Philanthropy

philanthropistphilanthropicphilanthropistsphilanthropic organizationphilanthropic organizationsphilanthropic workphilanthropicallyphilanthropiesphilanthropic effortsphilanthropism
Philanthropy means the love of humanity.wikipedia
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List of philanthropists

philanthropistPhilanthropists
A person who practices philanthropy is called a philanthropist.
A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; donating his or her time, money, and/or reputation to charitable causes.

Foundling Hospital

Foundling Hospital of ParisLondon Foundling HospitalFounding Hospital
In 1739, Thomas Coram, appalled by the number of abandoned children living on the streets of London, received a royal charter to establish the Foundling Hospital to look after these unwanted orphans in Lamb's Conduit Fields, Bloomsbury.
The Foundling Hospital in London, England, was founded in 1739 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram.

Jonas Hanway

Jonas Hanway, another notable philanthropist of the era, established The Marine Society in 1756 as the first seafarer's charity, in a bid to aid the recruitment of men to the navy.
Jonas Hanway (12 August 1712 – 5 September 1786), was an English traveller and philanthropist.

William Wilberforce

WilberforceWilliam(William) Wilberforce
Philanthropists, such as anti-slavery campaigner William Wilberforce, began to adopt active campaigning roles, where they would champion a cause and lobby the government for legislative change.
William Wilberforce (24 August 1759 – 29 July 1833) was a British politician, philanthropist, and a leader of the movement to abolish the slave trade.

Model dwellings company

model dwellingsModel Dwellings Companiesmodel dwelling
This included the promotion of allotment of land to labourers for "cottage husbandry" that later became the allotment movement, and in 1844 it became the first Model Dwellings Company—an organization that sought to improve the housing conditions of the working classes by building new homes for them, while at the same time receiving a competitive rate of return on any investment.
The principle of philanthropic intention with capitalist return was given the label "five per cent philanthropy".

The Marine Society

Marine SocietyHibernian Marine Society
Jonas Hanway, another notable philanthropist of the era, established The Marine Society in 1756 as the first seafarer's charity, in a bid to aid the recruitment of men to the navy.
Jonas Hanway (1712–1786), who had already made his mark as a traveller, Russia Company merchant, writer and philanthropist, must take the chief credit for founding the society which both contributed to the solution of that particular problem, and has continued for the next two and a half centuries to assist many thousands of young people in preparing for a career at sea.

Housing association

housing associationsRegistered Social Landlordhousing trust
This was one of the first housing associations, a philanthropic endeavor that flourished in the second half of the nineteenth century, brought about by the growth of the middle class.
Housing associations first appeared in the second half of the nineteenth century as part of the growth in philanthropic and voluntary organisations brought about by the growth of the middle classes in the wake of the Industrial Revolution.

Charity Organization Society

Charity Organisation SocietyAssociated CharitiesCharity Organization Societies
In 1869 they set up the Charity Organisation Society.
Charity Organization Societies were made up of charitable groups that used scientific philanthropy to help poor, distressed or deviant persons.

George Peabody

George Peabody & CompanyPeabody EstatesPeabody, George
George Peabody (1795–1869) is the acknowledged father of modern philanthropy.
He is widely regarded as the father of modern philanthropy.

Andrew Carnegie

CarnegieCarnegiesCarnegie family
Andrew Carnegie (1835–1919) was the most influential leader of philanthropy on a national (rather than local) scale.
Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist.

Julius Rosenwald

Rosenwald
Other prominent American philanthropists of the early 20th century included John D. Rockefeller, Julius Rosenwald (1862–1932) and Margaret Olivia Slocum Sage (1828–1918).
Julius Rosenwald (August 12, 1862 – January 6, 1932) was an American businessman and philanthropist.

Charity (practice)

charitycharitablecharitable work
Philanthropy has distinguishing characteristics separate from charity; not all charity is philanthropy, or vice versa, though there is a recognized degree of overlap in practice.

Carnegie Corporation of New York

Carnegie CorporationCarnegie FoundationCarnegie Fellowship
His final and largest project was the Carnegie Corporation of New York, founded in 1911 with a $25 million endowment, later enlarged to $135 million.
But ten years after he sold the Carnegie Steel Company, more than $150 million remained in his accounts and at 76, he wearied of philanthropic choices.

Thomas Coram

Captain CoramCaptain Thomas CoramCoram
In 1739, Thomas Coram, appalled by the number of abandoned children living on the streets of London, received a royal charter to establish the Foundling Hospital to look after these unwanted orphans in Lamb's Conduit Fields, Bloomsbury.

Philanthrocapitalism

Philanthrocapitalism differs from traditional philanthropy in how it operates.
Philanthrocapitalism is a way of doing philanthropy, which mirrors the way that business is done in the for-profit world.

Charitable organization

charityregistered charitycharities
A charitable organization or charity is a non-profit organization whose primary objectives are philanthropy and social well-being (e.g. educational, religious, or other activities serving the public interest or common good).

Impact investing

impact investmentimpact investorimpact venture investor
Traditional philanthropy and impact investment can be distinguished by how they serve society.
Historically, regulation—and to a lesser extent, philanthropy—was an attempt to minimize the negative social consequences (unintended consequences, externalities) of business activities.

John D. Rockefeller Jr.

John D. Rockefeller, Jr.RockefellerJohn Davison Rockefeller Jr.
Rockefeller (1839–1937) retired from business in the 1890s; he and his son John D. Rockefeller Jr. (1874–1960) made large-scale national philanthropy systematic, especially with regard to the study and application of modern medicine, higher education and scientific research.
Rockefeller was known for his philanthropy, giving over $537 million to myriad causes over his lifetime compared to $240 million to his own family.

Venture philanthropy

venture philanthropistventure philanthropiesventure philanthropists
Venture philanthropy is a type of impact investment that takes concepts and techniques from venture capital finance and business management and applies them to achieving philanthropic goals.

Visiting the sick

Visiting the sick, either at hospital or their home, is a recommended philanthropic deed in different cultures and religions, including Christianity, Judaism and Islam and is considered an aspect of benevolence and a work of mercy.

Globalization

globalisationglobalizedglobal
Almost every SDG is linked to environmental protection and sustainability because of raising concerns about how globalisation, liberal consumerism and population growth may affect the environment.
Philanthropic organizations with global missions are also coming to the forefront of humanitarian efforts; charities such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Accion International, the Acumen Fund (now Acumen) and the Echoing Green have combined the business model with philanthropy, giving rise to business organizations such as the Global Philanthropy Group and new associations of philanthropists such as the Global Philanthropy Forum.

Foundation (nonprofit)

foundationcharitable foundationfoundations
They collectively comprise a large asset base for philanthropy

Rockefeller Foundation

Rockefeller FellowshipRockefellerThe Rockefeller Foundation
By 1920, the Rockefeller Foundation was opening offices in Europe.

Love

Christian loveloving
Philanthropy means the love of humanity.

Human

humanshuman beinghuman beings
Philanthropy means the love of humanity.