Philip Livingston

PhilipLivingston family
Philip Livingston (January 15, 1714 - June 12, 1778) was an American merchant and statesman from New York City.wikipedia
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Albany, New York

AlbanyAlbany, NYCity
Philip Livingston born in Albany, New York, on January 15, 1716 the fourth surviving son of Philip Livingston (1686–1749), 2nd Lord of the Manor and Catherine Van Brugh Livingston, the daughter of Albany, New York, Mayor Pieter Van Brugh.
In 1776, Albany native Philip Livingston signed the Declaration of Independence at Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

William Livingston

Governor LivingstonGovernor William LivingstonLivingston
Along with his brother, William Livingston (1723–1790), he grew up in the Albany area, dividing his time between his father’s Albany Townhouse and the Manor House in Linlithgo, at the junction of the Roeliff Jansen Kill and the Hudson River.
His older siblings included Robert Livingston (1708–1790), 3rd Lord of Livingston Manor, Peter Van Brugh Livingston (1710–1792), New York State Treasurer, and Philip Livingston (1716–1778), a member of the New York State Senate.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independence
He was also a delegate to the Second Continental Congress from 1775 to 1778, and signed the Declaration of Independence.

First Continental Congress

FirstContinental Congress1st Continental Congress
He represented New York at the October 1774 First Continental Congress, where he favored imposing economic sanctions upon Great Britain as a way of pressuring the British Parliament to repeal the Intolerable Acts.

New York Provincial Congress

New York Provincial AssemblyProvincial CongressProvincial Convention
When New York established the New York Provincial Congress in 1775, he was the President.
In response to the letters from Boston, on July 4, 1774 resolutions were approved to appoint five delegates, Isaac Low, John Alsop, James Duane, Philip Livingston, and John Jay, to the "Congress of Deputies from the Colonies" (the First Continental Congress), and request that the other counties also send delegates.

Philip Livingston (1686–1749)

Philip LivingstonPhilip
Philip Livingston born in Albany, New York, on January 15, 1716 the fourth surviving son of Philip Livingston (1686–1749), 2nd Lord of the Manor and Catherine Van Brugh Livingston, the daughter of Albany, New York, Mayor Pieter Van Brugh.

Committee of Sixty

Committee of One HundredCommittee of FiftyCommittee of 51
He joined New York City's Committee of Correspondence to continue communication with leaders in the other colonies, and New York City's Committee of Sixty.
Isaac Low, John Alsop, James Duane, Philip Livingston, and John Jay were then appointed, and the public of the City and County was invited to attend City Hall and concur in the appointments on July 7.

Abraham Ten Broeck

Christina was the sister of Albany Mayor Abraham Ten Broeck and the great-granddaughter of Albany Mayor Dirck Wesselse Ten Broeck (1638–1717), through her maternal grandfather, Wessel Ten Broeck (1664–1747).
He was the brother of Catharine Ten Broeck Livingston (1715–1802), who was married to John Livingston (1709–1791), a son of Robert Livingston the Younger, Anna Ten Broeck (1717–1731), and Christina Ten Broeck Livingston (1718–1801), who was married to Philip Livingston (1716–1778).

1st New York State Legislature

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After the adoption of the new New York State Constitution, he was appointed to the New York State Senate southern district in 1777, while continuing to sit in the Continental Congress.

Robert Livingston (1708–1790)

Robert LivingstonRobertRobert C.
On February 25, 1785, the New York Legislature passed an act, entitled An Act for vesting the Estate of Philip Livingston, late of the City of New-York, Esquire, deceased, in Trustees for the Payment of his Debts, and other Purposes therein mentioned, which named his son and heir, Philip Philip Livingston, Isaac Roosevelt (1726–1794), and Robert C. Livingston (1742–1794), his nephew who was a son of Robert Livingston, 3rd Lord of the Manor.
His younger brothers were Peter Van Brugh Livingston, who married Mary Alexander, sister of Lord Stirling, Philip Livingston, who married Christina Ten Broeck, and William Livingston, who married Susannah French.

Edward Philip Livingston

Edward P. Livingston
Through his son Philip, the only of his sons to have children, he was the grandfather of Philip Henry Livingston (1769–1831) and Edward Philip Livingston (1779–1843), the Lieutenant Governor of New York.
He was the son of Philip Philip Livingston (1741–1787, son of Philip Livingston) and Sara (Johnson) Livingston (ca.

Roeliff Jansen Kill

Roeliff-Jansen KillRoeliff JansenRoeloff Jansen
Along with his brother, William Livingston (1723–1790), he grew up in the Albany area, dividing his time between his father’s Albany Townhouse and the Manor House in Linlithgo, at the junction of the Roeliff Jansen Kill and the Hudson River.
In 1743, Philip Livingston, grandson of Robert, founded the Livingston Forge on the banks of the Roeliff Jansen Kill at "Scotchtown", later called Ancram after the town in Scotland where the Livingstons originated.

Albany Congress

Albany ConferenceAlbany ConventionAlbany Purchase of 1754
Also in 1754, he went as a delegate to the Albany Congress.

Committees of correspondence

Committee of CorrespondenceBoston Committee of Correspondencea committee of correspondence
He joined New York City's Committee of Correspondence to continue communication with leaders in the other colonies, and New York City's Committee of Sixty.
Isaac Low, John Alsop, James Duane, Philip Livingston, and John Jay were then appointed, and the public of the City and County was invited to attend City Hall and concur in the appointments on July 7.

Stephen Van Rensselaer

Stephen Van Rensselaer IIIVan RensselaerMajor General Stephen Van Rensselaer
Through his daughter Catherine, he was the grandfather of Stephen Van Rensselaer III (1764–1839), the patroon of Rensselaerswyck, Philip S. Van Rensselaer (1767–1824), the Mayor of Albany, Rensselaer Westerlo (1776–1851), a U.S. Representative, and Catharine Westerlo (1778–1846), who married John Woodworth, the New York State Attorney General.
His mother was Catharina Livingston, daughter of Philip Livingston, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Edward Livingston (speaker)

Edward Livingston
Through Philip Henry, he was the great-grandfather of Edward Livingston (1796–1840), Speaker of the New York State Assembly.
Philip Philip's father, Philip Livingston (1716–1778), supported the patriot cause prior to the revolution, and as a delegate to the Second Continental Congress signed the Declaration of Independence.

Henry Brockholst Livingston

Brockholst LivingstonHenry B. LivingstonLivingston
After his son's death in 1788, Rev. John Henry Livingston, Thomas Jones, both his sons-in-law, Henry Brockholst Livingston, his nephew, and Alexander Hamilton were appointed the executors of his will.
Livingston's paternal uncles were Robert Livingston (1708–1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston (1710–1792), Philip Livingston (1716–1778), and his paternal grandparents were Philip Livingston (1686–1749), the 2nd Lord of Livingston Manor, and Catherine Van Brugh, the only child of Albany mayor Pieter Van Brugh (1666–1740).

Livingston family

LivingstonLivingstonsCatherine Livingston
*Livingston family
Descended from the 4th Lord Livingston, its members included signers of the United States Declaration of Independence (Philip Livingston) and the United States Constitution (William Livingston).

Stephen van Rensselaer II

In January 1764, he married Catherine Livingston (1745–1810), daughter of Philip Livingston, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and his wife Christina Ten Broeck (his older brother-in-law's sister), and had the following children:

List of mayors of Albany, New York

Mayor of AlbanyMayor of Albany, New YorkMayor
Through his daughter Catherine, he was the grandfather of Stephen Van Rensselaer III (1764–1839), the patroon of Rensselaerswyck, Philip S. Van Rensselaer (1767–1824), the Mayor of Albany, Rensselaer Westerlo (1776–1851), a U.S. Representative, and Catharine Westerlo (1778–1846), who married John Woodworth, the New York State Attorney General.

Philip S. Van Rensselaer

Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer
Through his daughter Catherine, he was the grandfather of Stephen Van Rensselaer III (1764–1839), the patroon of Rensselaerswyck, Philip S. Van Rensselaer (1767–1824), the Mayor of Albany, Rensselaer Westerlo (1776–1851), a U.S. Representative, and Catharine Westerlo (1778–1846), who married John Woodworth, the New York State Attorney General.
He was the brother of Stephen Van Rensselaer III (1764–1839) and the grandson of Philip Livingston (1716–1778).

Rensselaer Westerlo

Through his daughter Catherine, he was the grandfather of Stephen Van Rensselaer III (1764–1839), the patroon of Rensselaerswyck, Philip S. Van Rensselaer (1767–1824), the Mayor of Albany, Rensselaer Westerlo (1776–1851), a U.S. Representative, and Catharine Westerlo (1778–1846), who married John Woodworth, the New York State Attorney General.
Catherine Livingston was the daughter of Philip Livingston (1716–1778), and widow of Stephen Van Rensselaer II, and the mother of Stephen Van Rensselaer.

Isaac Roosevelt (politician)

Isaac Roosevelt
On February 25, 1785, the New York Legislature passed an act, entitled An Act for vesting the Estate of Philip Livingston, late of the City of New-York, Esquire, deceased, in Trustees for the Payment of his Debts, and other Purposes therein mentioned, which named his son and heir, Philip Philip Livingston, Isaac Roosevelt (1726–1794), and Robert C. Livingston (1742–1794), his nephew who was a son of Robert Livingston, 3rd Lord of the Manor.
After her mother's death, Cornelia's father Martinus, married Alida Livingston Hansen, a member of the Livingston family who was the widow of Henry Hansen and younger sister of Philip Livingston, a signor of the Declaration of Independence.

John Henry Livingston

On November 26, 1775, Livingston married his second cousin, Sarah Livingston (1752–1814), a daughter of Philip Livingston, a Continental Congressman and signor of the Declaration of Independence, and Christina (née Ten Broeck) Livingston, sister of Albany Mayor Abraham Ten Broeck.

Eilardus Westerlo

Rev. Eilardus WesterloRev. Eilardus Westerlo (1738–1790)
In 1775, Westerlo married Catharine Livingston, daughter of Philip Livingston ("the Signer") and widow of Stephen Van Rensselaer II.