Pima Villages

Pimos Villagesvillages
Pima Villages, sometimes mistakenly called the Pimos Villages in the 19th century, were the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and Pee-Posh (Maricopa) villages in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.wikipedia
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Pima people

PimaAkimel O'odhamPima Indians
Pima Villages, sometimes mistakenly called the Pimos Villages in the 19th century, were the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and Pee-Posh (Maricopa) villages in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.
The Hispanic era (A.D.1694–1853) of the Historic period began with the first visit by Father Kino to their villages in 1694.

El Llano, Arizona

Buen Llano
The first village upstream on the Gila River, 36 leagues from Tucson, Buen Llano, population 400; second, 1 league downstream from Buen Llano, El Hormiguero, population 1,200; third, 0.75 leagues downstream from El Hormiguero, La Tierra Amontonada, population 1,200; fourth, 1 league downstream from La Tierra Amontonada, El Apache Parado, population 600; fifth, 1.5 leagues downstream from El Apache Parado, La Agua, population 600; sixth, 7 leagues downstream from La Agua, El Hueso Parado de Pimas y Cocomaricopas, population 900 of mixed Maricopa and Pima people. The census records the Pima Villages as: Buen Llano, Hormiguero, Hormiguerito, Casa Blanca, Cochinilla, Arenal No. The 1860 U. S. census records the Pima Villages and their populations as: Agua Raiz, population 523, Arenal, population 577, Casa Blanca, population 323, Cachanillo, population 504, Cerrito, population 257, Cerro Chiquito, population 232, El Llano, population 394, and Hormiguero, population 510.
El Llano, Spanish for "the plain or open space" or Buen Llano, "good plain", one of the 19th century Pima Villages, was located along the south side of the Gila River, between Sweetwater and Sacaton, in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Casa Blanca, Arizona

Casa BlancaCasa Blanca StationLa Tierra Amontonada
The first village upstream on the Gila River, 36 leagues from Tucson, Buen Llano, population 400; second, 1 league downstream from Buen Llano, El Hormiguero, population 1,200; third, 0.75 leagues downstream from El Hormiguero, La Tierra Amontonada, population 1,200; fourth, 1 league downstream from La Tierra Amontonada, El Apache Parado, population 600; fifth, 1.5 leagues downstream from El Apache Parado, La Agua, population 600; sixth, 7 leagues downstream from La Agua, El Hueso Parado de Pimas y Cocomaricopas, population 900 of mixed Maricopa and Pima people. The 1860 U. S. census records the Pima Villages and their populations as: Agua Raiz, population 523, Arenal, population 577, Casa Blanca, population 323, Cachanillo, population 504, Cerrito, population 257, Cerro Chiquito, population 232, El Llano, population 394, and Hormiguero, population 510.
Casa Blanca, formerly known to the Mexicans as La Tierra Amontonada (The Land Piled Up), named for the Hohokam ruin mound nearby, was one of the Pima Villages on the Gila River in what was then part of the state of Sonora, Mexico.

Hormiguero, Arizona

El Hormiguero
The first village upstream on the Gila River, 36 leagues from Tucson, Buen Llano, population 400; second, 1 league downstream from Buen Llano, El Hormiguero, population 1,200; third, 0.75 leagues downstream from El Hormiguero, La Tierra Amontonada, population 1,200; fourth, 1 league downstream from La Tierra Amontonada, El Apache Parado, population 600; fifth, 1.5 leagues downstream from El Apache Parado, La Agua, population 600; sixth, 7 leagues downstream from La Agua, El Hueso Parado de Pimas y Cocomaricopas, population 900 of mixed Maricopa and Pima people. The census records the Pima Villages as: Buen Llano, Hormiguero, Hormiguerito, Casa Blanca, Cochinilla, Arenal No. The 1860 U. S. census records the Pima Villages and their populations as: Agua Raiz, population 523, Arenal, population 577, Casa Blanca, population 323, Cachanillo, population 504, Cerrito, population 257, Cerro Chiquito, population 232, El Llano, population 394, and Hormiguero, population 510.
Hormiguero, Spanish for "anthill", (also called Ormejera No.1 in an 1858 census, probably a garbled American version of Hormiguero), one of the 19th century Pima Villages, was located along the Gila River, in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Gila Bend, Arizona

Gila BendGila RanchGila Bend, Az
A further 132 Akimel O’odham were in the village of Oyadaibuc to the west near what is now Gila Bend. The first Maricopa village they encountered was now Hueso Parado only 7 leagues below the Pima Villages near the Gila's confluence with the Santa Cruz River, and the next Maricopa village they encountered was 25 leagues down the river near Gila Bend.
By the time of the California Gold Rush the Maricopa villages, were all located east of the Sierra Estrella, on the Gila River, below the Pima Villages.

Agua Raiz

La Agua
The first village upstream on the Gila River, 36 leagues from Tucson, Buen Llano, population 400; second, 1 league downstream from Buen Llano, El Hormiguero, population 1,200; third, 0.75 leagues downstream from El Hormiguero, La Tierra Amontonada, population 1,200; fourth, 1 league downstream from La Tierra Amontonada, El Apache Parado, population 600; fifth, 1.5 leagues downstream from El Apache Parado, La Agua, population 600; sixth, 7 leagues downstream from La Agua, El Hueso Parado de Pimas y Cocomaricopas, population 900 of mixed Maricopa and Pima people. The 1860 U. S. census records the Pima Villages and their populations as: Agua Raiz, population 523, Arenal, population 577, Casa Blanca, population 323, Cachanillo, population 504, Cerrito, population 257, Cerro Chiquito, population 232, El Llano, population 394, and Hormiguero, population 510.
Agua Raiz, Spanish for "Water root" as named in the 1860 Census, it was one of the 19th century Pima Villages, located along the Gila River, near the modern site of Sacate Village, Arizona in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Sacaton (village)

SacatonSocaton VillageSocatoon
Fugitive Maricopa people from villages destroyed in the war, settled above the Pima Villages at Socatoon, which appeared in the first American census soon after its founding.
Sacaton or Socatoon was a village of the Maricopa people, established above the Pima Villages, (now the Gila River Indian Community) after the June 1, 1857, in the Battle of Pima Butte where it appears a few months later in the 1857 Chapman Census.

Southern Emigrant Trail

Gila TrailSouthern Immigrant Trailemigrant trail
In the next years 200,000 victims died of cholera in Mexico, including many in the villages of the Pima and Maricopa along the Southern Emigrant Trail.
Linking there with the Sonora Road to California established by Juan Bautista de Anza in 1774, they marched on a three-day journey north over the desert before linking up with Kearny’s route on the Gila River just east of the Pima Villages.

Hormiguerito, Arizona

Ormejera No.2
The census records the Pima Villages as: Buen Llano, Hormiguero, Hormiguerito, Casa Blanca, Cochinilla, Arenal No.
Hormiguerito, or Ormejera No.2 in an 1858 census, (probably a garbled American version of Hormiguero), one of the smaller 19th century Pima Villages, located along the Gila River, in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Arenal, Arizona

Aranca No.1
The 1860 U. S. census records the Pima Villages and their populations as: Agua Raiz, population 523, Arenal, population 577, Casa Blanca, population 323, Cachanillo, population 504, Cerrito, population 257, Cerro Chiquito, population 232, El Llano, population 394, and Hormiguero, population 510.
Arenal, "sandy place" in Spanish, also known as Aranca No.1 in the 1857 census, was one of the 19th century Pima Villages, located along the Gila River, in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Hueso Parado

The first village upstream on the Gila River, 36 leagues from Tucson, Buen Llano, population 400; second, 1 league downstream from Buen Llano, El Hormiguero, population 1,200; third, 0.75 leagues downstream from El Hormiguero, La Tierra Amontonada, population 1,200; fourth, 1 league downstream from La Tierra Amontonada, El Apache Parado, population 600; fifth, 1.5 leagues downstream from El Apache Parado, La Agua, population 600; sixth, 7 leagues downstream from La Agua, El Hueso Parado de Pimas y Cocomaricopas, population 900 of mixed Maricopa and Pima people. The first Maricopa village they encountered was now Hueso Parado only 7 leagues below the Pima Villages near the Gila's confluence with the Santa Cruz River, and the next Maricopa village they encountered was 25 leagues down the river near Gila Bend.
El Hueso Parado de Pimas y Cocomaricopas, was first mentioned in an 1823 Mexican Army report, as being located 7 leagues (17.5 miles) down the Gila River from the Pima Villages.

Gila River Indian Reservation

Gila RiverPima/Maricopa reservation
The Pima Villages and some of their lands were included in the Gila River Indian Reservation in 1859.
The Pima Villages and some of their lands were included in the Gila River Indian Reservation in 1859.

Maricopa people

MaricopaMaricopa IndiansMaricopas
Pima Villages, sometimes mistakenly called the Pimos Villages in the 19th century, were the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and Pee-Posh (Maricopa) villages in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Gila River Indian Community

Gila River Indian ReservationGila River PimaWild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino
Pima Villages, sometimes mistakenly called the Pimos Villages in the 19th century, were the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and Pee-Posh (Maricopa) villages in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Pinal County, Arizona

Pinal CountyPinalPina
Pima Villages, sometimes mistakenly called the Pimos Villages in the 19th century, were the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and Pee-Posh (Maricopa) villages in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

New Spain

Viceroyalty of New SpainSpanishNueva España
First, recorded by Spanish explorers in the late 17th century as living on the south side of the Gila River, they were included in the Viceroyalty of New Spain, then in Provincias of Sonora, Ostimuri y Sinaloa or New Navarre to 1823.

Provincias Internas

Commandancy General of the Provincias InternasEastern Internal ProvincesInternal Provinces
First, recorded by Spanish explorers in the late 17th century as living on the south side of the Gila River, they were included in the Viceroyalty of New Spain, then in Provincias of Sonora, Ostimuri y Sinaloa or New Navarre to 1823.

New Navarre

Nueva Navarra
First, recorded by Spanish explorers in the late 17th century as living on the south side of the Gila River, they were included in the Viceroyalty of New Spain, then in Provincias of Sonora, Ostimuri y Sinaloa or New Navarre to 1823.

Estado de Occidente

Sonora y SinaloaSonora and SinaloaOccidente State
Then from 1824 to 1830, they were part of the Estado de Occidente of Mexico and from September 1830 they were part of the state of Sonora.

Mexico

MexicanMéxicoMEX
Then from 1824 to 1830, they were part of the Estado de Occidente of Mexico and from September 1830 they were part of the state of Sonora.

Sonora

Sonora, MexicoSonoranSonora State
Then from 1824 to 1830, they were part of the Estado de Occidente of Mexico and from September 1830 they were part of the state of Sonora.

Gila River

GilaGila ValleyGila Basin
These were the Pima villages encountered by American fur trappers, traders, soldiers and travelers along the middle Gila River from 1830's into the later 19th century.

Mexican Cession

cessioncededterritory acquired
The Mexican Cession following the Mexican American War left them part of Mexico.

Mexican–American War

Mexican-American WarMexican WarMexican American War
The Mexican Cession following the Mexican American War left them part of Mexico.

Gadsden Purchase

Gadsden TreatyGadsdenGadsen Purchase
The 1853 Gadsden Purchase made their lands part of the United States, Territory of New Mexico.