A report on Pictogram

The top traffic sign warns people of horses and riders.
Ojibwa pictographs on cliff-face at Agawa Rock, Lake Superior Provincial Park of a boat and Mishipeshu, an animal with horns, painted with red ochre
Several prehistoric engravings can be found around La Silla Observatory.
A compound pictogram showing the breakdown of the survivors and deaths of the maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic by class and age/gender.
Native American Pictographs from the Great Gallery, Horseshoe Canyon, Canyonlands National Park
Sample National Park Service pictographs
Pictograph from 1510 telling a story of coming of missionaries to Hispaniola
This highly influential pictogram design was introduced at the 1972 Munich Olympics, although pictograms first began to appear in the games at Tokyo in 1964.
British Rail passenger safety pictographs at the end of the platform at Meols railway station
Water, rabbit, deer pictographs on a replica of an Aztec Stone of the Sun

Icon, is a graphic symbol that conveys its meaning through its pictorial resemblance to a physical object.

- Pictogram
The top traffic sign warns people of horses and riders.

16 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Chinese characters (hànzì, 漢字) are morpho-syllabic. Each one represents a syllable with a distinct meaning, but some characters may have multiple meanings or pronunciations

Writing system

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Method of visually representing verbal communication, based on a script and a set of rules regulating its use.

Method of visually representing verbal communication, based on a script and a set of rules regulating its use.

Chinese characters (hànzì, 漢字) are morpho-syllabic. Each one represents a syllable with a distinct meaning, but some characters may have multiple meanings or pronunciations
A Specimen of typefaces and styles, by William Caslon, letter founder; from the 1728 Cyclopaedia
Comparative evolution from pictograms to abstract shapes, in Mesopotamian cuneiforms, Egyptian hieroglyphs and Chinese characters.
Table of scripts in the introduction to Sanskrit-English Dictionary by Monier Monier-Williams
This textbook for Puyi shows the English alphabet. Although the English letters run from left to right, the Chinese explanations run from top to bottom then right to left, as traditionally written
Early Chinese character for sun (ri), 1200 B.C
Modern Chinese character (ri) meaning "day" or "Sun"
A bilingual stop sign in English and the Cherokee syllabary in Tahlequah, Oklahoma
A Bible printed with Balinese script
An overview of the writing directions used in the world

Writing systems were preceded by proto-writing, which used pictograms, ideograms and other mnemonic symbols.

Table illustrating the progressive simplification of cuneiform signs from archaic (vertical) script to Assyrian

Cuneiform

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Logo-syllabic script that was used to write several languages of the Ancient Near East.

Logo-syllabic script that was used to write several languages of the Ancient Near East.

Table illustrating the progressive simplification of cuneiform signs from archaic (vertical) script to Assyrian
round clay envelopes
Tablet with proto-cuneiform pictographic characters (end of 4th millennium BC), Uruk III. This is thought to be a list of slaves' names, the hand in the upper left corner representing the owner.
The Kish tablet, a limestone tablet from Kish with pictographic, early cuneiform, writing, 3500 BC. Possibly the earliest known example of writing. Ashmolean Museum.
Early pictographic signs in archaic cuneiform (used vertically before c.2300 BC).
Sumerian inscription in monumental archaic style, c. 26th century BC
Contract for the sale of a field and a house in the wedge-shaped cuneiform adapted for clay tablets, Shuruppak, circa 2600 BC.
Cuneiform inscriptions recorded by Jean Chardin in Persepolis in 1674 (1711 edition)
Hypothesis for the sentence structure of Persepolitan inscriptions, by Grotefend (1815).
Relying on deductions only, and without knowing the actual script or language, Grotefend obtained a near-perfect translation of the Xerxes inscription (Niebuhr inscription 2): "Xerxes the strong King, King of Kings, son of Darius the King, ruler of the world" ("Xerxes Rex fortis, Rex regum, Darii Regis Filius, orbis rector", right column). The modern translation is: "Xerxes the Great King, King of Kings, son of Darius the King, an Achaemenian".
The quadrilingual hieroglyph-cuneiform "Caylus vase" in the name of Xerxes I confirmed the decipherment of Grotefend once Champollion was able to read Egyptian hieroglyphs.
Once Old Persian had been fully deciphered, the trilingual Behistun Inscription permitted the decipherment of two other cuneiform scripts: Elamite and Babylonian.
The first known Sumerian-Akkadian bilingual tablet dates from the reign of Rimush. Louvre Museum AO 5477. The top column is in Sumerian, the bottom column is its translation in Akkadian.
Extract from the Cyrus Cylinder (lines 15–21), giving the genealogy of Cyrus the Great and an account of his capture of Babylon in 539 BC
Cuneiform sign "EN", for "Lord" or "Master": evolution from the pictograph of a throne circa 3000 BC, followed by simplification and rotation down to circa 600 BC.
Sumerian was the last and most ancient language to be deciphered. Sale of a number of fields, probably from Isin, c. 2600 BC.
Cuneiform writing in Ur, southern Iraq
Pre-cuneiform tablet, end of the 4th millennium BC.
Proto-cuneiform tablet, Jemdet Nasr period, c. 3100–2900 BC.
Proto-cuneiform tablet, Jemdet Nasr period, c. 3100–2900 BC. A dog on a leash is visible in the background of the lower panel.<ref>{{cite web|title=Proto-cuneiform tablet|url=https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/329081|website=www.metmuseum.org}}</ref>
The Blau Monuments combine proto-cuneiform characters and illustrations, 3100–2700 BC. British Museum.
<center>"Assurbanipal King of Assyria"
The Rassam cylinder with translation of a segment about the Assyrian conquest of Egypt by Ashurbanipal against "Black Pharaoh" Taharqa, 643 BC
thumb|Niebuhr inscription 1, with the suggested words for "King" ({{Script|Xpeo|𐎧𐏁𐎠𐎹𐎰𐎡𐎹}}) highlighted. Inscription now known to mean "Darius the Great King, King of Kings, King of countries, son of Hystaspes, an Achaemenian, who built this Palace".<ref name="BAS129">{{cite book |last1=André-Salvini |first1=Béatrice |title=Forgotten Empire: The World of Ancient Persia |date=2005 |publisher=University of California Press |isbn=978-0-520-24731-4 |page=129 |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=kJnaKu9DdNEC&pg=PA129 |language=en}}</ref>
thumb|Niebuhr inscription 2, with the suggested words for "King" ({{Script|Xpeo|𐎧𐏁𐎠𐎹𐎰𐎡𐎹}}) highlighted. Inscription now known to mean "Xerxes the Great King, King of Kings, son of Darius the King, an Achaemenian".
Cuneiform ama-gi, literally "return to the mother", loosely translated as "liberty", is the logo of Liberty Fund.<ref name="Liberty">{{cite web |title=Our Logo {{!}} Liberty Fund |url=https://libertyfund.org/our-logo |website=libertyfund.org |access-date=14 May 2020 |language=en |quote=The cuneiform inscription that serves as Liberty Fund's logo and as a design element in our books is the earliest-known written appearance of the word 'freedom' (amagi), or 'liberty'. It is taken from a clay document written about 2300 B.C. in the Sumerian city-state of Lagash.}}</ref>
The central element of the GigaMesh Software Framework logo is the sign 𒆜 (kaskal) meaning "street" or "road junction", which symbolizes the intersection of the humanities and computer science. The name GigaMesh is an intentional reference to the legendary Gilgamesh from Mesopotamian folklore.

The cuneiform script was developed from pictographic proto-writing in the late 4th millennium BC, stemming from the near eastern token system used for accounting.

Egyptian hieroglyphs, which have their origins as logograms

Logogram

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Written character that represents a word or morpheme.

Written character that represents a word or morpheme.

Egyptian hieroglyphs, which have their origins as logograms
Print excerpt from a 1436 primer on Chinese characters

Dongba script written with Geba script: Naxi language (Dongba itself is pictographic)

Ideograms in the Church of the Visitation, Jerusalem. Five of the symbols are pictograms augmented with red bars representing the idea of "no" or "not allowed". The symbol at bottom left is a pictogram conveying the meaning of "silence".

Ideogram

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Graphic symbol that represents an idea or concept, independent of any particular language, and specific words or phrases.

Graphic symbol that represents an idea or concept, independent of any particular language, and specific words or phrases.

Ideograms in the Church of the Visitation, Jerusalem. Five of the symbols are pictograms augmented with red bars representing the idea of "no" or "not allowed". The symbol at bottom left is a pictogram conveying the meaning of "silence".
Dongba symbols, used by the Naxi people as a mnemonic in reciting oral literature
Comparative evolution of Cuneiform, Egyptian and Chinese characters
20px

Some ideograms are comprehensible only by familiarity with prior convention; others convey their meaning through pictorial resemblance to a physical object, and thus may also be referred to as pictograms.

GHS hazard pictograms

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Hazard pictograms form part of the international Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS).

Hazard pictograms form part of the international Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS).

Two sets of pictograms are included within the GHS: one for the labelling of containers and for workplace hazard warnings, and a second for use during the transport of dangerous goods.

The Tigris river flowing through the region of modern Mosul in Upper Mesopotamia.

Mesopotamia

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Historical region of Western Asia situated within the Tigris–Euphrates river system, in the northern part of the Fertile Crescent.

Historical region of Western Asia situated within the Tigris–Euphrates river system, in the northern part of the Fertile Crescent.

The Tigris river flowing through the region of modern Mosul in Upper Mesopotamia.
Mesopotamian Marshes at night, southern Iraq; reed house (Mudhif) and narrow canoe (Mashoof) in the water. Mudhif structures have been one of the traditional types of structures, built by the Marsh people of southern Mesopotamia for at least 5,000 years. A carved elevation of a typical mudhif, dating to around 3,300 BCE was discovered at Uruk.
One of 18 Statues of Gudea, a ruler around 2090 BC
After early starts in Jarmo (red dot, circa 7500 BC), the civilization of Mesopotamia in the 7th–5th millennium BC was centered around the Hassuna culture in the north, the Halaf culture in the northwest, the Samarra culture in central Mesopotamia and the Ubaid culture in the southeast, which later expanded to encompass the whole region.
Overview map in the 15th century BC showing the core territory of Assyria with its two major cities Assur and Nineveh wedged between Babylonia downstream and the states of Mitanni and Hatti upstream.
The Code of Hammurabi is a Babylonian legal text composed c. 1755–1750 BC. It is the longest, best-organised, and best-preserved legal text from the ancient Near East. It is written in the Old Babylonian dialect of Akkadian, purportedly by Hammurabi, sixth king of the First Dynasty of Babylon.
Epic of Gilgamesh, an epic poem from ancient Mesopotamia, regarded as the earliest surviving notable literature.
Clay tablet, mathematical, geometric-algebraic, similar to the Euclidean geometry. From Shaduppum Iraq. 2003-1595 BC. Iraq Museum.
Medical recipe concerning poisoning. Terracotta tablet, from Nippur, Iraq.
The Burney Relief, First Babylonian dynasty, around 1800 BC
King Meli-shipak I (1186–1172 BC) presents his daughter to the goddess Nannaya. The crescent moon represents the god Sin, the sun the Shamash and the star the goddess Ishtar.
The Queen's gold lyre from the Royal Cemetery at Ur. C. 2500 BCE. Iraq Museum
Royal Game of Ur, Ancient Mesopotamian board Game.
The Babylonian marriage market by the 19th-century painter Edwin Long
Mining areas of the ancient West Asia.
7th-century BC relief depicting Ashurbanipal ((r. undefined – undefined)669–631 BC) and three royal attendants in a chariot.
Campaign in the Mesopotamian Marshes of southern Babylonia during the reign of Ashurbanipal. Showing Assyrian soldiers on boat chasing enemies trying to run away; some are hiding in the reeds
The Standard of Ur; 2600 BC (the Early Dynastic Period III); shell, red limestone and lapis lazuli on wood; height: 21.7 cm, length: 50.4 cm; discovered at the Royal Cemetery at Ur (Dhi Qar Governorate, Iraq)
Bronze head of an Akkadian ruler, discovered in Nineveh in 1931, presumably depicting either Sargon of Akkad or Sargon's grandson Naram-Sin.<ref>M. E. L. Mallowan, "The Bronze Head of the Akkadian Period from Nineveh", Iraq Vol. 3, No. 1 (1936), 104-110.</ref>
Striding lions from the Processional Street of Babylon.
Lamassu, initially depicted as a goddess in Sumerian times, when it was called Lamma, it was later depicted from Assyrian times as a hybrid of a human, bird, and either a bull or lion—specifically having a human head, the body of a bull or a lion, and bird wings, under the name Lamassu.<ref name="GL109">{{cite book |last1=Leick |first1=Dr Gwendolyn |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=_pqEAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA109 |title=A Dictionary of Ancient Near Eastern Mythology |date=2002 |publisher=Routledge |isbn=978-1-134-64102-4 |pages=109–110 |language=en}}</ref><ref name="Livius.org">Livius.org</ref>
Assyrian ornaments and patterns, illustrated in a book from 1920
alt=|Detail of Nebuchadnezzar II's Building Inscription plaque of the Ishtar Gate, from Babylon
alt=|Artist's impression of a hall in an Assyrian palace from The Monuments of Nineveh by Austen Henry Layard, 1853
alt=|A Neo-Assyrian relief of Ashur as a feather robed archer holding a bow instead of a ring (9th-8th century BC)
alt=|The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III. The king, surrounded by his royal attendants and a high-ranking official, receives a tribute from Sua, king of Gilzanu (north-west Iran), who bows and prostrates before the king. From Nimrud
alt=|Contemporary artwork depicting Babylon at the height of its stature.
alt=|"Winged genie", Nimrud c. 870 BC, with inscription running across his midriff.
The Ishtar gate was constructed in about 575 BCE by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
The walls of Babylon, in Babylon
Ziggurat of Ur
Ziggurat of Dur-kuriagalzu in 2010
A suggested reconstruction of the appearance of a Sumerian ziggurat
alt=|The alleged Abraham house in Ur
The walls of Babylon, in Babylon

The standardized form of each cuneiform sign appears to have been developed from pictograms.

USB icon

Icon (computing)

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USB icon
a paw print icon
Power icon
The 3 1⁄2-inch floppy disk was ubiquitous for data storage in the late 20th century, and still continues to be used to represent the save function.
An example of computer icon set design: Nuvola icons come in six different sizes
Power icon

In computing, an icon is a pictogram or ideogram displayed on a computer screen in order to help the user navigate a computer system.

Rock art in Iran, Teimareh region

Petroglyph

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Image created by removing part of a rock surface by incising, picking, carving, or abrading, as a form of rock art.

Image created by removing part of a rock surface by incising, picking, carving, or abrading, as a form of rock art.

Rock art in Iran, Teimareh region
Rock carving known as Meerkatze (named by archaeologist Leo Frobenius), rampant lionesses in Wadi Mathendous, Mesak Settafet region of Libya.
European petroglyphs: Laxe dos carballos in Campo Lameiro, Galicia, Spain (4th–2nd millennium BCE), depicting cup and ring marks and deer hunting scenes
Petroglyph of a camel; Negev, southern Israel.
Reclining Buddha at Gal Vihara, Sri Lanka. The image house that originally enclosed the remains can be seen.
Petroglyphs of the archaeological site of Las Labradas, situated on the coast of the municipality of San Ignacio (Mexican state of Sinaloa)
Composite image of petroglyphs from Scandinavia (Häljesta, Västmanland in Sweden). Nordic Bronze Age. The glyphs have been painted to make them more visible.
A petroglyph of a caravan of bighorn sheep near Moab, Utah, United States; a common theme in glyphs from the desert Southwest and Great Basin
A petroglyph in Bidzar, Cameroon
Lion Plate at Twyfelfontein in Namibia (2014)
Petroglyphs at Ughtasar, Armenia
Petroglyphs in Ladakh, India
Map of petroglyphs and pictographs of Iran
Hunting scene in Koksu petroglyphs
Millenarian rock carvings, Laxe dos carballos at Campo Lameiro, this detail depicts a deer hit by several spears
Petroglyph Park near Petrozavodsk–Lake Onega, Russia
Mammoth on the basalt stone in Sikachi-Alyan, Russia
White Sea petroglyphs, Republic of Karelia, Russia
Fertility symbols, called "Ita Letra" by the local Panambi'y people, in a natural shelter in Amambay, Paraguay
Near Parras, Coahuila
Petroglyph on western coast of Hawaii
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park
Modern Hopi have interpreted the petroglyphs at Mesa Verde National Park's Petroglyph Point as depictions of the Eagle, Mountain Sheep, Parrot, Horned Toad, and Mountain Lion clans, and the Ancestral Puebloans who inhabited the mesa
Petroglyphs at Wadi Qarn.
Petroglyphs at Mada'in Salih.
Petroglyphs of musical instruments.
Petroglyphs of animals, Tabuk.
Hieroglyphic inscriptions, Tabuk.
Islamic inscriptions, Qasim.
Thamudic inscriptions.
Rock carving on Cheung Chau Island, Hong Kong. This 3000-year-old rock carving was reported by geologists in 1970
Petroglyphs at Cholpon-Ata in Kyrgyzstan
Tamgaly petroglyphs in Kazakhstan
Buddhist carvings at Ili River in Kazakhstan
Petroglyphs on a rock wall found in the Sierra Madre mountain range, Rizal, Philippines
Petroglyph found in Awashima shrine (Japan)
Carving "The Shoemaker", Brastad, Sweden
Petroglyph in Roque Bentayga, Gran Canaria (Canary Islands).
Petroglyph at Dalgarven Mill, Ayrshire, Scotland.
Bronze Age petroglyphs depicting weapons, Castriño de Conxo, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia.
Labyrinth, Meis, Galicia.
Cup-and-ring mark, Louro, Muros, Galicia.
Deer and cup-and-ring motifs, Tourón, Ponte Caldelas, Galicia.
Petroglyphs in Zalavruga, Belomorsk, Karelia, Russia
The sorcerer, Vallée des Merveilles, France
The tribe master, Vallée des Merveilles, France
Grosio - Rupe Magna
Grosio - Rupe Magna
Grosio - Rupe Magna
Leftmost of three central stones, Knockmany Chambered Tomb, Co. Tyrone, Northern Ireland
Central of three central stones, Knockmany Chambered Tomb, Co. Tyrone, Northern Ireland
A stone on the right of the passage, Knockmany Chambered Tomb, Co. Tyrone, Northern Ireland
Sess Kilgreen Chambered Tomb, Co. Tyrone, Northern Ireland
Sess Kilgreen Chambered Tomb, Co. Tyrone, Northern Ireland
Carvings of various zoomorphic creatures, including in particular, a horse
Paleolithic rock engravings breaking the natural rock formation
Various zoomorphic creatures, including in particular, a Bull
Talampaya National Park, La Rioja Province, Argentina
Petroglyph on Tunduqueral hill at Uspallata, Argentina
Capivara National Park, Piauí, Brazil
Ivolandia, Goiás, Brazil
Costao do Santinho, SC, Brazil
Numerous rocks boasting thousand-year-old carvings.<ref>{{cite web|title=Settlers at La Silla|url=http://www.eso.org/public/images/potw1723a/|website=www.eso.org|access-date=6 June 2017}}</ref>
Modern science and the spectre of ancient man coexist in this thought-provoking image of a petroglyph.<ref>{{cite web|title=The Ascent of Man|url=http://www.eso.org/public/images/potw1552a/|access-date=28 December 2015}}</ref>
Llamas at La Silla<ref>{{cite news|title=Llamas at La Silla|url=http://www.eso.org/public/images/potw1417a/|access-date=29 April 2014|newspaper=ESO Picture of the Week}}</ref>
Petroglyphs at Orongo, Rapa Nui (Easter Island). A Makemake at the base and two birdmen higher up
El Abra archaeological site, Cundinamarca
Petroglyph in the Chiribiquete Natural National Park. (Possible equine)
Petroglyph in the Chiribiquete Natural National Park. Aboriginal
Petroglyph in the Chiribiquete Natural National Park. (Possible mammal).
Petroglyphs in the Chiribiquete Natural National Park.
Petroglyphs on a Bishop Tuff tableland, eastern California
Southern Utah
Southern Utah
Utah
Arches National Park
Animal print carvings outside of Barnesville, Ohio
Arizona
Picacho Mountain Petroglyphs
Columbia River Gorge, Washington
Upside-down man in Western Colorado
Rochester Rock Art Panel in the San Rafael Swell in Utah
Web-like petroglyph on the White Tank Mountain Regional Park Waterfall Trail, Arizona
Chipping petroglyph on the White Tank Mountain Regional Park Waterfall Trail, Arizona
Sample of petroglyphs at Painted Rock near Gila Bend, Arizona off Interstate 8.
Puye Cliff Dwellings, New Mexico
ThunderBird Rock Carved Petroglyph in West Central Wisconsin
Detail of a carved archer-like figure, Sanilac Petroglyphs Historic State Park, Sanilac County, Michigan
Sky Rock Petroglyphs, Bishop, California.
Sky Rock Petroglyphs, Bishop, California.
Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, New South Wales
Part of a 20-metre-long petroglyph at Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, New South Wales
Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, New South Wales
Mutawintji National Park, New South Wales
Burrup Peninsula, Western Australia

Around 7,000 to 9,000 years ago, following the introduction of a number of precursors of writing systems, the existence and creation of petroglyphs began to suffer and tail off, with different forms of art, such as pictographs and ideograms, taking their place.

Major cultural areas of the pre-Columbian Americas:      . This map does not show Greenland, which is part of the Arctic cultural area.

Visual arts by indigenous peoples of the Americas

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Visual arts by indigenous peoples of the Americas encompasses the visual artistic practices of the indigenous peoples of the Americas from ancient times to the present.

Visual arts by indigenous peoples of the Americas encompasses the visual artistic practices of the indigenous peoples of the Americas from ancient times to the present.

Major cultural areas of the pre-Columbian Americas:      . This map does not show Greenland, which is part of the Arctic cultural area.
Map of the Mesoamerican cultural region
Drawing class at the Phoenix Indian School, 1900
Traditional Yahgan basket, woven by Abuela Cristina Calderón, Chile, photo by Jim Cadwell
Kumeyaay coiled basket, Celestine Lachapa of Inajo, late 19th century
Yurok women's basketry caps, Northern California
Embera woman selling coiled baskets, Panama
Examples of contemporary Native American beadwork
Huichol bead artist, photo by Mario Jareda Beivide
Mata Ortiz pottery jar by Jorge Quintana, 2002. Displayed at Museum of Man, San Diego, California
Performance art by Wayne Gaussoin (Picuris), Museum of Contemporary Native Art
Martín Chambi (Peru), photo of a man at Machu Picchu, published in Inca Land. Explorations in the Highlands of Peru, 1922
Lee Marmon (Laguna Pueblo, 1925–2021), next to his most famous photograph, "White Man's Moccasins"
Lorena Lemunguier Quezada (Mapuche) with two of her weavings at the Bienal de Arte Indígena, Santiago, Chile
Kaqchikel Maya sash, Santa Catarina Palopó, Guatemala, c. 2006-07
Kuna woman with molas, San Blas Islands, Panama
{{center|Seminole patchwork fringed dance shawl, Big Cypress Indian Reservation, Florida, 1980s}}
A petroglyph of a caravan of bighorn sheep near Moab, Utah, United States; a common theme in glyphs from the southwestern desert
{{center|Archaic abstract curvilinear style petroglyphs, Coso Rock Art District, California}}
<center>Petroglyph from Columbia River Gorge, Washington, United States</center>
Baleen basket with whale tooth finial, by George Omnik (Iñupiaq, 1905–1978), Alaska; Honolulu Museum of Art (Hawaii, USA)
A carved representation of a tupilaq, from Greenland
Yup'ik mask; from Alaska; Musée du quai Branly (Paris)
Toy Angakkuq (shaman); 6 February 1998; serpentine, caribou bone & feathers; by Palaya Qiatsuq
21st-century Athabaskan moosehair tufting on beaded hide box, Fairbanks, Alaska
Tsuu T'ina painted hide tipi, Alberta, Canada
Man's hide jacket. The floral designs' stems feature "thorny" beadwork, typical of the Subarctic, Museum of Anthropology at UBC
A totem pole in Ketchikan, Alaska, in the Tlingit style
'Namgis thunderbird transformation mask, 19th century, cedar, pigments, leather, nails, metal plate, 71 in. wide when open, Brooklyn Museum, NY
Haida argillite carving; 1850–1900; from Haida Gwaii; National Museum of the American Indian
Cedar bark hat; Nuu-chah-nulth; Museum of the Americas (Madrid, Spain)
<center>Hopewell mounds from the Mound City Group in Ohio</center>
<center>Carved soapstone pipe depicting a raven, Hopewell tradition</center>
{{center|Copper falcon from the Mound City Group site of the Hopewell culture}}
<center>Great Treaty wampum belt given from the Lenape to William Penn, Pennsylvania, 1682</center>
{{center|Clay cooking utensils, Poverty Point}}
{{center|Clay female figurines, Poverty Point}}
{{center|Carved gorgets and atlatl weights, Poverty Point}}
<center>Engraved shell gorget, Spiro Mounds (Mississippian culture)</center>
{{center|Engraved stone palette, Moundville Site, back used for mixing paint (Mississippian culture)}}
<center>Stone effigies, Etowah Site (Mississippian culture)</center>
<center>Ceramic underwater panther jug, Rose Mound (Mississippian culture)</center>
{{center|Eagle totem, Fort Center, Florida}}
{{center|Alligator effigy, wood carving, Key Marco, Florida}}
{{center|Wooden mask, Key Marco, Florida}}
{{center|Sioux dress with fully beaded yoke.}}
{{center|Sioux beaded and painted rawhide parfleches.}}
<center>Ledger drawing of Haokah (c. 1880) by Black Hawk (Lakota).</center>
<center>Kiowa ledger art, possibly of the 1874 Buffalo Wallow battle, Red River War.</center>
{{center|Nez Perce bag with contour beadwork, c. 1850-60}}
{{center|Nez Perce man's beaded and quilled buckskin shirt with eagle feathers and ermine pelts, c. 1880-85}}
{{center|Shoshone beaded men's moccasins, circa 1900, Wyoming}}
Basket by Carrie Bethel (Mono Lake Paiute), California, 30" diam., c. 1931-35
Chumash rock art at Painted Cave
{{center|A basket made by the Pomo people of northern California.}}
{{center|Pomo beaded, coiled basket, sedgeroot, willow, glass beads, abalone, circa 1880}}
Late 19th-century Hupa woman's cap, bear grass and conifer root, Stanford University
Montezuma Castle, a Sinagua cliff dwelling in Arizona, c. 700 CE–1425 CE
<center>Ancestral Pueblo canteen, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, c. 700 CE&ndash;1100 CE</center>
<center>Navajo Sandpainting.</center>
Monument 1, one of the four Olmec colossal heads at La Venta. This one is nearly 3 metres (9 ft) tall.
{{center|An "elongated man" figurine, dark green serpentine.}}
<center>Kunz Axe; 1200-400 BCE; polished green quartz (aventurine); height: 29 cm, width: 13.5 cm; British Museum (London)<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/aoa/j/jade_votive_axe.aspx|title=The British Museum Website|access-date=15 June 2017|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20151018233613/http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/aoa/j/jade_votive_axe.aspx|archive-date=18 October 2015|url-status=dead}}</ref></center>
Jade mask; 10th–6th century BCE; jadeite; height: 17.1 cm (6{{fraction|3|4}} in.), width: 16.5 (6{{fraction|5|16}} in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
A mural showing what has been identified as the Great Goddess of Teotihuacan
Restored Teotihuacan architecture showing typical Mesoamerican use of red paint complemented on gold and jade decoration upon marble and granite
Mask with a necklace with 55 beads and pendant; serpentine inlaid with amazonite, turquoise, shell, coral and obsidian, 8 in. H, National Museum of Anthropology
Statue of Chalchiuhtlicue; National Museum of Anthropology
{{center|A large terracotta figurine of a young chieftain in the Remojadas style. 300–600 CE; Height: 31 in (79 cm).}}
{{center|Male-female duality figure from Remojadas, 200–500 CE. Note the feminine breast and birds on the right side of the figure.}}
Veracruz altar urn
Stone head of a woman from El Tajin
<center>Ceramic urn, 200 BCE – 800 CE, British Museum.<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/aoa/p/pottery_ancestor_figure.aspx|title=The British Museum Website|access-date=15 June 2017|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20151018233705/http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/aoa/p/pottery_ancestor_figure.aspx|archive-date=18 October 2015|url-status=dead}}</ref></center>
Ceramic Zapotec vessel
Golden ornamentation worn by Zapotec government officials
Mosaic mask that represents a Bat god, 25 pieces of jade, with yellow eyes made of shell. It was found in a tomb at Monte Albán
Classic Period Maya eccentric flint, possibly from Copán or Quiriguá, Musées Roayaux d'art et d'Histoire, Brussels
Portrait of K'inich Janaab Pakal I; 615–683; stucco; height: 43 cm (1 ft 5 in.); National Museum of Anthropology (Mexico City)
Jade plaque of a Maya king; 400-800 (Classic period); height: 14 cm, width: 14 cm; found at Teotihuacan; British Museum (London).
Relief showing Aj Chak Maax presenting captives before ruler Itzamnaaj B'alam III of Yaxchilan; 22 August 783
{{center|The Atlantes — columns in the form of Toltec warriors in Tula.}}
{{center|An expressive orange-ware clay vessel in the Toltec style.}}
Toltec bird carving in granite at Tula
Toltec turtle vessel
<center>Mixtec king and warlord Eight Deer Jaguar Claw (right) Meeting with Four Jaguar, in a depiction from the pre-Columbian Codex Zouche-Nuttall.</center>
Mixtec pectoral of gold and turquoise, Shield of Yanhuitlán. National Museum of Anthropology
Closeup view of Mixtec stone mosaic-work at Mitla. This was an inspiration for similar mosaics by Frank Lloyd Wright.
Mixtec incense burner
Figure of a seated commander; 300–600; Art Institute of Chicago (USA)
Standing male figure; 600–900; earthenware; from central Veracruz (Mexico); Gardiner Museum (Toronto, Canada)
Sculpture; 700–900; andesite; height: 35.56 cm (14 in.)
Heads; circa 900; Leipzig Museum of Ethnography (Leipzig, Germany)
Double-headed serpent; 1450–1521; Spanish cedar wood (Cedrela odorata), turquoise, shell, traces of gilding and pine resin and Bursera resin for adhesive; 20.3 in. H; British Museum (London).
The original page 13 of the Codex Borbonicus; {{lang|fr|Bibliothèque de l'Assemblée Nationale}} (Paris). This 13th {{lang|es|trecena}} (of the Aztec sacred calendar) was under the auspices of the goddess {{lang|nci|Tlazōlteōtl|italic=no}}, who is shown on the upper left wearing a flayed skin, giving birth to {{lang|nci|Centeōtl}}.  The 13-day-signs of this {{lang|es|trecena}}, starting with 1 Earthquake, 2 Flint/Knife, 3 Rain, etc., are shown on the bottom row and the right column
Aztec calendar stone; 1502–1521; basalt; diameter: 358 cm (141 in.); thick: 98 cm (39 in.); discovered on 17 December 1790 during repairs on the Mexico City Cathedral; National Museum of Anthropology (Mexico City). The exact purpose and meaning of the Calendar Stone are unclear. Archaeologists and historians have proposed numerous theories, and it is likely that there are several aspects to its interpretation<ref name="colonial_latin_america_p23">K. Mills, W. B. Taylor & S. L. Graham (eds), Colonial Latin America: A Documentary History, 'The Aztec Stone of the Five Eras', p. 23</ref>
Tlāloc effigy vessel; 1440–1469; painted earthenware; height: 35 cm (1{{fraction|3|4}} in.); {{lang|es|Museo del Templo Mayor|italic=no}} (Mexico City). {{lang|es|Templo Mayor|italic=no}}, dedicated to {{lang|nci|Tlāloc|italic=no}}. This jar, covered with stucco and painted blue, is adorned with the visage of {{lang|nci|Tlāloc|italic=no}}, identified by his coloration, ringed teeth and jaguar teeth
<center>Duho (Ceremonial wooden stool), Hispaniola. Taíno, 1000-1500 CE, carved lignum vitae</center>
<center>Taíno zemi, ironwood with shell inlay, Dominican Republic, 15th-16th-century bowl used for cohoba rituals<ref name=heil>"Deity Figure (Zemi) Dominican Republic; Taino (1979.206.380)"</ref></center>
<center>Las Caritas, Taíno petroglyphs, Lake Enriquillo, Dominican Republic</center>
<center>Taíno batey ball court petroglyph, Caguana, Utuado, Puerto Rico</center>
Zoomorphico-anthropomorphic figures from San Agustín Archaeological Park
Figure from San Agustín Archaeological Park
Double-spouted jar with strap handle; 500 BCE-500 CE; slip-painted ceramic; height: 21.27 cm (8{{fraction|3|8}} in.), width: 19.05 cm (7{{1/2}} in.), depth: 17.46 cm (6{{fraction|7|8}} in.); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (USA)
Pendant; 1 CE-900; gold; 3.1 x 9.7 x 8.8 cm; Gold Museum (Bogotá, Colombia)
Funerary mask; 5th-1st century BCE; embossed gold; Ilama stage; Metropolitan Museum of Art
Animal-headed figure pendant; 1st–7th century; gold; height: 6.35 cm (2{{1/2}} in.); Yotoco stage; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Double spout and strap handle vessel with a mythological figure; 400–1200; slip-painted ceramic; height: 19.37 cm (7{{fraction|5|8}} in.), width: 19.05 cm (7{{1/2}} in.), depth: 10.32 cm (4{{fraction|1|16}}in.); Yotoco stage; Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Pectoral; 1 CE-550; tumbaga; 23.4 x 25.7 cm; Gold Museum (Bogotá, Colombia)
Pendant; 1st-7th century; gold; Cleveland Museum of Art (Cleveland, Ohio, USA)
Anthropomorphic pendant; 5th-10th century; Metropolitan Museum of Art
Pendants in the form of flying fish; 10th-15th century; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Pedestal dish; 600–800; height: 15.24 cm (6 in.), diameter: 27.69 cm (10{{fraction|7|8}} in.); Walters Art Museum
Ceramic plate; University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (USA)
Gold plaque from Sitio Conte; University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
Human being with his protective spirit; 6th century-9th century; Rietberg Museum (Zürich, Switzerland)
Container with turtle design; 11th century-14th century; Cleveland Museum of Art (Ohio, USA)
2 shark-shaped pendants; 11th-16th century; gold alloy casting; from Chiriqui Province; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Pendant with 2 figurines; gold; 12th century-16th century; Metropolitan Museum of Art
One of the stone spheres of Costa Rica
Ceremonial metate; 1500 BCE-1400; height: 56 cm (22{{fraction|1|16}} in.), width: 94.4 cm (37{{fraction|3|16}} in.), depth: 78 cm (30{{fraction|11|16}} in.); Walters Art Museum (Baltimore, USA)
Stone figure resembling a masked shaman; 1000–1500; Musée du quai Branly (Paris)
Two lobster-shapped pendants; 700–1550; Museo del Jade Marco Fidel Tristán Castro (San José, Costa Rica)
Bird pendant; 1st–5th century; jadeite; height: 6.7 cm (2{{fraction|5|8}} in.), width: 1.9 cm ({{fraction|3|4}} in.), depth: 4.7 cm (1{{fraction|7|8}} in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Celt-shaped pendant that probably represents a god; 4th century BCE-7th century CE; jadeite; from southern Nicoya region; Cleveland Museum of Art (Ohio, USA)
Shaman effigy vessel; 1000–1350; earthenware, white slip overall, slip paint; height: 30.4 cm (12 in), width: 24.1 cm (9.5 in), depth: 24.3 cm (9.5 in); Walters Art Museum (Baltimore, USA)
Nose ornament; 7th-12th century; cantilever gold alloy; Metropolitan Museum of Art
Nose ornament; 7th-12th century; cantilever gold alloy; Metropolitan Museum of Art
Footed bowl depicting a pair of monkeys; 750–1250; resist-painted ceramic; height: 8.9 cm (3{{fraction|1|2}} in.), diameter of the bowl: 20.48 cm (8{{fraction|1|16}} in.), diameter of the foot: 7.94 cm (3{{fraction|1|8}} in.); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (USA)
Gourd-shaped vessel; 850–1500; resist-painted ceramic; height: 26.35 cm (10{{fraction|3|8}}in.), diameter: 20.32 cm (8 in.); Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Lime container; 5th-9th century; gold; 23 cm (9 in) high; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City). Likely used by a member of the Quimbaya elite
Two statues caciques sitting on stools; Museum of the Americas (Madrid, Spain)
Quimbaya airplanes in Museum of the Americas (Madrid)
Ceramic figurine with tumbaga decoration; 1200–1500; Museum of the Americas
The Muisca raft; circa 600–1600; gold alloy; 19.5 x 10.1 cm; Gold Museum (Bogotá, Colombia)
Tunjo; 10th-16th century; from Guatavita Lake region; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Mask; gold; 8.7 x 12.7 cm; Gold Museum (Bogotá)
Ceramic mask; Colombian National Museum (Bogotá)
Two-headed deer-shaped ornament; circa 400–1000; Cleveland Museum of Art (Cleveland, Ohio, USA)
Owl-shaped ornament; circa 400–1000; Cleveland Museum of Art
Bird finial; 5th–10th century; gold; height 12.1 cm (4{{3/4}} in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Olla with annular base and modeled figures; 500–1550; ceramic yellow-ware; height: 28.6 cm (11.2 in); width: 31.8 cm (12.5 in); Walters Art Museum (Baltimore, USA)
Small footed bowl with tiger head handles; 1000–1500; earthenware; 5 × 10.1 cm (2 × 4 in.); Walters Art Museum (Baltimore, USA)
Ancestral figure; 1000–1550; brown stone; height: 18.1 cm (7.1 in), width: 4.8 cm (1.8 in); Walters Art Museum
Anthopomorphic pendant; 1000–1550; gold alloy casting; width: 14.6 cm (5{{fraction|3|4}} in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Anthopomorphic pendant; 18th century; gold; height: 13 cm (5.1 in), width: 13 cm (5.1 in), depth: 4.5 cm (1.7 in); Musée du Quai Branly (Paris)
Golden knife for ceremonies; 2nd century CE; from the Valley of the Cauca river; Gold Museum (Bogotá, Colombia)
Nose ornament; undated; gold alloy; height: 19.9 cm (7.8 in.), width: 5.2 cm (2 in.), depth: 0.1 cm; Walters Art Museum (Baltimore, USA)
Parrot figure; 4000-1500 BC
Ancestor statue with six faces; Casa del Alabado Museum of Pre-Columbian Art (Quito, Ecuador)
Female figurine; 2600-1500 BCE; ceramic; 11 x 2.9 x 1.6 cm (4{{fraction|5|16}} x 1{{fraction|1|8}} x {{fraction|5|8}} in.); Brooklyn Museum (New York City)
Jaguar-shaped figure; 2000-1000 BCE; green serpentine
A Chavin stone sculpture in the shape of a head of a man, an ornament from a wall; 9th century BCE; Museo de la Nación (Lima, Peru)
Chavin crown; 1200 BCE-1 CE (Formative Epoch); gold; Larco Museum (Lima)
Stirrup-spout vessel with scroll ornament; ceramic; 900-200 BCE; height: 18.4 cm, diameter: 16.2 cm; Dallas Museum of Art (Dallas, Texas, USA)
Raimondi Stela; 5th-3rd century BCE; granite; height: 1.95 (6 ft. 6 in.); Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Antropología e Historia del Perú (Lima, Peru).
<center>Paracas mantle 200 CE Larco Museum, Lima-Perú</center>
<center>Nazca mantle from Paracas Necropolis, 0-100 . This is a "double fish" (probably sharks) design. Brooklyn Museum collections</center>
<center>A fish-like double spout and bridge vessel from Cahuachi</center>
{{center|An example of the Nasca Lines}}
Ceremonial headdress; 300–600; gold, chrysocolla & shells
Pottery that represents a Crawling Feline; ceramic with nacre inlays; Larco Museum (Lima, Peru)
2 ear ornaments with winged runners; 5th century-8th century; gold, turquoise, sodalite & shell; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Seated figure; 2nd century BCE-3rd century CE; stone; 63.5 × 44.45 × 20.32 cm (25 × 17{{1/2}} × 8 in.); weight: 102.5129 kg (226 lb.); Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Effigy bottle; 200 BCE 500 CE; earthenware & slip paint; height: 28.2 cm (11.1 in.), diameter: 20.5 cm (8 in.); Walters Art Museum (Baltimore, USA)
Vase with music scene; 300 BCE-300 CE painted clay; height: 21.5 cm; from northern coastal region of Peru; Kloster Allerheiligen (Schaffhausen; Switzerland)
Textile fragment; 4th–6th century; camelid hair; overall: 33.02 x 82.55 cm (13 × 32{{1/2}} in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art
Standing figure; 1st century BCE-1st century CE; emossed gold; height: 22.9 cm (9 in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art
Nose-ornament; 1st-5th century; gold and embossed silver; Metropolitan Museum of Art
Ornament in the shape of a bird; 6th-10th century; embossed gold; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Anthropomorphic figure; 7th-10th century; burned clay; from Mantaro Valley; Museum Rietberg (Zürich, Switzerland)
Mozaic figure; 7th–11th century; wood with shell-and-stone inlay & silver; 10.2 x 6.4 x 2.6 cm; from the Wari Empire; Kimbell Art Museum (Fort Worth, Texas, USA)
Sacrificer-shaped container; circa 769–887; wood & cinnabar; Cleveland Museum of Art (USA)
Beaker cups; 9th-11th century; gold; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Cup; 900–1100; Art Institute of Chicago (USA)
Sican headdress mask; 10th-11th century; gold, silver & paint; height: 29.2 cm (11{{fraction|1|2}} in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art
Ceremonial knife (tumi); 10th-13th century; gold, turquoise, greenstone & shell; height: 33 cm (1 ft. 1 in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art
{{center|Closeup of carved stone tenon-head embedded in wall of Tiwanaku's Semi-subterranean Temple}}
{{center|Anthropomorphic receptacle}}
{{center|Ponce stela in the sunken courtyard of the Tiwanaku's Kalasasaya temple}}
Pendant; 4th–10th century; gold; height: 14.6 cm (5{{fraction|3|4}} in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City)
Face-shaped plaque; 7th–12th century; gold; diameter: 1.9 cm (3{{fraction|5|8}} in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art
Male figure-shaped coca chewer on bench; 9th–15th century; ceramic; height: 21.6 cm (8{{fraction|1|2}} in.), width: 10.2 cm (4 in.); Metropolitan Museum of Art
Bowl supported by 3 figures; 850–1500; resist-painted ceramic; height: 28.58 cm (11{{fraction|1|4}} in.), diameter of the bowl: 19.69 cm (7{{fraction|3|4}} in.); from Colombia; Los Angeles County Museum of Art (USA)
<center>Chimú gold apparel, 1300 CE, Larco Museum, Lima, Perú</center>
{{center|Ceramic llama vessel, 1100–1400 CE, Museo de América, Madrid, Spain}}
{{center|Chimu mantle, Late Intermediate Period, 1000–1476 CE, featuring pelicans and tuna}}
Beaded wrist ornament, ca. 1100–1399 CE, hand-ground shell beads, cordage, 4.25 in., Metropolitan Museum of Art
Fragment ofslit tapestry with eccentric weave and applied fringe, 1000–1470, camelid fiber and cotton, 16{{fraction|3|4}} x 18 in., Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Vessel; 1000–1470; earthenware, slip paint; height: 29.6 cm (11.6 in.); diameter: 12.1 cm (4.7 in.); Walters Art Museum
{{center|Hammered and Repoussed gold mural}}
{{center|Inca tunic}}
{{center|Silver and gold Inca statuettes, from the Musee D'Auch}}
Cave painting, Serra da Capivara National Park
<center>Ceramic zoomorphic vase, Santarém culture, Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Belém, Brazil</center>
Tiriyó-Kaxuyana beadwork, Memorial dos Povos Indígenas, Brasília
Enawene-nawe featherwork and body art
German silver hair comb, by Bruce Caeser (Pawnee/Sac & Fox), Oklahoma, 1984, Oklahoma Historical Society
Silver overlay bolo tie by Tommy Singer (Navajo), New Mexico, c. 1980s
Navajo stamped silver belt buckle, collection of Woolaroc
Shell gorget carved by Benny Pokemire (Eastern Band Cherokee)
thumb|left|For Life in all Directions, Roxanne Swentzell (Santa Clara Pueblo), bronze, NMAI
thumb|Pai Tavytera traditional woodcarving, Amambay Department, Paraguay, 2008
thumb|Each/Other by Marie Watt and Cannupa Hanska Luger, 2021

The southwestern United States and certain regions of the Andes have the highest concentration of pictographs (painted images) and Petroglyphs (carved images) from this period.

Painted Cave, Santa Barbara County, California

Rock art of the Chumash people

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Genre of paintings on caves, mountains, cliffs, or other living rock surfaces, created by the Chumash people of Southern California.

Genre of paintings on caves, mountains, cliffs, or other living rock surfaces, created by the Chumash people of Southern California.

Painted Cave, Santa Barbara County, California
Exterior of Painted Cave
Aerial view of Painted Rock
Interior of Painted Cave
Color enhanced Chumash glyphs

Pictographs and petroglyphs are common through interior California, the rock painting tradition thrived until the 19th century.