Phosphocreatine

creatine phosphateFosfocreatinePhosphocreatine (PCr)
Phosphocreatine, also known as creatine phosphate (CP) or PCr (Pcr), is a phosphorylated creatine molecule that serves as a rapidly mobilizable reserve of high-energy phosphates in skeletal muscle and the brain to recycle adenosine triphosphate, the energy currency of the cell.wikipedia
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Creatine

creatine monohydrateCreatine ethyl estercreatine supplements
Phosphocreatine, also known as creatine phosphate (CP) or PCr (Pcr), is a phosphorylated creatine molecule that serves as a rapidly mobilizable reserve of high-energy phosphates in skeletal muscle and the brain to recycle adenosine triphosphate, the energy currency of the cell.
In the late 1920s, after finding that the intramuscular stores of creatine can be increased by ingesting creatine in larger than normal amounts, scientists discovered creatine phosphate, and determined that creatine is a key player in the metabolism of skeletal muscle.

Muscle

musclesmuscularmusculature
Phosphocreatine, also known as creatine phosphate (CP) or PCr (Pcr), is a phosphorylated creatine molecule that serves as a rapidly mobilizable reserve of high-energy phosphates in skeletal muscle and the brain to recycle adenosine triphosphate, the energy currency of the cell.
Muscles have a short-term store of energy in the form of creatine phosphate which is generated from ATP and can regenerate ATP when needed with creatine kinase.

Creatine kinase

creatine phosphokinaseCPKCK
Once inside the cells it is transformed into phosphocreatine by the enzyme complex creatine kinase, which makes it able to donate its phosphate group to convert adenosine diphosphate (ADP) into adenosine triphosphate (ATP).
CK catalyses the conversion of creatine and uses adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to create phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP).

Creatinine

serum creatininenormal kidney functioncreatinin
Creatine phosphate can be broken down into creatinine, which is then excreted in the urine.
Creatinine ( or ; from κρέας) is a breakdown product of creatine phosphate in muscle, and is usually produced at a fairly constant rate by the body (depending on muscle mass).

David Nachmansohn

A few years later David Nachmansohn, working under Meyerhof at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in Dahlem, Berlin, contributed to the understanding of the phosphocreatine's role in the cell.
David Nachmansohn (17 March 1899 – 2 November 1983) was a German-Jewish biochemist responsible for elucidating the role of phosphocreatine in energy production in the muscles, and the role of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in nerve stimulation.

Yellapragada Subbarow

Yellapragada SubbaraoYellapragada Subba RaoY. Subba Row
The discovery of phosphocreatine was reported by Grace and Philip Eggleton of the University of Cambridge and separately by Cyrus Fiske and Yellapragada Subbarow of the Harvard Medical School in 1927.
He discovered the role of phosphocreatine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in muscular activity, which earned him an entry into biochemistry textbooks in the 1930s.

Phosphorylation

phosphorylatedphosphorylatephosphorylates
Phosphocreatine, also known as creatine phosphate (CP) or PCr (Pcr), is a phosphorylated creatine molecule that serves as a rapidly mobilizable reserve of high-energy phosphates in skeletal muscle and the brain to recycle adenosine triphosphate, the energy currency of the cell.

Brain

brain functionmammalian braincerebral
Phosphocreatine, also known as creatine phosphate (CP) or PCr (Pcr), is a phosphorylated creatine molecule that serves as a rapidly mobilizable reserve of high-energy phosphates in skeletal muscle and the brain to recycle adenosine triphosphate, the energy currency of the cell.

Adenosine triphosphate

ATPadenosine triphosphate (ATP)adenosine 5'-triphosphate
Phosphocreatine, also known as creatine phosphate (CP) or PCr (Pcr), is a phosphorylated creatine molecule that serves as a rapidly mobilizable reserve of high-energy phosphates in skeletal muscle and the brain to recycle adenosine triphosphate, the energy currency of the cell. Once inside the cells it is transformed into phosphocreatine by the enzyme complex creatine kinase, which makes it able to donate its phosphate group to convert adenosine diphosphate (ADP) into adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

Arginine:glycine amidinotransferase

Glycine amidinotransferaseAGATEC 2.1.4.1
In the kidneys, the enzyme AGAT catalyzes the conversion of two amino acids — arginine and glycine — into guanidinoacetate (also called glycocyamine or GAA), which is then transported in the blood to the liver.

Glycocyamine

guanidinoacetateguanidinoaceticguanidinoacetic acid
In the kidneys, the enzyme AGAT catalyzes the conversion of two amino acids — arginine and glycine — into guanidinoacetate (also called glycocyamine or GAA), which is then transported in the blood to the liver.

Guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase

GAMTguanidinoacetate methyltransferase
A methyl group is added to GAA from the amino acid methionine by the enzyme GAMT, forming non-phosphorylated creatine.

Adenosine diphosphate

ADPadenosine diphosphate (ADP)adenosine diphosphate sugars
Once inside the cells it is transformed into phosphocreatine by the enzyme complex creatine kinase, which makes it able to donate its phosphate group to convert adenosine diphosphate (ADP) into adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

CPK-MB test

CK-MBCreatine Kinase (CK-MB) testcreatine kinase MB
The presence of creatine kinase (CK-MB, MB for muscle/brain) in blood plasma is indicative of tissue damage and is used in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

Blood plasma

plasmaserumblood serum
The presence of creatine kinase (CK-MB, MB for muscle/brain) in blood plasma is indicative of tissue damage and is used in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

University of Cambridge

Cambridge UniversityCambridgeUniversity
The discovery of phosphocreatine was reported by Grace and Philip Eggleton of the University of Cambridge and separately by Cyrus Fiske and Yellapragada Subbarow of the Harvard Medical School in 1927.

Harvard Medical School

Harvard University Medical SchoolHarvardHarvard School of Medicine
The discovery of phosphocreatine was reported by Grace and Philip Eggleton of the University of Cambridge and separately by Cyrus Fiske and Yellapragada Subbarow of the Harvard Medical School in 1927.

Otto Fritz Meyerhof

Otto MeyerhofMeyerhofMeyerhof, Otto Fritz
A few years later David Nachmansohn, working under Meyerhof at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in Dahlem, Berlin, contributed to the understanding of the phosphocreatine's role in the cell.

Kaiser Wilhelm Society

Kaiser Wilhelm InstituteKaiser-Wilhelm GesellschaftKaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry
A few years later David Nachmansohn, working under Meyerhof at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in Dahlem, Berlin, contributed to the understanding of the phosphocreatine's role in the cell.

Sprint (running)

sprintersprintsprinting
Human physiology dictates that a runner's near-top speed cannot be maintained for more than 30–35 seconds due to the depletion of phosphocreatine stores in muscles, and perhaps secondarily to excessive metabolic acidosis as a result of anaerobic glycolysis.

Otto Folin

Otto Knut Olof Folin (April 4, 1867 – October 25, 1934) was a Swedish-born American chemist who is best known for his groundbreaking work at Harvard University on practical micromethods for the determination of the constituents of protein-free blood filtrates and the discovery of creatine phosphate in muscles.

Exercise physiology

exercise scienceexercise physiologistTraining effect
The quick energy sources consist of the phosphocreatine (PCr) system, fast glycolysis, and adenylate kinase.

Physiology of marathons

The Phosphogenic (ATP-PC) anaerobic energy pathway restores ATP after its breakdown via Creatine Phosphate stored in skeletal muscle.

Weakness

astheniamuscular weaknessphysical weakness
They include molecules such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), glycogen and creatine phosphate.