Piece work

pieceworkpiece ratepiece-ratepiece ratespiece-workpiece workerpiecepiece wagespiece-rate systempiece wage system
Piece work (or piecework) is any type of employment in which a worker is paid a fixed piece rate for each unit produced or action performed, regardless of time.wikipedia
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Employment

employeeemployeremployees
Piece work (or piecework) is any type of employment in which a worker is paid a fixed piece rate for each unit produced or action performed, regardless of time.
Employees work in return for payment, which may be in the form of an hourly wage, by piecework or an annual salary, depending on the type of work an employee does or which sector they are working in.

Salary

salariessalariedsalaried employee
Some of the most prevalent methods are: paid a wage by the hour (known as "time work"); paid an annual salary; salary plus commission (common in sales jobs); base salary or hourly wages plus gratuities (common in service industries); salary plus a possible bonus (used for some managerial or executive positions); salary plus stock options (used for some executives and in start-ups and some high tech firms); salary pool systems; gainsharing (also known as "profit sharing"); paid by the piece – the number of things they make, or tasks they complete (known as ‘output work’); or paid in other ways (known as ‘unmeasured work’).
Even many of the jobs initially created by the Commercial Revolution in the years from 1520 to 1650 and later during Industrialisation in the 18th and 19th centuries would not have been salaried, but, to the extent they were paid as employees, probably paid an hourly or daily wage or paid per unit produced (also called piece work).

Factory system

early industrial revolution factoriesfactoriesfactory labor
In the British factory system, workers mass-produced parts from a fixed design as part of a division of labor, but did not have the advantage of machine tools or metalworking jigs.
Workers were paid either daily wages or for piece work, either in the form of money or some combination of money, housing, meals and goods from a company store (the truck system).

Guild

guildscraft guildtrade guild
As a term and as a common form of labor, 'piece work' had its origins in the guild system of work during the Commercial Revolution and before the Industrial Revolution.
The civil struggles that characterize the 14th-century towns and cities were struggles in part between the greater guilds and the lesser artisanal guilds, which depended on piecework.

Wage

wageswage ratelabor costs
Simply counting the number of pieces produced by a worker was likely easier than accounting for that worker's time, as would have been required for the computation of an hourly wage.
Payment may be calculated as a fixed amount for each task completed (a task wage or piece rate), or at an hourly or daily rate (wage labour), or based on an easily measured quantity of work done.

Industrial Revolution

industrialindustrialismindustrial era
As a term and as a common form of labor, 'piece work' had its origins in the guild system of work during the Commercial Revolution and before the Industrial Revolution.
Merchant capitalists typically provided the raw materials, paid workers by the piece, and were responsible for the sale of the goods.

Sweatshop

sweatshopssweat shopsweated labour
In the mid-19th century, the practice of distributing garment assembly among lower-skilled and lower-paid workers came to be known in Britain as the sweating system and arose at about the same time that a practical (foot-powered) sewing machine, was developed.
The terms sweater for the middleman and sweat system for the process of subcontracting piecework were used in early critiques like Charles Kingsley's Cheap Clothes and Nasty, written in 1850, which described conditions in London, England.

Scientific management

TaylorismTayloristTaylor System
One of the most influential tenets of Scientific Management was Taylor's popularization of the "differential piece rate system", which relied on accurate measurements of productivity rates to create a "standard" production output target.
Thus his compensation plans usually included piece rates.

Performance-related pay

bonusbonusespay for performance
Yasser believes that money is the main incentive for increased productivity and introduced the widely used concept of piece work (known outside business theory since at least 1549.

Wage labour

wage laborlaborlabour
The label "sweatshop" now refers more to long hours, poor working conditions and low pay - even if they pay an hourly or daily wage labour instead of a piece rate.

Workforce

labor forceworkerworkers
Piece work (or piecework) is any type of employment in which a worker is paid a fixed piece rate for each unit produced or action performed, regardless of time.

Gratuity

tiptipstipping
Some of the most prevalent methods are: paid a wage by the hour (known as "time work"); paid an annual salary; salary plus commission (common in sales jobs); base salary or hourly wages plus gratuities (common in service industries); salary plus a possible bonus (used for some managerial or executive positions); salary plus stock options (used for some executives and in start-ups and some high tech firms); salary pool systems; gainsharing (also known as "profit sharing"); paid by the piece – the number of things they make, or tasks they complete (known as ‘output work’); or paid in other ways (known as ‘unmeasured work’).

Minimum wage

minimum wagesminimum-wagefederal minimum wage
Working for a piece rate does not mean that employers are exempt from paying minimum wage or overtime requirements, which vary among nations and states.

Overtime

overtime payextra timeOT
Working for a piece rate does not mean that employers are exempt from paying minimum wage or overtime requirements, which vary among nations and states.

Telemarketing

telemarketertelemarketerstelesales
In a service setting, the output of piece work can be measured by the number of operations completed, as when a telemarketer is paid by the number of calls made or completed, regardless of the outcome of the calls (pay for only certain positive outcomes is more likely to be called a sales commission or incentive pay).

Commission (remuneration)

commissioncommissionscommissioned
In a service setting, the output of piece work can be measured by the number of operations completed, as when a telemarketer is paid by the number of calls made or completed, regardless of the outcome of the calls (pay for only certain positive outcomes is more likely to be called a sales commission or incentive pay).

Crowdsourcing

crowdsourcedcrowd-sourcedcrowdsource
Crowdsourcing systems such as Mechanical Turk involve minute information-processing tasks (such as identifying photos or recognizing signatures) for which workers are compensated on a per-task basis.

Amazon Mechanical Turk

Mechanical TurkAmazon's Mechanical TurkAmazon.com’s Mechanical Turk
Crowdsourcing systems such as Mechanical Turk involve minute information-processing tasks (such as identifying photos or recognizing signatures) for which workers are compensated on a per-task basis.

Commercial Revolution

Commercialcash-starved Europedeficit in silver and gold
As a term and as a common form of labor, 'piece work' had its origins in the guild system of work during the Commercial Revolution and before the Industrial Revolution.

Master craftsman

mastercraftsmancraftsmen
Since the phrase 'piece work' first appears in writing around the year 1549, it is likely that at about this time, the master craftsmen of the guild system began to assign their apprentices work on pieces which could be performed at home, rather than within the master's workshop.

Division of labour

division of laborspecializationspecialised
In the British factory system, workers mass-produced parts from a fixed design as part of a division of labor, but did not have the advantage of machine tools or metalworking jigs.

Machine tool

machine toolstoolingmanufacturing machinery
In the British factory system, workers mass-produced parts from a fixed design as part of a division of labor, but did not have the advantage of machine tools or metalworking jigs.

Metalworking

metalworkmetalworkermetal working
In the British factory system, workers mass-produced parts from a fixed design as part of a division of labor, but did not have the advantage of machine tools or metalworking jigs.

Lathe

lathesreducing lathelathing
Piece work took on new importance with the advent of machine tools, such as the machine lathe in 1751.

American system of manufacturing

American SystemArmory practiceAmerican system of manufactures
Machine tools made possible by the American system of manufacturing (attributed to Eli Whitney) in 1799 in which workers could truly make just a single part—but make many copies of it—for later assembly by others.