Pima Villages

Pimos Villagesvillages
Pima Villages, sometimes mistakenly called the Pimos Villages in the 19th century, were the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and Pee-Posh (Maricopa) villages in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.wikipedia
84 Related Articles

Presidio San Agustín del Tucsón

Presidio San Augustin del TucsonFort Tucsonfort
On August 20, 1775, Presidio San Augustin del Tucson was established to protect the missions and the region of the Santa Cruz River valley generally from the Apache who now began raiding there.

Presidio

Presidiosfortresspresidial
It required universal military service by able bodied males, its warriors trained with fighting skills, organization and efficiency equal to a presidial garrison.

Pedro Font

Padre Pedro Font
This according to Padre Pedro Font's journal in 1775, quoted in Russell's, The Pima Indians, wherein Font says that the Pima Indians of Sutaquison (Sedelmayr's Sudac-sson) were asked the reason for moving their village away from the Gila River bank to open land away from the river.

Alta California

Mexican CaliforniaCaliforniaUpper California
Soon after Mexico achieved its independence, interest in reopening land communications with Alta California was revived with the arrival of a Dominican missionary, Father Félix Caballero, in Tucson in 1823.

Félix Caballero

Soon after Mexico achieved its independence, interest in reopening land communications with Alta California was revived with the arrival of a Dominican missionary, Father Félix Caballero, in Tucson in 1823.

Misión Santa Catarina Virgen y Mártir

Santa CatarinaArroyo de Santa Catarina
He and three companions walked from Misión Santa Catarina Virgen y Mártir in Baja California, crossing the Colorado River among the Cocopah.

Baja California

Baja California NorteBajaBaja California, Mexico
He and three companions walked from Misión Santa Catarina Virgen y Mártir in Baja California, crossing the Colorado River among the Cocopah.

Cocopah

CocopaCocopah peopleCucapá
He and three companions walked from Misión Santa Catarina Virgen y Mártir in Baja California, crossing the Colorado River among the Cocopah.

Brevet (military)

brevetbrevettedbrevet rank
A military expedition under Brevet Captain José Romero, commander of the Tucson presidio, was organized to return the priest to his mission and pioneer a route to the Californias.

Santa Cruz River (Arizona)

Santa Cruz RiverSanta CruzSanta Cruz Valley
The first Maricopa village they encountered was now Hueso Parado only 7 leagues below the Pima Villages near the Gila's confluence with the Santa Cruz River, and the next Maricopa village they encountered was 25 leagues down the river near Gila Bend.

California Gold Rush

Gold RushForty-niners49er
By the time of the California Gold Rush the Maricopa villages, were all located east of the Sierra Estrella, on the Gila River, below the Pima Villages.

Benjamin Ignatius Hayes

Benjamin HayesBenjamin I. HayesHayes
In December 1849, Benjamin Ignatius Hayes who was traveling to California through the Pima Villages, wrote in the diary of is trip to California:

Cholera

Asiatic choleracholera epidemicA cholera epidemic breaks out
Unfortunately with the forty-niners came cholera, transmitted from Europe to places like New York and New Orleans, then to Missouri or Texas where it claimed many lives, then by trails through the Southwest and Northern Mexico to California.

Battle of Pima Butte

engagement at Pima Butte
Even after they had moved to the vicinity of the Pima Villages, the Maricopa were attacked by the Yuma and their allies, but for the last time, when the coalition of their enemies were defeated on June 1, 1857 in the Battle of Pima Butte by the allied army of Pima - Maricopa warriors.

Alfred Chapman

A. B. ChapmanAlfred B. ChapmanAlfred Beck Chapman
A few months after the Battle of Pima Butte, Lieutenant A. B. Chapman, First Dragoons, U. S. Army made the first U. S. census of the Maricopas, Pimas and Papagos which was submitted to and appeared in the report of G. Bailey, Special Agent Indian Department.

Butterfield Overland Mail

Butterfield Overland StageButterfield StageOverland Mail
An Indian Agency was established at Casa Blanca with Silas St. John, (station agent of the Butterfield Overland Mail at Casa Blanca Station), appointed on February 18, 1859, as Special Agent for the Pima and Maricopa Indians.

History of Arizona

historyArizonaArizona history
The Pima Villages often sold fresh food and provided relief to distressed travelers among this throng and to others in subsequent years.

Fort Barrett

Pima Villages
It was located in the Pima Villages two miles from the Gila river nearby Casa Blanca, New Mexico Territory and was built around the mill of settler Ammi M. White to protect it and provide a safe location to gather food and forage from the Pima people for the advance on Tucson.

Nugent’s Pass

The pass was named for John Nugent, who provided notes of his journey with a party of Forty-Niners across what became the Tucson Cutoff to Lt. John G. Parke, on expedition to identify a feasible railroad route from the Pima Villages to the Rio Grande.

White's Mill (Casa Blanca, Arizona)

White's Millmill
It was located among the Pima Villages near the Butterfield Overland Mail station, at what is now Casa Blanca, Arizona, during the American Civil War.

Paraje

One was the jornada between Tucson and the Pima Villages on the Gila River.

Cachanillo, Arizona

Cachanillo, a derivative of Cachanilla in Spanish, being an arrowweed or Pluchea sericea (a rhizomatous evergreen shrub), was one of the 19th century Pima Villages, located along the Gila River, in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Edwin Augustus Rigg

Edwin A. Rigg
While its commander he saw to the gathering of supplies of food and forage for the advance of the California Column between the Fort and the Pima Villages with the help of Ammi M. White.