Philippine Revolution

revolutionPhilippine Revolution of 1896revolutionaryPhilippine Revolutionary Warrevolutionary governmentFilipino revolutionariesarmed revolutionPhilippine RevolutionariesPhilippine revolutionaryPhilippine war of independence
The Philippine Revolution (Filipino: Himagsikang Pilipino; Spanish: Revolución Filipina), also called the Tagalog War (Spanish: Guerra Tagala, Filipino: Digmaang Tagalog) by the Spanish, was a revolution and subsequent conflict fought between the people and insurgents of the Philippines and the Kingdom of Spain - including its Spanish Empire and Spanish colonial authorities in the Spanish East Indies.wikipedia
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Katipunan

KatipunerosKatipuneroAng Kalayaan
The Philippine Revolution began in August 1896, when the Spanish authorities discovered the Katipunan, an anti-colonial secret organization.
This discovery led to the outbreak of the Philippine Revolution.

Cavite

Cavite ProvinceCavite, PhilippinesProvince of Cavite
In particular, rebels in Cavite led by Mariano Álvarez and Emilio Aguinaldo (who were from two different factions of the Katipunan) won major early victories. From Manila, the Katipunan expanded into several provinces, including Batangas, Laguna, Cavite, Bulacan, Pampanga, Tarlac, Nueva Ecija, Ilocos Sur, Ilocos Norte, Pangasinan, Bicol and Mindanao.
It became the cradle of the Philippine Revolution, which led to the renouncement of Spanish colonial control, finally culminating in the Philippine Declaration of Independence on June12, 1898 in Kawit, Cavite.

Emilio Aguinaldo

AguinaldoGeneral Emilio AguinaldoGen. Emilio Aguinaldo
In particular, rebels in Cavite led by Mariano Álvarez and Emilio Aguinaldo (who were from two different factions of the Katipunan) won major early victories.
He led Philippine forces first against Spain in the latter part of the Philippine Revolution (1896–1898), and then in the Spanish–American War (1898), and finally against the United States during the Philippine–American War (1899–1901).

Spanish–American War

Spanish-American Warwar with SpainSpanish American War
This was the first military action of the Spanish–American War of 1898.
That led to U.S. involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.

Philippine–American War

Philippine-American WarPhilippine InsurrectionFilipino-American War
On February 4, 1899, in the Battle of Manila, fighting broke out between the Filipino and American forces, beginning the Philippine–American War.
While Filipino nationalists viewed the conflict as a continuation of the struggle for independence that began in 1896 with the Philippine Revolution, the U.S. government regarded it as an insurrection.

Tejeros Convention

conferenceconflictconvention in Tejeros
A power struggle among the revolutionaries led to Bonifacio's death in 1897, with command shifting to Aguinaldo, who led the newly formed revolutionary government.
The convention was called to discuss the defense of Cavite against the Spaniards during the Philippine Revolution.

Philippine Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Philippine IndependencePhilippine Independencedeclaration of independence
On June 12, Aguinaldo issued the Philippine Declaration of Independence.
In 1896, the Philippine Revolution began.

Caloocan

Caloocan CityCaloocan (North)Kalookan
During a mass gathering in Caloocan, the leaders of the Katipunan organized themselves into a revolutionary government, named the newly established government "Haring Bayang Katagalugan", and openly declared a nationwide armed revolution.
The city is historically significant because it was the center of activities for the Katipunan, the secret militant society that launched the Philippine Revolution during the Spanish occupation of the Philippines.

Pact of Biak-na-Bato

Pact of Biak na Batoa truce with Spanish authoritiesan agreement was reached
That year, the revolutionaries and the Spanish signed the Pact of Biak-na-Bato, which temporarily reduced hostilities.
The Pact of Biak-na-Bato, signed on December 15, 1897, created a truce between Spanish colonial Governor-General Fernando Primo de Rivera and the revolutionary leader Emilio Aguinaldo to end the Philippine Revolution.

José Rizal

Jose RizalRizalDr. Jose Rizal
Their execution had a profound effect on many Filipinos; José Rizal, the national hero, would dedicate his novel El filibusterismo to their memory. José Rizal's novels, Noli Me Tángere (Touch Me Not, 1887) and El Filibusterismo (The Filibuster, 1891), exposed Spanish abuses in socio-political and religious aspects.
He was executed by the Spanish colonial government for the crime of rebellion after the Philippine Revolution, inspired in part by his writings, broke out.

President of the Philippines

PresidentPhilippine PresidentPresidents
creating the First Philippine Republic with Aguinaldo as President.
In March 1897, during the Philippine Revolution against Spain, Emilio Aguinaldo was elected president of the revolutionary government at the Tejeros Convention.

History of the Philippines (1521–1898)

Spanish colonial periodSpanish colonial eraSpanish Era
Furthermore, the bankruptcy of the Real Compaña de Filipinas (Royal Company of the Philippines) catapulted the Spanish king to open Manila to world trade.
Beginning with the arrival in 1521 of the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, the colonial period of the Philippines as a colony of the Spanish Empire ended with the Philippine Revolution in 1898, which marked the beginning of the American colonization of the Philippines.

El filibusterismo

Juli
Their execution had a profound effect on many Filipinos; José Rizal, the national hero, would dedicate his novel El filibusterismo to their memory. José Rizal's novels, Noli Me Tángere (Touch Me Not, 1887) and El Filibusterismo (The Filibuster, 1891), exposed Spanish abuses in socio-political and religious aspects.
These novels later on indirectly became the inspiration to start the Philippine Revolution.

Malolos Constitution

Constitution1899 Malolos Constitutiona Constitution for the country
The Malolos Constitution was adopted in a session convened on 15 September 1898.
When the KKK was discovered by Spanish authorities, Bonifacio issued the Cry of Balintawak which began the Philippine Revolution in 1896.

Independence Day (Philippines)

Independence DayPhilippine independencePhilippine Independence Day
On 12 June, Aguinaldo proclaimed Philippine independence.
Bonifacio also led the Cry of Pugad Lawin, which signals the beginning of Philippine Revolution.

Filipino language

FilipinoTagalogSpoken languages
The Philippine Revolution (Filipino: Himagsikang Pilipino; Spanish: Revolución Filipina), also called the Tagalog War (Spanish: Guerra Tagala, Filipino: Digmaang Tagalog) by the Spanish, was a revolution and subsequent conflict fought between the people and insurgents of the Philippines and the Kingdom of Spain - including its Spanish Empire and Spanish colonial authorities in the Spanish East Indies.

Manila

Manila, PhilippinesCity of ManilaMaynila
Before the opening of Manila to foreign trade, the Spanish authorities discouraged foreign merchants from residing in the colony and engaging in business.
The city's growing wealth and education attracted indigenous peoples, Negritos, Malays, Africans, Chinese, Indians, Arabs, Europeans, Latinos and Papuans from the surrounding provinces and facilitated the rise of an ilustrado class that espoused liberal ideas: the ideological foundations of the Philippine Revolution, which sought independence from Spain.

Noli Me Tángere (novel)

Noli Me TangereNoli Me TángereCrisostomo Ibarra
José Rizal's novels, Noli Me Tángere (Touch Me Not, 1887) and El Filibusterismo (The Filibuster, 1891), exposed Spanish abuses in socio-political and religious aspects.
The book indirectly influenced the Philippine Revolution of independence from the Spanish Empire, even though Rizal actually advocated direct representation to the Spanish government and an overall larger role for the Philippines within Spain's political affairs.

Apolinario Mabini

MabiniA. MabiniApolinario Mabini Awards
Conservative upper-class members favoring reform, under the leadership of Apolinario Mabini, set up the Cuerpo de Compromisarios, which attempted to revive La Solidaridad in Europe.
Apolinario Mabini y Maranan (July 23, 1864 – May 13, 1903) was a Filipino revolutionary leader, educator, lawyer, and statesman who served first as a legal and constitutional adviser to the Revolutionary Government, and then as the first Prime Minister of the Philippines upon the establishment of the First Philippine Republic.

Malacañang Palace

Malacañan PalaceMalacañangMalacanang Palace
Filipino and Spanish liberals residing in the country welcomed him with a banquet at the Malacañan Palace on June 23, 1869.
Emilio Aguinaldo, recognized as the first Filipino president but of the revolutionary government, the First Philippine Republic, established during the Spanish rule.

1872 Cavite mutiny

Cavite MutinyCavite Mutiny of 1872mutiny
In 1872, the government of the succeeding governor-general, Rafael de Izquierdo, experienced the uprising of Filipino soldiers at the Fort San Felipe arsenal in Cavite el Viejo.
Many scholars believed that the Cavite Mutiny of 1872 was the beginning of Filipino nationalism that would eventually lead to the Philippine Revolution of 1896.

Ladislao Diwa

Andrés Bonifacio, Deodato Arellano, Ladislao Diwa, Teodoro Plata and Valentín Díaz founded the Katipunan (in full, Kataas-taasang, Kagalang-galangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan "Supreme and Venerable Society of the Children of the Nation") in Manila on July 7, 1892.
Ladislao Diwa y Nocon (June 27, 1863 − March 12, 1930) was a Filipino patriot who was among the founders of the Katipunan that initiated the Philippine Revolution against Spain in 1896.

Andrés Bonifacio

Andres BonifacioBonifacioBonifacio Day
Andrés Bonifacio, Deodato Arellano, Ladislao Diwa, Teodoro Plata and Valentín Díaz founded the Katipunan (in full, Kataas-taasang, Kagalang-galangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan "Supreme and Venerable Society of the Children of the Nation") in Manila on July 7, 1892. The Katipunan, led by Andrés Bonifacio, began to influence much of the Philippines.
José Rizal is generally considered the national hero, but Bonifacio has been suggested as a more worthy candidate on the grounds of having started the Philippine Revolution.

Cry of Pugad Lawin

Cry of BalintawakPugad LawinBalintawak
The exact date and location are disputed, but two possibilities have been officially endorsed by the Philippine government: August 26 in Balintawak and later, August 23 in Pugad Lawin.
The Cry of Pugad Lawin, alternately and originally referred to as the Cry of Balintawak (, Grito de Balíntawak), was the beginning of the Philippine Revolution against the Spanish Empire.

Pampanga

Pampanga ProvincePampanga DayKapampangan
From Manila, the Katipunan expanded into several provinces, including Batangas, Laguna, Cavite, Bulacan, Pampanga, Tarlac, Nueva Ecija, Ilocos Sur, Ilocos Norte, Pangasinan, Bicol and Mindanao.
At the eve of the Philippine Revolution of 1896, Pampanga was one of eight provinces placed under martial law for rebellion against the Spanish Empire; it is thus represented on the Philippine national flag as one of the eight rays of the sun.