Pierre Curie

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Pierre Curie (15 May 1859 – 19 April 1906) was a French physicist, a pioneer in crystallography, magnetism, piezoelectricity and radioactivity.wikipedia
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Piezoelectricity

piezoelectricpiezoelectric effectpiezo-electric
Pierre Curie (15 May 1859 – 19 April 1906) was a French physicist, a pioneer in crystallography, magnetism, piezoelectricity and radioactivity. In 1880 Pierre and his older brother Jacques (1856–1941) demonstrated that an electric potential was generated when crystals were compressed, i.e. piezoelectricity.
French physicists Jacques and Pierre Curie discovered piezoelectricity in 1880.

Henri Becquerel

BecquerelAntoine Henri BecquerelA. Henri Becquerel
In 1903, he received the Nobel Prize in Physics with his wife, Marie Skłodowska-Curie, and Henri Becquerel, "in recognition of the extraordinary services they have rendered by their joint researches on the radiation phenomena discovered by Professor Henri Becquerel".
For work in this field he, along with Marie Skłodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie, received the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics.

Radioactive decay

radioactiveradioactivitydecay mode
Pierre Curie (15 May 1859 – 19 April 1906) was a French physicist, a pioneer in crystallography, magnetism, piezoelectricity and radioactivity. Pierre and Marie Curie's daughter, Irène, and their son-in-law, Frédéric Joliot-Curie, were also physicists involved in the study of radioactivity, and each received Nobel prizes for their work as well.
Further research by Becquerel, Ernest Rutherford, Paul Villard, Pierre Curie, Marie Curie, and others showed that this form of radioactivity was significantly more complicated.

Crystal oscillator

crystalquartz oscillatorquartz crystal
Almost all digital electronic circuits now rely on this in the form of crystal oscillators.
Piezoelectricity was discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.

Curie temperature

Curie pointbelow −183 °CCurie
This is now known as the Curie temperature.
The Curie temperature is named after Pierre Curie, who showed that magnetism was lost at a critical temperature.

Curie's law

Curie-Weiss's law
Pierre Curie studied ferromagnetism, paramagnetism, and diamagnetism for his doctoral thesis, and discovered the effect of temperature on paramagnetism which is now known as Curie's law.
This fact is encapsulated by Curie's law, after Pierre Curie:

Paul-Jacques Curie

Jacques
In 1880 Pierre and his older brother Jacques (1856–1941) demonstrated that an electric potential was generated when crystals were compressed, i.e. piezoelectricity.
Along with his younger brother, Pierre Curie, he studied pyroelectricity in the 1880s, leading to their discovery of some of the mechanisms behind piezoelectricity.

Polonium

Popolonium-210 210 Po
Curie worked with his wife in isolating polonium and radium.
Polonium was discovered in 1898 by Marie and Pierre Curie, when it was extracted from uranium ore and identified solely by its strong radioactivity: it was the first element to be so discovered.

Radium

Raradium-226 226 Ra
Curie worked with his wife in isolating polonium and radium.
Radium, in the form of radium chloride, was discovered by Marie and Pierre Curie in 1898.

Jean-Gustave Bourbouze

When Pierre Curie was preparing for his bachelor of science degree, he worked in the laboratory of Jean-Gustave Bourbouze in the Faculty of Science.
Just before leaving the role of preparer, Bourbouze noticed a young student, Pierre Curie who was preparing his Bachelor of Science degree in the Faculty of Science.

Józef Wierusz-Kowalski

Pierre Curie was introduced to Maria Skłodowska by their friend, physicist Józef Wierusz-Kowalski.
In 1894, he introduced Pierre Curie and Maria Skłodowska.

Curie

Cicuriespicocurie
The curie is a unit of radioactivity (3.7 × 10 10 decays per second or 37 gigabecquerels) originally named in honor of Curie by the Radiology Congress in 1910, after his death.
According to a notice in Nature at the time, it was named in honour of Pierre Curie, but was considered at least by some to be in honour of Marie Curie as well.

ESPCI Paris

École supérieure de physique et de chimie industrielles de la ville de ParisESPCI ParisTechESPCI
Curie and also with M. G. Bémont for their discovery of radium and polonium was honored by a Citation for Chemical Breakthrough Award from the Division of History of Chemistry of the American Chemical Society presented to the ESPCI ParisTech (officially the École supérieure de physique et de chimie industrielles de la Ville de Paris) in 2015.
Pierre and Marie Curie (Physics, 1903),

Irène Joliot-Curie

IrèneCurieCuries
Pierre and Marie Curie's daughter, Irène, and their son-in-law, Frédéric Joliot-Curie, were also physicists involved in the study of radioactivity, and each received Nobel prizes for their work as well.
Irène Joliot-Curie (12 September 1897 – 17 March 1956) was a French and Polish scientist, the daughter of Marie Curie and Pierre Curie and the wife of Frédéric Joliot-Curie.

Becquerel

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The curie is a unit of radioactivity (3.7 × 10 10 decays per second or 37 gigabecquerels) originally named in honor of Curie by the Radiology Congress in 1910, after his death.
The becquerel is named after Henri Becquerel, who shared a Nobel Prize in Physics with Pierre and Marie Curie in 1903 for their work in discovering radioactivity.

Ève Curie

ÈveEwa CurieEve Curie Labouisse
The Curies' other daughter, Ève, wrote a noted biography of her mother.
Ève Curie was the younger daughter of Marie Skłodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie.

Henry Richardson Labouisse Jr.

Henry LabouisseHenry Richardson Labouisse
Ève married Henry Richardson Labouisse, Jr., who received a Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of Unicef in 1965.
The marriage with Ève made him the son-in-law of Marie and Pierre Curie, the Nobel Prize winners.

Spiritualism

spiritualistspiritualistsspiritual
In the late nineteenth century, Pierre Curie was investigating the mysteries of ordinary magnetism when he became aware of the spiritualist experiments of other European scientists, such as Charles Richet and Camille Flammarion.
Nobel laureate Pierre Curie was impressed by the mediumistic performances of Eusapia Palladino and advocated their scientific study.

Eusapia Palladino

Palladino, Eusapia
He did not attend séances such as those of Eusapia Palladino in Paris in 1905–6 as a mere spectator, and his goal certainly was not to communicate with spirits.
In 1905, Eusapia Palladino came to Paris, where Nobel-laureate physicists Pierre Curie and Marie Curie and Nobel-laureate physiologist Charles Richet investigated her amongst other philosophers and scientists such as Henri Bergson and Jacques-Arsène d'Arsonval.

Davy Medal

DavyRoyal Society Davy Medal
Davy Medal, with Marie Curie (1903)
The medal has been awarded to multiple individuals in the same year: in 1882 it was awarded to Dmitri Mendeleev and Julius Lothar Meyer "for their discovery of the periodic relations of the atomic weights"; in 1883 to Marcellin Berthelot and Julius Thomsen "for their researches in thermo-chemistry"; in 1893 to Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff and Joseph Achille Le Bel "In recognition of their introduction of the theory of asymmetric carbon, and its use in explaining the constitution of optically active carbon compounds"; in 1903 to Pierre Curie and Marie Curie "for their researches on radium" and in 1968 to John Cornforth and George Joseph Popják "in recognition of their distinguished joint work on the elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway to polyisoprenoids and steroids".

Curie constant

The material constant in Curie's law is known as the Curie constant.
This equation was first derived by Pierre Curie.

Paul Langevin

LangevinPaul-LangevinLangevin, Paul
Previously a doctoral student of Pierre Curie and later a lover of Marie Curie, he is also famous for his two US patents with Constantin Chilowsky in 1916 and 1917 involving ultrasonic submarine detection.

Curie's Principle

Pierre Curie formulated what is now known as the Curie Dissymmetry Principle: a physical effect cannot have a dissymmetry absent from its efficient cause.
Curie's Principle or Curie's Symmetry Principle, is a maxim about cause and effect formulated by Pierre Curie in 1894: "the symmetries of the causes are to be found in theeffects".

Hélène Langevin-Joliot

Hélène
Pierre and Marie Curie's granddaughter, Hélène Langevin-Joliot, is a professor of nuclear physics at the University of Paris, and their grandson, Pierre Joliot, who was named after Pierre Curie, is a noted biochemist.
Her maternal grandparents were Marie and Pierre Curie, famous for their study of radioactivity, for which they won a Nobel Prize in physics with Henri Becquerel in 1903. Marie Curie is the only person to win Nobel Prizes in two different sciences, her second was awarded in chemistry in (1911) for her discoveries of radium and polonium.

Marie Curie

MarieCurieMaria Skłodowska-Curie
In 1903, he received the Nobel Prize in Physics with his wife, Marie Skłodowska-Curie, and Henri Becquerel, "in recognition of the extraordinary services they have rendered by their joint researches on the radiation phenomena discovered by Professor Henri Becquerel". Curie worked with his wife in isolating polonium and radium. Pierre Curie was introduced to Maria Skłodowska by their friend, physicist Józef Wierusz-Kowalski. Davy Medal, with Marie Curie (1903)
She shared the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics with her husband Pierre Curie and physicist Henri Becquerel.