses from extermination under the oppression of her father, after finding Moses hidden in the rushes on the banks of the Nile in Egypt.

Bible

biblicalScripturethe Bible
In the canonical books of the Bible, the daughter of Pharaoh who rescued Moses is not named.

Josephus

Flavius JosephusTitus Flavius JosephusJosephus’s
In the works of Josephus, the princess who saved Moses from the Nile is called Thermuthis.

Jah

Yah-iahGod
A daughter of Pharaoh named Bithiah ( Biṯyāh, Bityá, literally "daughter of Yah(weh)" or "daughter of the ") is mentioned in the Bible in 1 Chronicles.

Books of Chronicles

1 ChroniclesChronicles2 Chronicles
She is mentioned in I Chron 4:18, as being the wife of Mered from the tribe of Judah.

Midrash

midrashimmidrashicMidrash Rabbah
The Jewish Midrash identifies this Bithiah as the Pharaoh's daughter of Exodus.

Leviticus Rabbah

Midrash Vayikra RabbaVayikrah RabbahVayyiqra Rabba
According to the Midrash, she received her name for having taken Moses in as her own son, for which the is said to have said he would take her in and call her "the 's daughter", the literal meaning of Bithiah (Leviticus Rabbah 1:3).

Caleb

AzubahCaleb (Kaleb)Caleb ben Yefune
Her husband Mered identified in the Midrash as being Caleb, one of the Twelve Spies.

The Twelve Spies

twelve spiesdue to reports from spiesIsraelite spies
Her husband Mered identified in the Midrash as being Caleb, one of the Twelve Spies.