Photorealism

photorealisticphotorealistphoto-realisticphoto-realismphoto-realistphotorealistsphotographicphoto realistphoto realisticphotorealistic paintings
Photorealism is a genre of art that encompasses painting, drawing and other graphic media, in which an artist studies a photograph and then attempts to reproduce the image as realistically as possible in another medium.wikipedia
392 Related Articles

Painting

painterpaintingspainters
Photorealism is a genre of art that encompasses painting, drawing and other graphic media, in which an artist studies a photograph and then attempts to reproduce the image as realistically as possible in another medium.
Paintings can be naturalistic and representational (as in a still life or landscape painting), photographic, abstract, narrative, symbolistic (as in Symbolist art), emotive (as in Expressionism), or political in nature (as in Artivism).

Louis K. Meisel

Louis K. Meisel GalleryMeisel Gallery
The word Photorealism was coined by Louis K. Meisel in 1969 and appeared in print for the first time in 1970 in a Whitney Museum catalogue for the show "Twenty-two Realists."
Louis K. Meisel (born 1942 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American author, art dealer and proponent of the photorealist art movement, having coined the term in 1969.

John Baeder

The first generation of American photorealists includes such painters as John Baeder, Richard Estes, Ralph Goings, Chuck Close, Charles Bell, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy, Robert Bechtle, and Tom Blackwell.
John Baeder (born December 24, 1938) is an American painter closely associated with the Photorealist movement.

Chuck Close

Closeartist biography
The first generation of American photorealists includes such painters as John Baeder, Richard Estes, Ralph Goings, Chuck Close, Charles Bell, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy, Robert Bechtle, and Tom Blackwell.
He makes massive-scale photorealist portraits.

Richard Estes

The first generation of American photorealists includes such painters as John Baeder, Richard Estes, Ralph Goings, Chuck Close, Charles Bell, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy, Robert Bechtle, and Tom Blackwell.
Richard Estes (born May 14, 1932 in Kewanee, Illinois) is an American artist, best known for his photorealist paintings.

Audrey Flack

The first generation of American photorealists includes such painters as John Baeder, Richard Estes, Ralph Goings, Chuck Close, Charles Bell, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy, Robert Bechtle, and Tom Blackwell.
Her work pioneered the art genre of photorealism; her work encompasses painting, sculpture, and photography.

Ralph Goings

The first generation of American photorealists includes such painters as John Baeder, Richard Estes, Ralph Goings, Chuck Close, Charles Bell, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy, Robert Bechtle, and Tom Blackwell.
Ralph Goings (May 9, 1928 – September 4, 2016) was an American painter closely associated with the Photorealism movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Charles Bell (painter)

Charles Bell
The first generation of American photorealists includes such painters as John Baeder, Richard Estes, Ralph Goings, Chuck Close, Charles Bell, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy, Robert Bechtle, and Tom Blackwell.
Charles Bell (1935–1995) was an American Photorealist who created large scale still lifes.

Don Eddy

The first generation of American photorealists includes such painters as John Baeder, Richard Estes, Ralph Goings, Chuck Close, Charles Bell, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy, Robert Bechtle, and Tom Blackwell.
Don Eddy (born November 4, 1944) is an American painter who gained initial fame as a photorealist; but his recent works have veered into the realm of metaphysics.

Roberto Bernardi

Starting with Franz Gertsch in the 1980s Clive Head, Raphaella Spence, Bertrand Meniel, and Roberto Bernardi are several European artists associated with photorealism that have emerged since the mid-1990s.
Roberto Bernardi (born 1974 in Todi, Italy) is a photorealist painter who explores the beauty of everyday life though the reflections and transparencies in his still life paintings, using as his main subject plates and glasses, kitchens appliances, dishwashers, fridges and more recently lollypops and candies.

Hyperrealism (visual arts)

Hyperrealismhyperrealisthyperrealistic
It is also sometimes labeled as Super-Realism, New Realism, Sharp Focus Realism, or Hyper-Realism.
Hyperrealism is considered an advancement of Photorealism by the methods used to create the resulting paintings or sculptures.

The Prague Project

This internationalization of photorealism is also seen in photorealist events, such as The Prague Project, in which American and non-American photorealist painters have traveled together to locations including Prague, Zurich, Monaco and New York, to work alongside each other in producing work.
The Prague Project was an art project involving the photorealist painters Anthony Brunelli, Clive Head, Bertrand Meniel and Raphaella Spence, and the writer Michael Paraskos, held in Prague in 2003.

Ian Hornak

Ian Hornak (January 9, 1944 – December 9, 2002) was an American draughtsman, painter and printmaker and one of the founding artists of the Hyperrealist and Photorealism art movements.

Glennray Tutor

Examples would be the influence of Richard Estes in works by Anthony Brunelli or the influence of Ralph Goings and Charles Bell in works by Glennray Tutor.
Glennray Tutor (born 1950 in Kennett, Missouri) is an American painter who is known for his photorealistic paintings.

Howard Kanovitz

Howard Kanovitz (February 9, 1929 – February 2, 2009) was a pioneering painter in the Photorealist and Hyperrealist Movements, which emerged in the 1960s and 1970s in response to the abstract art movement.

Malcolm Morley

Malcom Morley
He was known as an artist who pioneered in varying styles, working as a photorealist and an expressionist, among many other styles.

John Salt

John Salt (born 2 August 1937) and is an English artist, whose greatly detailed paintings from the late 1960s on wards made him one of the pioneers of the photorealist school.

Robert Cottingham

Although often considered one of the most important photorealist painters, Cottingham rejects the label of being a photorealist.

William Fink

Bill Fink
The artist Bill Fink has developed his own technique for creating photorealistic images using soil, pollen, human hair, and cremated human remains.
William G. "Bill" Fink is an California-based American artist known for his technique for producing images of his subject matter by making the photograph itself out of soil, clippings of human hair, pollen, cremation ashes, etc. to simulate photorealistic vintage photographs of the person/ object/ location from which those media originally derived, and the images then printed in a light-sensitive alternative photographic process Fink describes as "Time and Matter Photography".

Tom Blackwell

The first generation of American photorealists includes such painters as John Baeder, Richard Estes, Ralph Goings, Chuck Close, Charles Bell, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy, Robert Bechtle, and Tom Blackwell.
Thomas Leo "Tom" Blackwell (born 1938 in Chicago, Illinois) is a United States hyperrealist of the original first generation of photorealists, represented by Louis K. Meisel Gallery.

Leigh Behnke

Behnke teaches at the School of Visual Arts in New York City and is married to the photorealist painter Don Eddy.

Robert Bechtle

Robert Alan Bechtle
The first generation of American photorealists includes such painters as John Baeder, Richard Estes, Ralph Goings, Chuck Close, Charles Bell, Audrey Flack, Don Eddy, Robert Bechtle, and Tom Blackwell.
Along with John Baeder, Richard Estes, Chuck Close, Richard McLean, and Ralph Goings, Bechtle is considered to be one of the earliest Photorealists.

Gus Heinze

Gus Heinze (born May 1, 1926 in Bremen, Germany) is an American photorealist painter.

Idelle Weber

Idelle (Feinberg) Weber
Idelle Weber (born 1932) is an American artist most closely aligned with the Pop art and Photorealist movements.

William Nichols (artist)

William Nichols
Nichols developed his mature style in the 1970s, combining painterly traditions going back to Impressionism with reemerging movements such as Realism and Photorealism; critic John Perreault called his approach, "Photo-Impressionism."