Philippine English

EnglishEnglish-languagePhilippinesEnglish languageFilipino EnglishPhilippinePhilippine English phonologytranslated into English
Philippine English is any variety of English (similar and related to English) native to the Philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos.wikipedia
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Filipino language

FilipinoTagalogSpoken languages
English is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being Filipino (Tagalog).
Filipino is also designated, along with English, as an official language of the country.

Tagalog language

TagalogFilipinoTagalog (Filipino)
English is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being Filipino (Tagalog).
Its standardized form, officially named Filipino, is the national language of the Philippines, and is one of two official languages alongside English.

Bislish

Due to the strongly bilingual and multilingual nature of the Philippines, code-switching such as Taglish and Bislish is prevalent across domains from the informal to business and mass media.
Bislish is a portmanteau of the words Bisaya and English, which refers to any of the Visayan languages of the Philippines macaronically infused with English terms.

Philippines

đŸ‡”đŸ‡­FilipinoPhilippine
Philippine English is any variety of English (similar and related to English) native to the Philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos.
Both Filipino and English are used in government, education, print, broadcast media, and business.

Filipinos

FilipinoFilipinaPhilippine
Philippine English is any variety of English (similar and related to English) native to the Philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos.
Following the American occupation of the Philippines and the imposition of English, the overall use of Spanish declined gradually, especially after the 1940s.

Rhoticity in English

non-rhoticrhoticnon-rhoticity
Philippine English is a rhotic accent mainly due to the influence of Philippine languages, which are the first language of most of its speakers.
In the case of the Philippines, this may be explained because the English that is spoken there is heavily influenced by the American dialect.

Phonological history of English consonant clusters

yod-droppingyod-coalescenceYod''-dropping
Yod-coalescence: Like most Commonwealth English variants, the [dj], [tj] and [sj] clusters becomes into [dʒ], [tʃ] and [ʃ] respectively. This makes the words dew, tune and pharmaceutical are pronounced as, and, respectively. For some cases, the use of yod-coalescence is another case of approximation for aspirated consonants which Philippine languages lack in general in words such as twelve.
This happens in Australian, Cockney, Estuary English, Hiberno-English (some speakers), Newfoundland English, South African English, and to a certain extent in New Zealand English, Scottish English (many speakers), and even some varieties of English in Asia, like Philippine English (many speakers, due to influence by the phonology of their mother languages).

Th-stopping

th''-stoppingstoppedstopping
Th-stopping: The consonants and becomes and, respectively. This can be also observed from speakers of Hiberno-English dialects and a number of American English speakers.
Many speakers of Philippine English and some speakers of other variants in Asia also have th-stopping.

Education in the Philippines

accreditededucationhigh school
Most schools in the Philippines, however, are staffed by teachers who are speakers of Philippine English and hence notable differences from the American English from which it was derived are observable.

List of loanwords in Tagalog

loanwordsloanwords from Chinesemany Sanskrit loanwords
List of loanwords in Tagalog
pakialam, "to meddle" and the Sp. suffix –ero, masculine subject); same as majongero ("mahjong", a Chinese word and the Sp. suffix –ero). Daisysiete is a corruption and portmanteau of the English "daisy" and the Spanish diecisiete ("seventeen"), now meaning a sweet and sexually desirable underaged (below 18, hence the number) female.

Hokaglish

Hokaglish, Hokkien-Tagalog-English contact language in the Philippines
It is also considered a hybrid English or X-English, making it one of the Philippine Englishes.

List of dialects of English

varieties of Englishdialects of Englishdialects
List of dialects of the English language
* Philippine English (PhE) (similar to American English with some influence of British English)

Thomasites

The ThomasitesThomasiteAmerican Thomasites
This was catalyzed by the coming of American teachers called "Thomasites" (Bolton & Bautista, 2004).
Philippine English

Philippine literature in English

LiteratureEnglishEnglish-language
Philippine literature in English
Philippine English

Variety (linguistics)

varietiesvarietylect
Philippine English is any variety of English (similar and related to English) native to the Philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
English is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being Filipino (Tagalog). Philippine English is any variety of English (similar and related to English) native to the Philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos.

Code-switching

code-switchcode switchingcode switch
Due to the strongly bilingual and multilingual nature of the Philippines, code-switching such as Taglish and Bislish is prevalent across domains from the informal to business and mass media.

Higher education

post-secondarypost-secondary educationhigher learning
English is also used in higher education, religious affairs, print and broadcast media, and business.

Tagalized Movie Channel

TMC
Movies and TV shows in English are usually not dubbed in most cable channels except a few such as Tagalized Movie Channel.

Curriculum

curriculacore curriculumcore
Because English is part of the curricula from primary to secondary education, many Filipinos write and speak in fluent Philippine English, although there might be differences in diction and pronunciation.

Primary education

primaryelementary educationelementary
Because English is part of the curricula from primary to secondary education, many Filipinos write and speak in fluent Philippine English, although there might be differences in diction and pronunciation.

Secondary education

secondarysecondary schoolhigh school
Because English is part of the curricula from primary to secondary education, many Filipinos write and speak in fluent Philippine English, although there might be differences in diction and pronunciation.

Diction

Pacingspeaking skillsWord-selection
Because English is part of the curricula from primary to secondary education, many Filipinos write and speak in fluent Philippine English, although there might be differences in diction and pronunciation.

Pronunciation

pronouncedpronouncepronouncing
Because English is part of the curricula from primary to secondary education, many Filipinos write and speak in fluent Philippine English, although there might be differences in diction and pronunciation.

American English

EnglishAmericanEnglish-language
Philippine English traditionally follows American English spelling and grammar, except when it comes to punctuation as well as date notations.