Pineapple Express

rains of 2005
Pineapple Express is a non-technical term for a meteorological phenomenon characterized by a strong and persistent flow of atmospheric moisture and associated with heavy precipitation from the waters adjacent to the Hawaiian Islands and extending to any location along the Pacific coast of North America.wikipedia
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Atmospheric river

atmospheric
A Pineapple Express is an example of an atmospheric river, which is a more general term for such narrow corridors of enhanced water vapor transport at mid-latitudes around the world.
Pineapple Express storms are the most commonly represented and recognized type of atmospheric rivers; they are given the name due to the warm water vapor plumes originating over the Hawaiian tropics that follow a path towards California.

Great Coastal Gale of 2007

2007a major storman intense tropical rainstorm
Examples of this are the Christmas flood of 1964, Willamette Valley Flood of 1996, New Year's Day Flood of 1997, January 2006 Flood in Northern California, Great Coastal Gale of 2007, January 2009 Flood in Washington, and the January 2012 Flood in Oregon.
On November 29, 2007, a strong low pressure system, fed by the remnants of Typhoon Mitag and Typhoon Hagibis, formed in the central Pacific Ocean, and was carried via the Pineapple Express to the Pacific Northwest.

Chinook wind

Chinookchinook windschinooks
After being drained of their moisture, the tropical air masses reach the inland prairies as a Chinook wind or simply "a Chinook", a term which is also synonymous in the Pacific Northwest with the Pineapple Express.
The winds are also known as the pineapple express, since they are of tropical origin, roughly from the area of the Pacific near Hawaii.

December 2014 North American storm complex

a powerful storm complexa powerful winter stormadditional rainfall in December 2014
In December 2014, a powerful winter storm fueled by a Pineapple Express hit Northern California, resulting in snow, wind, and flood watches.
Fueled by the Pineapple Express, an atmospheric river originating in the tropical waters of the Pacific Ocean adjacent to the Hawaiian Islands, the storm was the strongest to affect California since January 2010.

December 2010 North American blizzard

December 2010a blizzarda Pineapple Express system
In December 2010, a Pineapple Express system ravaged California from December 15 through December 22, bringing with it as much as 2 ft of rain to the San Gabriel Mountains and over 13 ft of snow in the Sierra Nevada.
During the next few days, the system rapidly intensified, while channeling smaller winter storms and moisture from the Pineapple Express atmospheric river in the west coast of North America, before approaching the North American west coast itself on December 8.

Madden–Julian oscillation

Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO)Madden–Julian oscillatory period
The conditions are often created by the Madden–Julian oscillation, an equatorial rainfall pattern which feeds its moisture into this pattern.
3) The heavy precipitation event: As the pattern of enhanced tropical rainfall continues to shift further to the east and weaken, the deep tropical moisture plume extends from the subtropical central Pacific into the mid latitude trough now located off the west coast of North America. The jet stream at upper levels extends across the North Pacific with the mean jet position entering North America in the northwestern United States. The deep low pressure located near the Pacific Northwest coast can bring up to several days of heavy rain and possible flooding. These events are often referred to as Pineapple Express events, so named because a significant amount of the deep tropical moisture traverses the Hawaiian Islands on its way towards western North America.

Global storm activity of 2006

2006–07 North American winter storms2005–06 North American winter stormsAnother blizzard
The Puget Sound region from Olympia, Washington to Vancouver, BC received several inches of rain per day in November 2006 from a series of successive Pineapple Express storms that caused massive flooding in all major regional rivers and mudslides which closed the mountain passes.
The Puget Sound area received a Pineapple Express that dumped several inches of rain over the area in a period of four days caused massive flooding, two deaths, and extensive damage to Mount Rainier National Park.

Pacific Organized Track System

Pacific Organised Track System
Pacific Organized Track System
Pineapple Express

Hawaiian Islands

Sandwich IslandsHawaiiHawaiian
Pineapple Express is a non-technical term for a meteorological phenomenon characterized by a strong and persistent flow of atmospheric moisture and associated with heavy precipitation from the waters adjacent to the Hawaiian Islands and extending to any location along the Pacific coast of North America.

Jet stream

jetstreampolar jet streamsubtropical jet stream
A Pineapple Express is driven by a strong, southern branch of the polar jet stream and is marked by the presence of a surface frontal boundary which is typically either slow or stationary, with waves of low pressure traveling along its axis.

Weather front

frontal systemfrontal boundaryfront
A Pineapple Express is driven by a strong, southern branch of the polar jet stream and is marked by the presence of a surface frontal boundary which is typically either slow or stationary, with waves of low pressure traveling along its axis.

El Niño

El NinoEl Niño Southern OscillationEl Niño-Southern Oscillation
They are also present during an El Niño episode.

Orography

orographicorographicallyorographic precipitation
The composition of moisture-laden air, atmospheric dynamics, and orographic enhancement resulting from the passage of this air over the mountain ranges of the western coast of North America causes some of the most torrential rains to occur in the region.

Christmas flood of 1964

19641964 FloodChristmas flood
Examples of this are the Christmas flood of 1964, Willamette Valley Flood of 1996, New Year's Day Flood of 1997, January 2006 Flood in Northern California, Great Coastal Gale of 2007, January 2009 Flood in Washington, and the January 2012 Flood in Oregon.

Willamette Valley flood of 1996

flooding in the Willamette Valley19961996 flood
Examples of this are the Christmas flood of 1964, Willamette Valley Flood of 1996, New Year's Day Flood of 1997, January 2006 Flood in Northern California, Great Coastal Gale of 2007, January 2009 Flood in Washington, and the January 2012 Flood in Oregon.

Great Flood of 1862

flood in 1861flood of 1861great flood of the Willamette River
In addition to a sudden snow melt, some places received an estimated 8.5 ft of rain, leading to the worst flooding in recorded history of California, Oregon, and Nevada, known as the Great Flood of 1862.

San Francisco Bay Area

Bay AreaSan FranciscoSan Francisco Bay
The San Francisco Bay Area is another locale along the Pacific Coast which is occasionally affected by a Pineapple Express.

Sierra Nevada (U.S.)

Sierra NevadaSierra Nevada MountainsSierra Nevada foothills
In December 2010, a Pineapple Express system ravaged California from December 15 through December 22, bringing with it as much as 2 ft of rain to the San Gabriel Mountains and over 13 ft of snow in the Sierra Nevada. The same storms brought a blizzard of heavy, wet snow to the Sierra Nevada Mountains, notoriously stranding the train City of San Francisco on January 13.

City of San Francisco (train)

City of San FranciscoCity of San Francisco'' (train)City of San Francisco''.
The same storms brought a blizzard of heavy, wet snow to the Sierra Nevada Mountains, notoriously stranding the train City of San Francisco on January 13.

Sacramento Valley

SacramentoSacramento Regioncentral valley
The greatest flooding in Northern California since the 1800s occurred in 1955 as a result of a series of Hawaiian storms, with the greatest damage in the Sacramento Valley around Yuba City.

Yuba City, California

Yuba CityYubaUnited States
The greatest flooding in Northern California since the 1800s occurred in 1955 as a result of a series of Hawaiian storms, with the greatest damage in the Sacramento Valley around Yuba City.

Southern California

southernSoCalCalifornia
A Pineapple Express battered Southern California from January 7 through January 11, 2005.

1997–98 El Niño event

1997–98similarly strong1997 North American winter storms
This storm was the largest to hit Southern California since the storms that hit during the 1997–98 El Niño event.

Flood

floodingfloodsflood control
The storm caused mud slides and flooding, with one desert location just north of Morongo Valley receiving about 9 in of rain, and some locations on south and southwest-facing mountain slopes receiving spectacular totals: San Marcos Pass, in Santa Barbara County, received 24.57 in, and Opids Camp (AKA Camp Hi-Hill) in the San Gabriel Mountains of Los Angeles County was deluged with 31.61 in of rain in the five-day period.