Philip Johnson

Philip C. JohnsonJohnsonPhillip Johnson[Philip] JohnsonPhilip Cortelyou Johnson
Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) was an American architect.wikipedia
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Postmodern architecture

postmodernPostmodernismpost-modern
He is best known for his works of Modern architecture, including the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, and his works of postmodern architecture, particularly 550 Madison Avenue which was designed for AT&T, and 190 South La Salle Street in Chicago.
The style flourished from the 1980s through the 1990s, particularly in the work of Scott Brown & Venturi, Philip Johnson, Charles Moore and Michael Graves.

Glass House

Philip Johnson's ResidenceThe Glass House
He is best known for his works of Modern architecture, including the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, and his works of postmodern architecture, particularly 550 Madison Avenue which was designed for AT&T, and 190 South La Salle Street in Chicago.
Built in 1948-49, it was designed by Philip Johnson as his own residence, and "universally viewed as having been derived from" the Farnsworth House design, according to Alice T. Friedman.

550 Madison Avenue

AT&T BuildingSony BuildingSony Wonder Technology Lab
He is best known for his works of Modern architecture, including the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, and his works of postmodern architecture, particularly 550 Madison Avenue which was designed for AT&T, and 190 South La Salle Street in Chicago.
Designed by Philip Johnson, it was formerly the headquarters of Sony Corporation of America.

Pritzker Architecture Prize

Pritzker PrizePritzkerPritzker-prize
In 1978, he was awarded an American Institute of Architects Gold Medal and in 1979 the first Pritzker Architecture Prize.
Inaugural winner Philip Johnson was cited "for 50 years of imagination and vitality embodied in a myriad of museums, theaters, libraries, houses, gardens and corporate structures".

Theodate Pope Riddle

Theodate Pope
Johnson was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on July 8, 1906, the son of a Cleveland lawyer, Homer Hosea Johnson (1862–1960), and the former Louisa Osborn Pope (1869–1957), a niece of Alfred Atmore Pope and a first cousin of Theodate Pope Riddle.
Born Effie Brooks Pope in Salem, Ohio, she was the only child of industrialist and art collector Alfred Atmore Pope and his wife Ada Lunette Brooks, and was a first cousin to Louisa Pope, the future mother of architect Philip Johnson.

International Style (architecture)

International StyleInternationalInternational-style
The show and their simultaneously published book International Style: Modern Architecture Since 1922 played an important part in introducing modern architecture to the American public.
It was first defined by Museum of Modern Art curators Henry-Russell Hitchcock and Philip Johnson in 1932, based on works of architecture from the 1920s.

Modern architecture

modernistModernModernism
He is best known for his works of Modern architecture, including the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, and his works of postmodern architecture, particularly 550 Madison Avenue which was designed for AT&T, and 190 South La Salle Street in Chicago. The show and their simultaneously published book International Style: Modern Architecture Since 1922 played an important part in introducing modern architecture to the American public.
In 1932 it was recognized and given a name at an Exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City organized by architect Philip Johnson and architectural critic Henry-Russell Hitchcock, Between 1937 and 1941, following the rise Hitler and the Nazis in Germany, most of the leaders of the German Bauhaus movement found a new home in the United States, and played an important part in the development of American modern architecture.

New York City Ballet

Craig HallStravinsky FestivalLisa Jackson
He added a small pavilion with columns by the lake in 1963, an art gallery set into a hillside in 1965, a postmodern sculpture gallery with a glass roof in 1970; a castle-like library with a rounded tower in 1980; a concrete block tower dedicated to his friend Lincoln Kirstein, the founder of the New York City Ballet; a chain-link "ghost house" dedicated to Frank Gehry.
Its success was marked by its move to the New York State Theater, now David H. Koch Theater, designed by Philip Johnson to Balanchine's specifications.

Henry-Russell Hitchcock

HitchcockHitchcock, Henry-Russell
Upon completing his studies in 1927, he made a series of trips to Europe, visiting the landmarks of classical and Gothic architecture, and joined Henry-Russell Hitchcock, a prominent architectural historian, who was introducing Americans to the work of Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, and other modernists.
In the early 1930s, at the request of Alfred Barr, Hitchcock collaborated with Philip Johnson (and Lewis Mumford) on "Modern Architecture: International Exhibition" at the Museum of Modern Art (1932), the exhibition that presented the new "International Style" architecture of Europe to an American audience.

Marcel Breuer

BreuerMarcel Breuer’s
When the rise of the Nazis in Germany forced the modernists Marcel Breuer and Mies van der Rohe to leave Germany, Johnson helped arrange for them to come to work in the United States.
The two men formed a partnership that was to greatly influence the establishment of an American way of designing modern houses – spread by their great collection of wartime students including Paul Rudolph, Eliot Noyes, I. M. Pei, Ulrich Franzen, John Johansen, and Philip Johnson.

Hackley School

HackleyHackley School (NY)The Hackley School
He grew up in New London, Ohio and attended the Hackley School, in Tarrytown, New York, and then studied as an undergraduate at Harvard University where he focused on learning Greek, philology, history and philosophy, particularly the work of the Pre-Socratic philosophers.
Philip Johnson 1923, architect

Seagram Building

Seagram375 Park AvenueSeagram Building, First Floor Interior
Johnson joined Mies van der Rohe as the New York associate architect for the 39-story Seagram Building (1956).
Philip Johnson designed the interior of The Four Seasons and Brasserie restaurants.

John Burgee

John Burgee ArchitectsBurgeeJohnson/Burgee Architects
In 1967 Johnson entered a new phase of his career, founding a partnership with architect John Burgee.
He was a partner of Philip Johnson from 1967 to 1991, creating together the partnership firm Johnson/Burgee Architects.

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Mies van der RoheMiesianMies
When the rise of the Nazis in Germany forced the modernists Marcel Breuer and Mies van der Rohe to leave Germany, Johnson helped arrange for them to come to work in the United States. In 1928 he met German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, who was at the time designing the German Pavilion for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition.
He built very little in these years (one built commission was Philip Johnson's New York apartment); the Nazis rejected his style as not "German" in character.

Pennzoil Place

Pennzoil Place I
including the IDS Center in Minneapolis (1973), and the two matching towers, facing each other like bookends, of Pennzoil Place in Houston, Texas.
Designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee and built in 1975, Pennzoil Place is Houston's most award-winning skyscraper and is widely known for its innovative design.

Frank Gehry

Frank O. GehryGehry Frank Gehry Architects
He added a small pavilion with columns by the lake in 1963, an art gallery set into a hillside in 1965, a postmodern sculpture gallery with a glass roof in 1970; a castle-like library with a rounded tower in 1980; a concrete block tower dedicated to his friend Lincoln Kirstein, the founder of the New York City Ballet; a chain-link "ghost house" dedicated to Frank Gehry.
Hailed by The New Yorker as a "masterpiece of the twentieth century" and legendary architect Philip Johnson as "the greatest building of our time", the museum became famous for its striking yet aesthetically pleasing design and the economic effect that it had on the city.

Crystal Cathedral

Christ Cathedral
In 1980, Johnson completed a new building in a startling new style; The Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, California, a soaring glass neo-Gothic megachurch for the Reverend Robert H. Schuller.
The reflective glass building, designed by postmodern American architect Philip Johnson, seats 2,736 people.

New Canaan, Connecticut

New CanaanNew Caanan, ConnecticutNew Canaan, Conn.
He is best known for his works of Modern architecture, including the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, and his works of postmodern architecture, particularly 550 Madison Avenue which was designed for AT&T, and 190 South La Salle Street in Chicago.
"Philip Johnson, Marcel Breuer, Landis Gores, John M. Johansen and Eliot Noyes – known as the Harvard Five – began creating homes in a style that emerged as the complete antithesis of the traditional build. Using new materials and open floor plans, best captured by Johnson's Glass House, these treasures are being squandered as buyers are knocking down these architectural icons and replacing them with cookie-cutter new builds."

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

Lincoln CenterLincoln Center TheaterMitzi E. Newhouse Theater
In the same period, Johnson won commissions to coordinate the master plan of Lincoln Center, New York City's new arts center, and to design that complex's New York State Theater, built in a massive and unadorned modernist style.
Philip Johnson: New York State Theater, now known as the David H. Koch Theater, original design of Josie Robertson Plaza (with Wallace K. Harrison and Max Abramovitz) and original Revson Fountain

Seagram

Seagram CompanyJoseph E. Seagram & SonsSeagram Company Ltd.
Johnson was pivotal in steering the commission towards Mies by working with Phyllis Lambert, the daughter of the CEO of Seagram.
The Seagram Building, once the company's American headquarters in New York City, was commissioned by Phyllis Lambert, daughter of Seagram CEO Samuel Bronfman, and designed by architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson.

New London, Ohio

New London
He grew up in New London, Ohio and attended the Hackley School, in Tarrytown, New York, and then studied as an undergraduate at Harvard University where he focused on learning Greek, philology, history and philosophy, particularly the work of the Pre-Socratic philosophers.
Philip Johnson - American architect

David H. Koch Theater

New York State TheaterDavid Koch TheaterNew York State Theatre
In the same period, Johnson won commissions to coordinate the master plan of Lincoln Center, New York City's new arts center, and to design that complex's New York State Theater, built in a massive and unadorned modernist style.
The theater was designed by architects Philip Johnson and John Burgee, opened on April 23, 1964.

Thanks-Giving Square

Bullington Truck Terminal
And in 1977 Johnson completed the spiraling white chapel and meditation garden at Thanks-Giving Square in Dallas.
Pritzker Architecture Prize winner Philip Johnson was commissioned to bring the vision of Thanks-Giving Square to life.

Richard and Geraldine Hodgson House

Hodgson House
After completing the Glass House, he completed two more houses in New Canaan in a style similar to that of Mies; the Hodgson House (1951) and the Wiley House (1953).
It is an International Style house that was built in 1951 to a design by Philip C. Johnson and Landis Gores.

PPG Place

One PPG PlacePPG Building
At about the same time as the AT&T Building, Johnson and Burgee completed other remarkable postmodern skyscrapers; the Bank of America Center (Formerly Republic Bank Center) in Houston (1983) and the PPG Place, the headquarters of the Pittsburgh Plate Glass company (1979–1984).
The company contracted the project to architect Philip Johnson and his partner John Burgee.