Phonograph cylinder

wax cylinderwax cylinderscylindercylindersEdison cylinderphonograph cylinderscylinder recordcylinder recordingcylinder recordsEdiphone
Phonograph cylinders are the earliest commercial medium for recording and reproducing sound.wikipedia
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Phonograph

turntablesgramophoneturntable
1896–1915), these hollow cylindrical objects have an audio recording engraved on the outside surface, which can be reproduced when they are played on a mechanical cylinder phonograph.
In the 1890s, Emile Berliner initiated the transition from phonograph cylinders to flat discs with a spiral groove running from the periphery to near the center, coining the term gramophone for disc record players, which is predominantly used in many languages.

Edison Records

EdisonEdison Phonograph CompanyEdison Company
A standard system was decided upon by Edison Records, Columbia Phonograph, and other companies in the late 1880s.
In 1887, Edison turned his attention back to improving the phonograph and the phonograph cylinder.

Phonograph record

vinyl7LP
In the 1910s, the competing disc record system triumphed in the marketplace to become the dominant commercial audio medium.
It had co-existed with the phonograph cylinder from the late 1880s and had effectively superseded it by around 1912.

Dictaphone

Dictaphone CorporationDictaphonesThe Dictaphone Co.
In 1887, their "Graphophone" system was being put to the test of practical use by official reporters of the US Congress, with commercial units later being produced by the Dictaphone Corporation.
This perpetuated the use of wax cylinders for voice recording, which had otherwise been eclipsed by disc-based technology.

Volta Laboratory and Bureau

Volta LaboratoryVolta BureauVolta Laboratory Association
Following seven years of research and experimentation at their Volta Laboratory, Charles Sumner Tainter, Alexander Graham Bell and Chichester Bell introduced wax as the recording medium and engraving, rather than indenting, as the recording method.
The experimental machines built at the Volta Laboratory include both disc and cylinder types, with some of the disc type turntables rotating vertically about a horizontal axis, as well as a hand-powered, non-magnetic tape recorder.

A-side and B-side

B-sidedouble A-sideB-sides
Virtually all US disc records were single-sided until 1908, when Columbia Records began mass production of discs with recordings pressed on both sides.
The first sound recordings at the end of the 19th century were made on cylinder records, which had a single round surface capable of holding approximately two minutes of sound.

Columbia Records

ColumbiaCBSCBS Records
A standard system was decided upon by Edison Records, Columbia Phonograph, and other companies in the late 1880s. Virtually all US disc records were single-sided until 1908, when Columbia Records began mass production of discs with recordings pressed on both sides.
At first it had a local monopoly on sales and service of Edison phonographs and phonograph cylinders in Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Delaware.

HMV

HMV JapanHMV GroupHis Master's Voice
The disc companies had superior advertising and promotion, most notably the Victor Talking Machine Company in the United States and the Gramophone Company/HMV in the Commonwealth.
HMV stands for His Master's Voice, the title of a painting by Francis Barraud of the mixed Terrier, Nipper listening to a cylinder phonograph, which was bought by the Gramophone Company in 1899.

Tin foil

tinfoilfoilkitchen foil
His first successful recording and reproduction of intelligible sounds, achieved early in the following December, used a thin sheet of tin foil wrapped around a hand-cranked grooved metal cylinder.
The first audio recordings on phonograph cylinders were made on tin foil.

Edison Disc Record

Diamond DiscEdison Diamond DiscsEdison Diamond Disc
Edison tried to get into the disc market with hill-and-dale discs, Edison Disc Records.
Edison had previously made only phonograph cylinders but decided to add a disc format to the product line because of the increasingly dominant market share of the shellac disc records (later called 78s because of their typical rotational speed in revolutions per minute) made by competitors such as the Victor Talking Machine Company.

Edison Bell

Edison Bell CompanyEdison Bell RadioEdison-Bell
The Edison Bell company in Europe had separately licensed the technology and were able to market Edison's titles in both wax (popular series) and celluloid (indestructible series).
The National Phonograph Company (i.e. American Edison) was assigned the rights to Thomas Edison's signature, and National, Edison Bell, Pathé and Sterling were the major producers of phonograph cylinders in the early 1900s.

Factory Showroom

This song was released on Factory Showroom in 1996 and re-released on the 2002 compilation Dial-A-Song: 20 Years of They Might Be Giants.

John Philip Sousa

SousaJohn Philips SousaJohn Phillips Sousa
Their general appearance allowed bandleader John Philip Sousa to deride their contents as "canned music", an epithet he borrowed from Mark Twain, but that did not stop Sousa's band from profiting by recording on cylinders.
Sousa held a very low opinion of the emerging recording industry and he derided recordings as "canned music", a reference to the early wax cylinder records that came in can-like cylindrical cardboard boxes.

The Steampunk Album That Cannot Be Named for Legal Reasons

Now That's What I Call Steampunk! Volume 1
In 2010 the British steampunk band The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing released the track "Sewer", from their debut album, Now That's What I Call Steampunk! Volume 1 on a wax cylinder in a limited edition of 40, of which only 30 were put on sale.
The album was released by Leather Apron on CD and digital download and as a limited edition set containing one track on a phonographic wax cylinder.

Gramophone Company

The Gramophone CompanyGramophone & Typewriter CompanyGramophone and Typewriter Company
The disc companies had superior advertising and promotion, most notably the Victor Talking Machine Company in the United States and the Gramophone Company/HMV in the Commonwealth.
The agreement allowed Columbia to produce disc records themselves, which they began doing in 1901; Columbia had previously been manufacturing cylinder records.

Vertical cut recording

hill and dalehill-and-dalevertically-cut
Edison tried to get into the disc market with hill-and-dale discs, Edison Disc Records.
The vertical recording process, also known as the hill and dale process, was used to record phonograph cylinder records as well as Edison Disc Records, Pathé disc records, and disc records made by numerous smaller companies.

Dictabelt

In 1947, Dictaphone replaced wax cylinders with their Dictabelt technology, which cut a mechanical groove into a plastic belt instead of into a wax cylinder.
Dictabelts were more convenient and provide better audio quality than the reusable wax cylinders they replaced.

Archéophone

Archeophone
Currently, the only professional machine manufactured for the playback of cylinder recordings is the Archéophone player, designed by Henri Chamoux.
The Archéophone is a modern, electric version of the phonographs and ediphones from the 19th and early 20th century.

IRENE (technology)

IRENE
This method, developed by physicist Carl Haber, is known as IRENE.
IRENE (Image, Reconstruct, Erase Noise, Etc.) is a digital imaging technology designed to recover analog audio stored on fragile or deteriorating phonograph cylinders, records, and other grooved audio media.

Mapleson Cylinders

Mapleson cylinder
The Mapleson Cylinders are a group of more than 100 phonograph cylinders recorded live at the Metropolitan Opera House, primarily in the years 1901–1903, by the Met librarian Lionel Mapleson (a nephew of impresario James Henry Mapleson).

Cylinder Audio Archive

Cylinder Preservation and Digitization ProjectUCSB Cylinder Audio Archive
The Cylinder Audio Archive is a free digital collection maintained by the University of California, Santa Barbara Library with streaming and downloadable versions of over 10,000 phonograph cylinders manufactured between 1893 and the mid-1920s.

Sound recording and reproduction

recordingrecordedrecordings
Phonograph cylinders are the earliest commercial medium for recording and reproducing sound.
The first practical sound recording and reproduction device was the mechanical phonograph cylinder, invented by Thomas Edison in 1877 and patented in 1878.

Thomas Edison National Historical Park

Edison National Historic SiteEdison LaboratoryEdison Laboratories
Probably the most famous of these are by They Might Be Giants, who in 1996 recorded "I Can Hear You" and three other songs, performed without electricity, on an 1898 Edison wax recording studio phonograph at the Edison National Historic Site in West Orange, New Jersey.
In 1996, the alternative rock band They Might Be Giants recorded four songs on phonograph cylinder at the museum.

Hello Internet

In April 2019, the popular podcast Hello Internet released 10 limited edition wax cylinder recordings.
The two non-digitally released episodes are available exclusively on physical media, the first on a vinyl record and the second on a wax cylinder.