Philipp Stamma

Stamma
Philipp Stamma (c. 1705 – c. 1755), a native of Aleppo, Ottoman Syria, later resident of England and France, was a chess master and a pioneer of modern chess.wikipedia
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Algebraic notation (chess)

algebraic notationalgebraic chess notationalgebraic notation used for chess
Stamma's book introduced algebraic chess notation in an almost fully developed form before the now obsolete descriptive chess notation evolved.
Algebraic notation exists in various forms and languages and is based on a system developed by Philipp Stamma.

Descriptive notation

descriptive chess notationdescriptiveEnglish notation
Stamma's book introduced algebraic chess notation in an almost fully developed form before the now obsolete descriptive chess notation evolved.
It was used in Europe until it was superseded by algebraic notation, introduced by Philipp Stamma in 1737.

Aleppo

BeroeaHalepHalab
Philipp Stamma (c. 1705 – c. 1755), a native of Aleppo, Ottoman Syria, later resident of England and France, was a chess master and a pioneer of modern chess.
Philipp Stamma, chess master and writer

François-André Danican Philidor

PhilidorAndré Danican PhilidorFrançois-André Philidor
He was defeated quite handily by Philidor in a famous match in 1747, which marked the beginning of Philidor's rise to fame.
Philidor visited England in 1747 and decisively beat the Syrian Phillip Stamma in a match +8−1=1, although Philidor let Stamma have the first move in every game and scored all draws as wins for Stamma.

King's Gambit

Bishop's GambitKing's Gambit AcceptedKieseritzky gambit
His name is attached to the Stamma Gambit in the King's Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.h4), and Stamma's mate, a rather rare checkmate.
3.h4 (Stamma Gambit)

Checkmate

matecheckmatingmates
His name is attached to the Stamma Gambit in the King's Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.h4), and Stamma's mate, a rather rare checkmate.
In the diagram showing Stamma's mate (named for Philipp Stamma), White to move wins:

Ottoman Syria

OttomanSyriaSyrian
Philipp Stamma (c. 1705 – c. 1755), a native of Aleppo, Ottoman Syria, later resident of England and France, was a chess master and a pioneer of modern chess.

Chess title

chess mastermasterNational Master
Philipp Stamma (c. 1705 – c. 1755), a native of Aleppo, Ottoman Syria, later resident of England and France, was a chess master and a pioneer of modern chess.

Chess endgame

endgameendgamesending
This book brought the Middle Eastern concept of the endgame to the attention of Europe and helped revive European interest in the study of the endgame.

St Martin's Lane

St Martin's Lane HotelUpper St Martin's Lane
Stamma was a regular at Slaughter's Coffee House in St Martin's Lane (London), a center of 18th century English chess, and was considered one of England's strongest players.

Ludwig Bledow

Apart from the higher skills of Philidor, Ludwig Bledow and Otto von Oppen have suggested that his defeat could be attributed to the fact that Stamma, in Ottoman Syria, was used to playing with the Arabic rules and only after his arrival to Europe got acquainted with the Western rules.

Shatranj

chatrangArabic ruleschess
Apart from the higher skills of Philidor, Ludwig Bledow and Otto von Oppen have suggested that his defeat could be attributed to the fact that Stamma, in Ottoman Syria, was used to playing with the Arabic rules and only after his arrival to Europe got acquainted with the Western rules.

John Roycroft

A. John RoycroftRoycroft, John
* John Roycroft: Philip Stamma, in: British Chess Magazine, 124 (2004), pp. 544–49, 603-08

British Chess Magazine

The British Chess Magazine
* John Roycroft: Philip Stamma, in: British Chess Magazine, 124 (2004), pp. 544–49, 603-08

Aleppo Eyalet

AleppoEyalet AleppoEyalet of Aleppo

Queen's Gambit

In the 18th century, it was recommended by Phillip Stamma and is sometimes known as the Aleppo Gambit in his honour.

Chess endgame literature

Teoria e Pratica
Several writers published books developing endgame theory: Gioachino Greco in 1624, Philipp Stamma in 1737, and François-André Philidor in 1749.

Traité des Amateurs

BernardCarlierVerdoni
The first three chapters treat entire games, in which odds are supposed to be given; the fourth chapter is devoted to the consideration of "even" games (no handicap); the fifth concerns the endgame and the sixth consists of a selection of critical situations from Stamma, upon which Ponziani sarcastically remarked:

Chess notation

notation0-11-0
Algebraic chess notation is more compact than descriptive chess notation, and is the most widely used method for recording the moves of a game of chess. In embryonic form it was used by Philip Stamma in the 1737 book Essai sur le jeu des echecs. It was later adopted (in long form) by the influential Handbuch des Schachspiels and became standard in German publications. It is more compact and less prone to error than the English descriptive system. Algebraic notation is the official notation of FIDE which must be used in all recognized international competition involving human players. The U.S. Chess Federation prefers the use of algebraic notation but still permits descriptive notation.

Christianity in Syria

ChristiansChristianSyrian Christians
Noteworthy Syrian Christians include the chronicler Paul of Aleppo, the chess player Philip Stamma, the Syrian actor Bassem Yakhour and the Syrian Armenian musician George Tutunjian.

List of chess players

chess playerchess players
Phillip Stamma (Syria, England, France, 1705–1755)

Legall de Kermeur

LegallLegalleSire de Légal
It is also very likely, as also suggested by Allen, that Legall played Stamma, since the latter lived for a certain period in Paris where he published the Essai sur le jeu des echecs in 1737.

Moses Hirschel

He published the first German translation of the chess writings of Gioachino Greco, together with a re-edition of Philipp Stamma in ''Das Schach des Herrn Giochimo Greco Calabrois und die Schachspiel Geheimniße des Arabers Philipp Stamma übersezt, verbeßert und nach einer ganz neuen Methode zur Erleichterung der Spielenden umgearbeitet (Breslau 1784, Nachdruck Zürich: Olms 1979 und 1987''). Hirschel's translation of the two chess classics was significant as their publication helped to popularize algebraic notationin Germany.

List of chess openings named after people

namedattachedbears his name
Stamma Gambit of the King's Gambit – 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.h4; – named after Philipp Stamma;