Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall

Piers GavestonGavestonPiers de GavestonPiers Gaveston, Earl of CornwallPiers Gavestonethe death of Gaveston
Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall (c. 1284 – 19 June 1312) was an English nobleman of Gascon origin, and the favourite of King Edward II of England.wikipedia
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Edward II of England

Edward IIKing Edward IIEdward, Prince of Wales
Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall (c. 1284 – 19 June 1312) was an English nobleman of Gascon origin, and the favourite of King Edward II of England.
Edward had a close and controversial relationship with Piers Gaveston, who had joined his household in 1300.

Favourite

favoriteroyal favouritevalido
Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall (c. 1284 – 19 June 1312) was an English nobleman of Gascon origin, and the favourite of King Edward II of England.
The King's favourite Piers Gaveston is a "night-grown mushrump" (mushroom) to his enemies in Christopher Marlowe's Edward II.

Margaret de Clare

MargaretLady Margaret de ClareMargaret, widow of Piers Gaveston
The prince's partiality for Gaveston was so extravagant that Edward I sent the favourite into exile, but he was recalled a few months later, after the King's death led to the prince's accession as Edward II. Edward bestowed the Earldom of Cornwall on Gaveston, and arranged for him to marry his niece Margaret de Clare, sister of the powerful Earl of Gloucester.
Her two husbands were Piers Gaveston and Hugh de Audley, 1st Earl of Gloucester.

Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick

Earl of WarwickWarwickGuy de Beauchamp
When he did return in 1312, he was hunted down and executed by a group of magnates led by Thomas of Lancaster and Guy de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick. According to one chronicle, he gathered some of his most trusted men around him, including Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln; Guy de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick; and Aymer de Valence, soon to be Earl of Pembroke.
Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick (c. 1272 – 12 August 1315) was an English magnate, and one of the principal opponents of King Edward II and his favourite, Piers Gaveston.

Gilbert de Clare, 8th Earl of Gloucester

Gilbert de Clare4th Earl of GloucesterEarl of Gloucester
The prince's partiality for Gaveston was so extravagant that Edward I sent the favourite into exile, but he was recalled a few months later, after the King's death led to the prince's accession as Edward II. Edward bestowed the Earldom of Cornwall on Gaveston, and arranged for him to marry his niece Margaret de Clare, sister of the powerful Earl of Gloucester.
He was one of the Lords Ordainers who ordered the expulsion of the king's favourite Piers Gaveston in 1311.

Ordinances of 1311

OrdainersOrdinancesLords Ordainers
Upon his return his behaviour became even more offensive, and by the Ordinances of 1311 it was decided that Gaveston should be exiled for a third time, to suffer outlawry if he returned.
Just as instrumental to their conception were other issues, particularly discontent with the king's favourite, Piers Gaveston, whom the barons subsequently banished from the realm.

Edward II (play)

Edward IIEdward the Secondplay of the same name
It was alleged by medieval chroniclers that Edward II and Piers Gaveston were lovers, a rumour that was reinforced by later portrayals in fiction, such as Christopher Marlowe's late 16th-century play Edward II.
Gaveston

Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster

Earl of LancasterThomas of LancasterThomas, Earl of Lancaster
When he did return in 1312, he was hunted down and executed by a group of magnates led by Thomas of Lancaster and Guy de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick.
He despised the royal favourite, Piers Gaveston, who mocked him as "the Fiddler", and swore revenge when Gaveston demanded that the King dismiss one of Lancaster's retainers.

Aymer de Valence, 2nd Earl of Pembroke

Aymer de ValenceAymer de Valence, Earl of PembrokeEarl of Pembroke
According to one chronicle, he gathered some of his most trusted men around him, including Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln; Guy de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick; and Aymer de Valence, soon to be Earl of Pembroke.
Pembroke was one of the Lords Ordainers appointed to restrict the power of Edward II and his favourite Piers Gaveston.

Isabella of France

Queen IsabellaIsabellaIsabel
When Edward II left the country early in 1308 to marry the French king's daughter Isabella, he appointed Gaveston regent in his place.
Her new husband was notorious for the patronage he lavished on his favourite, Piers Gaveston, but the queen supported Edward during these early years, forming a working relationship with Piers and using her relationship with the French monarchy to bolster her own authority and power.

Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March

Roger MortimerMortimerRoger de Mortimer
In 1304, the King awarded Gaveston the wardship of Roger Mortimer of Wigmore, after the death of Mortimer's father, on the request of Edward, Prince of Wales.
Since Mortimer was underage at the death of his father, he was placed by King Edward I under the guardianship of Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall.

Earl of Cornwall

Earldom of CornwallEarl of Cornwall (1225)Earl of Cornwall (1068)
The prince's partiality for Gaveston was so extravagant that Edward I sent the favourite into exile, but he was recalled a few months later, after the King's death led to the prince's accession as Edward II. Edward bestowed the Earldom of Cornwall on Gaveston, and arranged for him to marry his niece Margaret de Clare, sister of the powerful Earl of Gloucester.
*Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall (1284–1312)

Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel

ArundelEdmund Fitzalan9th Earl of Arundel
Here Gaveston and his companions in arms handed a humiliating defeat to the earls of Warenne, Hereford, and Arundel.
After Edward I's death, Arundel became part of the opposition to the new king Edward II, and his favourite Piers Gaveston.

Boulogne agreement

The collective grievances first found expression in the so-called 'Boulogne agreement' of January 1308, in which the earls of Warenne, Hereford, Lincoln and Pembroke expressed concern about oppression of the people and attacks on the honour of the crown.
Particularly his abandonment of the Scottish Wars and his patronage of the unpopular Piers Gaveston caused discontent.

John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey

John de Warenne, Earl of SurreyEarl of SurreyJohn
Here Gaveston and his companions in arms handed a humiliating defeat to the earls of Warenne, Hereford, and Arundel.
He was one of the great nobles offended by the rise of Edward II's favorite Piers Gaveston, and helped secure Gaveston's 1308 banishment.

Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford

Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of HerefordHerefordEarl of Hereford
Here Gaveston and his companions in arms handed a humiliating defeat to the earls of Warenne, Hereford, and Arundel.
In one of the campaigns in Scotland Humphrey evidently grew bored and departed for England to take part in a tournament along with Piers Gaveston and other young barons and knights.

Edward I of England

Edward IKing Edward IPrince Edward
At a young age he made a good impression on King Edward I "Longshanks", and was assigned to the household of the King's son, Edward of Caernarfon.
In particular they should make sure that Piers Gaveston was not allowed to return to the country.

Robert Winchelsey

Archbishop of CanterburyArchbishop WinchelseaArchbishop Winchelsey
Gaveston was not exiled immediately; he did not have to leave the realm until 25 June, but faced excommunication by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Robert Winchelsey, should he return.
Winchelsey soon joined the king's enemies, however, and was the only bishop to object to the return of the king's favourite, Piers Gaveston.

Christopher Marlowe

MarloweC. MarloweChristopher "Kit" Marlowe
It was alleged by medieval chroniclers that Edward II and Piers Gaveston were lovers, a rumour that was reinforced by later portrayals in fiction, such as Christopher Marlowe's late 16th-century play Edward II.
The play was extremely bold, dealing with a star-crossed love story between Edward II and Piers Gaveston.

Walter Langton

Bishop LangtonWalter de LangtonBishop of Coventry
These difficulties first materialised in a dispute between treasurer Walter Langton and Prince Edward.
The accession of Edward II and the return of Langton's enemy, Piers Gaveston, were quickly followed by the arrest of the bishop, his removal from office, and imprisonment at London, Windsor and Wallingford.

Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy

Henry de PercyHenry PercySir Henry Percy
On 4 May, the King and Gaveston were at Newcastle, and barely escaped a force led by Lancaster, Henry Percy and Robert Clifford.
He rebelled against King Edward II over the issue of Piers Gaveston and was imprisoned for a few months.

Margaret of France, Queen of England

Margaret of FranceMargaretMarguerite of France
An arrest order was sent out for the deserters, but, at the insistence of Queen Margaret, they were all pardoned in January 1307.
Margaret was not pleased when Edward II elevated Piers Gaveston to become Earl of Cornwall upon his father's death, since the title had been meant for one of her own sons.

King's Langley Priory

King's LangleyDominican PrioryDominican Priory of Kings Langley
A proper burial could not be arranged while Gaveston was still excommunicate, and it was not until 2 January 1315, after the King had secured a papal absolution for his favourite, that he could have his body buried in an elaborate ceremony at the Dominican foundation of King's Langley Priory; the tomb is now lost.
Possibly, however, the church was not yet finished, for the body of Piers Gaveston, who was killed about this time, was not buried there until the end of 1314, when the ceremony took place with much state, the Archbishop of Canterbury and four bishops as well as many other ecclesiastics taking part in the funeral rites.

Wallingford Castle

Wallingfordcastles at Wallingfordsiege of Wallingford
On 2 December 1307, exactly one month after Gaveston's marriage, the King organised a tournament in Gaveston's honour at Wallingford Castle.
Edward II gave Wallingford Castle first to his royal favourite, Piers Gaveston, and then to his young wife, Isabella of France, with large sums still being spent on the property.

Deddington

Deddington Court HouseDeddington Primary SchoolIlbury
On 9 June, Pembroke left Gaveston at the rectory at Deddington in Oxfordshire, while he himself left to visit his wife.
On 9 June 1312 the Earl of Pembroke was escorting Piers Gaveston, Earl of Cornwall south after Gaveston's surrender to a group of rebellious earls at Scarborough Castle.