Pinwright's Progress

Pinwright's Progress was a British sitcom that aired on the BBC Television Service from 1946 to 1947 and was the world's first regular half-hour televised sitcom.wikipedia
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Sitcom

situation comedysitcomssituation comedies
Pinwright's Progress was a British sitcom that aired on the BBC Television Service from 1946 to 1947 and was the world's first regular half-hour televised sitcom.
There were prior examples on radio, but the first television sitcom is said to be Pinwright's Progress, ten episodes being broadcast on the BBC in the United Kingdom between 1946 and 1947.

Kaleidoscope (TV series)

KaleidoscopeKaleidoscope'' (TV series)
The ten episodes, which aired fortnightly in alternation with Kaleidoscope, were broadcast live from the BBC studios at Alexandra Palace.
Initially, it was a thirty-minute broadcast airing every other week, alternating with the early sitcom Pinwright's Progress, but later in its run, the episodes increased to one hour.

James Hayter (actor)

James Hayter
James Hayter as Mr J. Pinwright
His 1946 television series Pinwright's Progress, shown on the BBC, is recognised as the first real example of the half-hour situation comedy format in the history of British television.

Leonard Sharp

Leonard Sharp as Ralph
He starred in the 1946 BBC television series Pinwright's Progress as the messenger "boy" Ralph, who is a deaf octogenarian.

BBC One

BBC1BBC 1BBC Television Service
Pinwright's Progress was a British sitcom that aired on the BBC Television Service from 1946 to 1947 and was the world's first regular half-hour televised sitcom.

Live television

livelive broadcastbroadcast live
The ten episodes, which aired fortnightly in alternation with Kaleidoscope, were broadcast live from the BBC studios at Alexandra Palace.

BBC

British Broadcasting Corporationthe BBCBBC Music
The ten episodes, which aired fortnightly in alternation with Kaleidoscope, were broadcast live from the BBC studios at Alexandra Palace.

Alexandra Palace

LondonAlexandra Palace, London, UKLondon Alexandra Palace
The ten episodes, which aired fortnightly in alternation with Kaleidoscope, were broadcast live from the BBC studios at Alexandra Palace.

John Glyn-Jones

Pinwright's Progress was written by Rodney Hobson, produced and directed by John Glyn-Jones and the script editor was Ted Kavanagh, who also wrote the BBC radio comedy series It's That Man Again.

Script editor

story editorscript editscript editing
Pinwright's Progress was written by Rodney Hobson, produced and directed by John Glyn-Jones and the script editor was Ted Kavanagh, who also wrote the BBC radio comedy series It's That Man Again.

Ted Kavanagh

Pinwright's Progress was written by Rodney Hobson, produced and directed by John Glyn-Jones and the script editor was Ted Kavanagh, who also wrote the BBC radio comedy series It's That Man Again.

BBC Radio

BBCradioBBC National Radio
Pinwright's Progress was written by Rodney Hobson, produced and directed by John Glyn-Jones and the script editor was Ted Kavanagh, who also wrote the BBC radio comedy series It's That Man Again.

It's That Man Again

ITMA
Pinwright's Progress was written by Rodney Hobson, produced and directed by John Glyn-Jones and the script editor was Ted Kavanagh, who also wrote the BBC radio comedy series It's That Man Again.

Oxford University Press

OUPOxfordClarendon Press
Vahimagi, Tise. British Television: An Illustrated Guide. Oxford University Press / British Film Institute, 1994. ISBN: 0-19-818336-4.

British Film Institute

BFIBFI Film FundBritish Film Institute (BFI)
Vahimagi, Tise. British Television: An Illustrated Guide. Oxford University Press / British Film Institute, 1994. ISBN: 0-19-818336-4.

Mark Lewisohn

Lewisohn, Mark
Mark Lewisohn, "Radio Times Guide to TV Comedy", BBC Worldwide Ltd, 2003

British sitcom

sitcomsitcomsBritcom
The first British television sitcom was Pinwright's Progress, broadcast by the BBC from 1946 to 1947, but the form did not take off until the transfer of Hancock's Half Hour from BBC radio in 1956.

1946 in British television

1946
*29 November – Pinwright's Progress, British television's first sitcom, debuts on the BBC Television Service.

Wiping

wipedlostdestroyed
Historical 'firsts' from this era; the world's earliest television crime drama Telecrime (1938–39 and 1946) or Pinwright's Progress (1946–47, the world's first regular situation comedy), only remain visually as a handful of still photographs.

Television comedy

comedycomedy seriestelevision
The first television sitcom was Pinwright's Progress, ten episodes being broadcast on the BBC between 1946 - 1947.

1947–48 United States network television schedule

1947-48 United States network television schedulePrime Time
Although television was still in its infancy, several notable series debuted during this season, particularly Mary Kay and Johnny (first sitcom to be broadcast on network television in the US, and likely the world's second television sitcom after British series Pinwright's Progress), Texaco Star Theatre (the variety show that made Milton Berle TV's first star) and The Ed Sullivan Show (which would run until 1971, with performances by Elvis Presley and The Beatles being among the highest-viewed moments in American television history).

Lost television broadcast

lostlost episodelost episodes
Early BBC-created programmes from the 1930s and 1940s such as Telecrimes, Pinwright's Progress, The Disorderly Room, Sports Review, Theatre Parade, and the play Wasp's Nest, were usually shown live and not recorded. The only visual evidence of these programmes today consists of still photographs.

1946 in television

1946
November 29 – Pinwright's Progress (UK), British television's first situation comedy, debuts on the BBC Television Service (1946–1947).

Timeline of the BBC Television Service

29 November – Pinwright's Progress, British television's first sitcom, debuts on the BBC Television Service.