Piast dynasty

PiastHouse of PiastPiastsPiast familyPiast kingList of kings of the Piast dynastyPiast agnatePiast duchyPiast dukesPiast dynasties
The Piast dynasty was the first historical ruling dynasty of Poland.wikipedia
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Mieszko I of Poland

Mieszko IMieszkoMieszko I, Duke of Poland
The first documented Polish monarch was Duke Mieszko I (c.
A member of the Piast dynasty, he was a son of Siemomysł, and a grandson of Lestek.

History of Poland during the Piast dynasty

Polishfragmentation of PolandPoland
930–992). The Piasts' royal rule in Poland ended in 1370 with the death of king Casimir III the Great.
The period of rule by the Piast dynasty between the 10th and 14th centuries is the first major stage of the history of the Polish nation.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
The Piast dynasty was the first historical ruling dynasty of Poland.
Poland began to form into a recognizable unitary and territorial entity around the middle of the 10th century under the Piast dynasty.

Casimir III the Great

Casimir III of PolandKazimierz WielkiCasimir the Great
930–992). The Piasts' royal rule in Poland ended in 1370 with the death of king Casimir III the Great.
He was the third son of King Władysław I ("the Elbow-high") and Duchess Jadwiga of Kalisz, and the last Polish king from the Piast dynasty.

Duchy of Masovia

MasoviaDuchy of MazoviaMasovian
Branches of the Piast dynasty continued to rule in the Duchy of Masovia and in the Duchies of Silesia until the last male Silesian Piast died in 1675.
The lands of the Masovians east of the Vistula river had been conquered by the Piast duke Mieszko I of Poland (960–992) and formed a constituent part of his Civitas Schinesghe.

Duchies of Silesia

Silesian duchiesSilesiaSilesian duchy
Branches of the Piast dynasty continued to rule in the Duchy of Masovia and in the Duchies of Silesia until the last male Silesian Piast died in 1675.
In the (vain) hope to prevent an inheritance dispute, the Piast prince Bolesław III Wrymouth by his last will and testament had divided Poland into hereditary provinces distributed among his four sons: Masovia, Kujawy, Greater Poland and Silesia.

Gniezno

GnesenGnesen (Gniezno)Gniezno Cathedral
Shortly afterwards they relocated their residence to Gniezno, where Prince Mieszko I ruled over the Civitas Schinesghe from about 960.
One of the Piast dynasty's chief cities, it was mentioned in 10th-century sources, possibly including the Dagome Iudex, as the capital of Piast Poland.

Jagiellonian dynasty

Jagiellon dynastyJagiellonJagiellonian
The Jagiellonian kings after John I Albert were also descended in the female line from Casimir III's daughter.
The rule of Piasts, the earlier Polish ruling house (c.

Piast the Wheelwright

Piast KołodziejPiastPiast Kolodziej
The early dukes and kings of Poland are said to have regarded themselves as descendants of the semi-legendary Piast the Wheelwright (Piast Kołodziej), first mentioned in the Cronicae et gesta ducum sive principum Polonorum (Chronicles and deeds of the dukes or princes of the Poles), written c. 1113 by Gallus Anonymus.
– 861) was a semi-legendary figure in medieval Poland (9th century AD), the founder of the Piast dynasty that would rule the future Kingdom of Poland.

Civitas Schinesghe

Duchy of PolandPolandPolish state
Shortly afterwards they relocated their residence to Gniezno, where Prince Mieszko I ruled over the Civitas Schinesghe from about 960.
The original deed is missing, but is mentioned in an 11th-century papal regesta called Dagome iudex. It states that the Piast duke wife Oda von Haldensleben had given the guidance of unam civitatem in integro, que vocatur Schinesghe ("a whole state, which is called Schinesghe") over to the Holy See.

Casimir I the Restorer

Casimir ICasimir I of PolandCasimir the Restorer
The Polish monarchy had to deal with the expansionist policies of the Holy Roman Empire in the west, resulting in a chequered co-existence, with Piast rulers like Mieszko I, Casimir I the Restorer or Władysław I Herman trying to protect the Polish state by treaties, oath of allegiances and marriage alliances with the Imperial Ottonian and Salian dynasties.
Casimir I the Restorer (Kazimierz Karol I Odnowiciel; b. Kraków, 25 July 1016 – d. Poznań, 28 November 1058), was Duke of Poland of the Piast dynasty and the de jure monarch of the entire country from 1034 until his death.

Testament of Bolesław III Wrymouth

Testament of Bolesław III Krzywoustytestamentfragmentation of Poland
The Piast position was decisively enfeebled by an era of fragmentation following the 1138 Testament of Bolesław III Wrymouth.
]]The last will and testament of the Piast duke Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland, established rules for governance of the Polish kingdom by his four surviving sons after his death.

Mieszko III the Old

Mieszko IIIMieszko III of PolandMieszko the Old
Numerous dukes like Mieszko III the Old, Władysław III Spindleshanks or Leszek I the White were crowned, only to be overthrown shortly afterwards.
1126/27 – 13 March 1202), of the royal Piast dynasty, was Duke of Greater Poland from 1138 and High Duke of Poland, with interruptions, from 1173 until his death.

Władysław III Spindleshanks

Władysław III LaskonogiLadislaus III SpindleshanksWładysław III
Numerous dukes like Mieszko III the Old, Władysław III Spindleshanks or Leszek I the White were crowned, only to be overthrown shortly afterwards.
Władysław III Spindleshanks (Władysław Laskonogi; b. 1161/67 – 3 November 1231), of the Piast Dynasty, was Duke of Greater Poland (during 1194–1202 over all the land and during 1202–1229 only over the southern part), High Duke of Poland and Duke of Kraków during 1202–1206 and 1228–1231, Duke of Kalisz during 1202–1206, ruler of Lubusz during 1206–1210 and 1218–1225, and ruler over Gniezno during 1216–1217.

Polans (western)

PolansPolanPolanie
The first "Piasts", probably of Polan descent, appeared around 940 in the territory of Greater Poland at the stronghold of Giecz.
The union led by the Piast dynasty developed into the Kingdom of Poland, whose name derives from that of the Polans.

Kraków

KrakowCracowKraków, Poland
For nearly 150 years, the Polish state shattered into several duchies, with the Piast duke against the formally valid principle of agnatic seniority fighting for the throne at Kraków, the capital of the Lesser Polish Seniorate Province.
The first acclaimed ruler of Poland, Mieszko I, took Kraków from the Bohemians and incorporated it into the holdings of the Piast dynasty towards the end of his reign.

Leszek the White

Leszek I the WhiteLeszek BiałyLeszek
Numerous dukes like Mieszko III the Old, Władysław III Spindleshanks or Leszek I the White were crowned, only to be overthrown shortly afterwards.
During the early stages of his reign his uncle, Duke Mieszko III the Old, and cousin Władysław III Spindleshanks, from the Greater Polish branch of the royal Piast dynasty, contested Leszek's right to be High Duke.

Giecz

The first "Piasts", probably of Polan descent, appeared around 940 in the territory of Greater Poland at the stronghold of Giecz.
Since 940 it was one of the key strongholds of the early Piast dynasty.

Mazovia

MasoviaMazowszeMazovian
The Masovian branch of the Piasts became extinct with the death of Duke Janusz III in 1526.
From 1138, Mazovia was governed by a separate branch of the Piast dynasty and when the last ruler of the independent Duchy of Mazovia died, it was fully incorporated to the Polish Crown in 1526.

Silesian Piasts

PiastSilesian Piast dynastySilesian Piast
Branches of the Piast dynasty continued to rule in the Duchy of Masovia and in the Duchies of Silesia until the last male Silesian Piast died in 1675.
The Silesian Piasts were the elder of four lines of the Polish Piast dynasty beginning with Władysław II the Exile (1105–1159), eldest son of Duke Bolesław III of Poland.

Elizabeth of Poland, Queen of Hungary

Elizabeth of PolandElizabethElisabeth of Poland
After the Polish royal line and Piast junior branch had died out in 1370, the Polish crown fell to the Anjou king Louis I of Hungary, son of late King Casimir's sister Elizabeth Piast.
She was a member of the Polish royal House of Piast, the daughter of Władysław I the Elbow-high, prince of Kujavia, later King of Poland, and Jadwiga of Greater Poland.

Louis I of Hungary

Louis ILouis the GreatLouis I the Great
After the Polish royal line and Piast junior branch had died out in 1370, the Polish crown fell to the Anjou king Louis I of Hungary, son of late King Casimir's sister Elizabeth Piast.
Historian Paul W. Knoll writes that Casimir preferred his sister's family to his own daughters or a member of a cadet branch of the Piast dynasty, because he wanted to ensure the king of Hungary's support against the Teutonic Knights.

August of Legnica

Baron August of Legnica
His uncle Count August of Legnica, the last male Piast, died in 1679.
Count August of Legnica (August hrabia legnicki; Graf August von Liegnitz; Brzeg, 21 August 1627 – Siebenhufen near Przeworno, 14 May 1679), was a member of the House of Piast.

Dynasty

dynasticroyal housedynasties
The Piast dynasty was the first historical ruling dynasty of Poland.

Přemyslid dynasty

PřemyslidPřemyslidsPremyslid dynasty
The Bohemian Přemyslid dynasty, the Hungarian Arpads and their Anjou successors, the Kievan Rus', later also the State of the Teutonic Order and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania were mighty neighbours.
Between 1003 and 1004, Bohemia was controlled by Boleslaus the Brave, Duke of Poland from the Piast dynasty, grandson of Boleslaus I the Cruel.