Philip Syng

Philip Syng, Jr.
Philip Syng (September 29, 1703 – May 8, 1789) was, like his namesake father, Philip Syng, Sr. (1676–1739), a renowned silversmith who created fine works in silver and sometimes gold for the wealthy families of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.wikipedia
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Syng inkstand

In 1752 he created the Syng inkstand, which was used to sign the 1776 United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution in 1787.
The inkstand was made by Philip Syng in 1752 for the provincial assembly of Pennsylvania.

American Philosophical Society

Transactions of the American Philosophical SocietyThe American Philosophical SocietyAmerican Philosophical Society Museum
Besides becoming one of the highly-sought Philadelphia silversmiths, Philip Syng, Jr. was a member of Benjamin Franklin's Junto, and was a founder of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Union Fire Company, Philadelphia Contributionship, Pennsylvania Hospital, and the American Philosophical Society He was a founding trustee of the Academy and College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), serving from 1749 to 1773.
The Philosophical Society, as it was originally called, was founded in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin, James Alexander (lawyer), Francis Hopkinson, John Bartram, Philip Syng, Jr. and others as an offshoot of an earlier club, the Junto.

Philadelphia Contributionship

Philadelphia Contributionship for the Insurance of Houses from Loss by FireContributionshipFire insurance company
Besides becoming one of the highly-sought Philadelphia silversmiths, Philip Syng, Jr. was a member of Benjamin Franklin's Junto, and was a founder of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Union Fire Company, Philadelphia Contributionship, Pennsylvania Hospital, and the American Philosophical Society He was a founding trustee of the Academy and College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), serving from 1749 to 1773.

Christ Church Burial Ground

He died in Philadelphia in 1789, and is buried at Christ Church Burial Ground.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
Philip Syng (September 29, 1703 – May 8, 1789) was, like his namesake father, Philip Syng, Sr. (1676–1739), a renowned silversmith who created fine works in silver and sometimes gold for the wealthy families of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
Philip Syng (September 29, 1703 – May 8, 1789) was, like his namesake father, Philip Syng, Sr. (1676–1739), a renowned silversmith who created fine works in silver and sometimes gold for the wealthy families of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independence
In 1752 he created the Syng inkstand, which was used to sign the 1776 United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution in 1787.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
In 1752 he created the Syng inkstand, which was used to sign the 1776 United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution in 1787.

Cork (city)

CorkCork CityCork, Ireland
Philip Syng was born in Cork, Ireland, to Philip Syng, a silversmith by trade, and Abigail Murdock Syng.

Annapolis, Maryland

AnnapolisAnnapolis, MDAnnapolis, Md.
In 1714 the Syng family emigrated to the United States staying first in Annapolis, Maryland, and then moving to Philadelphia.

Benjamin Franklin

Ben FranklinFranklinFranklin, Benjamin
Besides becoming one of the highly-sought Philadelphia silversmiths, Philip Syng, Jr. was a member of Benjamin Franklin's Junto, and was a founder of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Union Fire Company, Philadelphia Contributionship, Pennsylvania Hospital, and the American Philosophical Society He was a founding trustee of the Academy and College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), serving from 1749 to 1773.

Junto (club)

JuntoJunto Club
Besides becoming one of the highly-sought Philadelphia silversmiths, Philip Syng, Jr. was a member of Benjamin Franklin's Junto, and was a founder of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Union Fire Company, Philadelphia Contributionship, Pennsylvania Hospital, and the American Philosophical Society He was a founding trustee of the Academy and College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), serving from 1749 to 1773.

Library Company of Philadelphia

The Library Company of PhiladelphiaLibrary CompanyLibrary Hall
Besides becoming one of the highly-sought Philadelphia silversmiths, Philip Syng, Jr. was a member of Benjamin Franklin's Junto, and was a founder of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Union Fire Company, Philadelphia Contributionship, Pennsylvania Hospital, and the American Philosophical Society He was a founding trustee of the Academy and College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), serving from 1749 to 1773.

Union Fire Company

Fire companyfire departmentUnion Volunteer Fire Company
Besides becoming one of the highly-sought Philadelphia silversmiths, Philip Syng, Jr. was a member of Benjamin Franklin's Junto, and was a founder of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Union Fire Company, Philadelphia Contributionship, Pennsylvania Hospital, and the American Philosophical Society He was a founding trustee of the Academy and College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), serving from 1749 to 1773.

Pennsylvania Hospital

first hospitalhospital
Besides becoming one of the highly-sought Philadelphia silversmiths, Philip Syng, Jr. was a member of Benjamin Franklin's Junto, and was a founder of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Union Fire Company, Philadelphia Contributionship, Pennsylvania Hospital, and the American Philosophical Society He was a founding trustee of the Academy and College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), serving from 1749 to 1773.

University of Pennsylvania

PennThe University of PennsylvaniaPennsylvania
Besides becoming one of the highly-sought Philadelphia silversmiths, Philip Syng, Jr. was a member of Benjamin Franklin's Junto, and was a founder of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Union Fire Company, Philadelphia Contributionship, Pennsylvania Hospital, and the American Philosophical Society He was a founding trustee of the Academy and College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), serving from 1749 to 1773.

Christ Church, Philadelphia

Christ ChurchChrist Church Burial GroundChrist Church North Garden
Syng married Elizabeth Warner in Christ Church, Philadelphia in 1730 and they had 18 children.

Schuylkill Fishing Company

State in SchuylkillThe State in Schuylkill
Among its 28 founding members were James Logan, Philip Syng, and Joseph Wharton; the first Governor was Thomas Stretch (born Staffordshire, England, 1695), who held the office for 34 years.

Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia Masonic TempleGrand Lodge of Masons of PennsylvaniaGrand Lodge of the Masonic Temple

Ebenezer Kinnersley

Among those who devoted special attention to the subject were Franklin, Kinnersley, Philip Syng, and Thomas Hopkinson.

Experiments and Observations on Electricity

Franklin formed a research core team that consisted of Ebenezer Kinnersley, Thomas Hopkinson, and Philip Syng and developed the first scientific research laboratory in America.

Franklin's electrostatic machine

electrostatic generating machine of his own designelectrostatic machinesexperimentation in electricity
Later, he was also associated with Thomas Hopkinson and Philip Syng in experimentation with electricity.

James Alexander (lawyer)

James AlexanderAlexander
He was an original member of the American Philosophical Society, founded in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin, Alexander, Francis Hopkinson, John Bartram, Philip Syng, Jr. and others

Inkstand

ink standwriting set
The Syng inkstand, made in 1752 by Philip Syng, was used by the American delegates to sign both the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and the United States Constitution in 1787.