Pipil peoplewikipedia
[[File:NATIVE AMERICAN INDIGENOUS PEOPLE OF EL SALVADOR IN CENTRAL AMERICA ISTHMUS.png|thumb|right|Map of El Salvador's Native American civilizations and their kingdoms:
PipilPipil-NicaraoPipilsCuzcatlecsPipil-NicaraosPipil tribesPipil IndiansPipil IndianPipil people

El Salvador

SalvadoranEl SalvadorSalvador
The Pipils or Cuzcatlecs are an indigenous people who live in western El Salvador, which they call Cuzcatlan.
El Salvador was for centuries inhabited by several Mesoamerican nations, especially the Cuzcatlecs, as well as the Lenca and Maya.

Nicaragua

NicaraguaRepublic of NicaraguaNicaraguan
The Pipil language is a Uto-Toltec or Uto-Nicarao dialect of the Nahuan languages branch, a dialect chain that stretches from Utah in the United States down through El Salvador to Nicaragua in Central America. Later, he arrived at the now ruined Maya site of Copán in Honduras and subsequently went to the environs of the present Nicaragua, where he established the people known as Nicarao.
The Pipil-Nicarao people were a branch of Nahuas who spoke the Nahuat dialect, and like the Chorotegas, they too had come from Chiapas to Nicaragua in approximately 1200 CE. Prior to that, the Pipil-Nicaraos had been associated with the Toltec civilization.

Cuzcatlan

Cuzcatlán
The Pipils or Cuzcatlecs are an indigenous people who live in western El Salvador, which they call Cuzcatlan.
Cuzcatlan (Nawat: Kuskatan) was a pre-Columbian Nahua state of the postclassical period that extended from the Paz river to the Lempa river (covering most of the western and central zones of the present Republic of El Salvador), this was the nation that Spanish chroniclers came to call the Pipils/Cuzcatlecs.

Nahuatl

NahuatlnáhuatlNahua
Their language is called Nahuat or Pipil, related to the Toltec people of the Nahuatl Nation.
The Pipil people of El Salvador do not call their own language "Pipil", as most linguists do, but rather nawat.

Central America

CentralCentral AmericaCentral American
The Pipil language is a Uto-Toltec or Uto-Nicarao dialect of the Nahuan languages branch, a dialect chain that stretches from Utah in the United States down through El Salvador to Nicaragua in Central America.
Beginning with his arrival in Soconusco in 1523, Alvarado's forces systematically conquered and subjugated most of the major Maya kingdoms, including the K'iche', Tz'utujil, Pipil, and the Kaqchikel.

Pipil grammar

This article provides a grammar sketch of the Nawat or Pipil language, an endangered language spoken by the Pipils of western El Salvador, belonging to the Nahua group within the Uto-Aztecan language family.

Nicarao people

Nicarao
Later, he arrived at the now ruined Maya site of Copán in Honduras and subsequently went to the environs of the present Nicaragua, where he established the people known as Nicarao.
Around 1200 AD, the Nicarao split from the Pipil people and moved into what is now Nicaragua.

Battle of Acajutla

Legend has it that a Pipil Cacique or King named Atlacatl and his son Prince Atonal led the Pipil forces against first contact with the Spanish, the most famous battle being the Battle of Acajutla.
The Battle of Acajutla was a battle on June 8, 1524, between the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Alvarado and the standing army of Cuscatlan Pipils, an indigenous state, in the neighborhood of present-day Acajutla, near the coast of western El Salvador.

1932 Salvadoran peasant massacre

1932 Salvadoran peasant uprising1932 Salvadoran peasant massacreLa Matanza
The exact number of speakers is difficult to determine because native speakers do not wish to be identified due to historic government repression of aboriginal Salvadoreños, such as La Matanza ("The Massacre") of 1932.
This area was heavily populated by the indigenous Pipils.

Pipil language

PipilNawatNahuat
The Pipil language is a Uto-Toltec or Uto-Nicarao dialect of the Nahuan languages branch, a dialect chain that stretches from Utah in the United States down through El Salvador to Nicaragua in Central America. Their language is called Nahuat or Pipil, related to the Toltec people of the Nahuatl Nation.

Pedro de Alvarado

AlvaradoPedro of AlvaradoPedro
Pedro de Alvarado, a lieutenant of Hernán Cortés, led the first Spanish invasion in June 1524.
Spanish efforts were firmly resisted by the indigenous people known as the Pipil and their Mayan speaking neighbors.

Mesoamerica

mesoamericaMesoamericanMeso-American
The Pipil resided in El Salvador, while the Ch'orti' were in eastern Guatemala and northwestern Honduras.

Fray Juan de Torquemada

Juan de TorquemadaTorquemadade Torquemada, Fray Juan
It is considered an especially important source on the Mexica, Totonac, Pipil and Nicoya cultures.

Outline of El Salvador

Outline
The area was originally called by the Pipil "Cuzhcatl", in Spanish "Cuzcatlan", which in Nahuatl means "The Land Of Precious Things".

Salvadoran cuisine

SalvadoranSalvadoran cuisine Salvadoran dish
The traditional cuisine consists of food from Native American cuisine, indigenous Lenca, Pipil and European Spanish peoples.

Spanish conquest of El Salvador

Spanish conquestentered what is now El Salvadorexpedition to Cuzcatlan
Before the conquest the country formed a part of the Mesoamerican cultural region, and was inhabited by a number of indigenous peoples, including the Pipil, the Lenca, the Xinca, and Maya.

History of El Salvador

El Salvadoroligarchycountry's violent past
The history of El Salvador begins with several Mesoamerican nations, especially the Cuzcatlecs, as well as the Lenca and Maya.

Music of El Salvador

El Salvadormusic of El SalvadorSalvadoran musician
The music of El Salvador has a mixture of Lenca, Cacaopera, Mayan, Pipil, and Spanish influences.

San Salvador Historic Downtown

The settlement was relocated in 1545 to the valley known by the native Pipils as Zalcuatitán, and renamed "Valle de las Hamacas" by the Spaniards.

Spanish conquest of Honduras

conquer HondurasHondurasSpanish conquest conquer Honduras
Indigenous groups included Maya, Lenca, Pech, Miskito, Sumu, Jicaque, Pipil and Chorotega.

El Salvador–Spain relations

In 1524, Spanish explorer and conquistador Pedro de Alvarado launched a campaign against the Pipil people, the native inhabitants of Cuzcatlán (present day El Salvador).

Mataquescuintla

The first settlers in Mataquescuintla were Pipils that came from the province of El Salvador.

Nicaraguans

NicaraguanNicaraguaNicas
In the western region, the Nahua people (also known as the Pipil-Nicaraos) were present along with other groups such as the Chorotega people.

Feliciano Ama

José Feliciano Ama (1881 – February 28, 1932) was an indigenous peasant leader, a Pipil from Izalco in El Salvador, who participated and died in the 1932 Salvadoran peasant uprising.

Nahuas

NahuaNahuasNahuatl
The last of the southern Nahua populations are the Pipil of El Salvador.