Pitcher

PpitchedpitchingpitchersRHPbaseball pitcherRight-handed pitcherRH pitcherLHPpitch
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk.wikipedia
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Baseball

playerbaseball playerbaseball team
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk.
The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat.

Catcher

Ccatchingcatchers
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk.
When a batter takes his/her turn to hit, the catcher crouches behind home plate, in front of the (home) umpire, and receives the ball from the pitcher.

Batting (baseball)

batterbattersbatting
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk.
In baseball, batting is the act of facing the opposing pitcher and trying to produce offense for one's team.

Baseball (ball)

baseballbaseballsball
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk.
Pitchers usually made their own balls, which were used throughout the game, softening and coming unraveled as the game went on. One of the more popular earlier ball designs was the "lemon peel ball," named after its distinct four lines of stitching design.

Designated hitter

DHdesignated hitter ruleDH rule
Starting in 1973 with the American League and spreading to further leagues throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the hitting duties of the pitcher have generally been given over to the position of designated hitter, a cause of some controversy.
The rule allows teams to have one player, known as the designated hitter (or DH), to bat in place of the pitcher.

Strikeout

strikeoutsstruck outstriking out
Generally, power pitchers record a high percentage of strikeouts.
A strikeout is a statistic recorded for both pitchers and batters, and is denoted by K. A strikeout looking is denoted by a ꓘ.

Power pitcher

fireballerpowerpower pitching
A power pitcher is one who relies on the velocity of his pitches to succeed.
Power pitcher is a term in baseball for a pitcher who relies on the velocity of his pitches, sometimes at the expense of accuracy.

Battery (baseball)

batterybatterymatebatteries
Together, the pitcher and catcher are known as the battery.
In baseball, the term battery refers collectively to the pitcher and the catcher, who may also be called batterymen or batterymates of one another.

Relief pitcher

reliefrelieverrelieved
The starting pitcher begins the game, and he may be followed by various relief pitchers, such as the long reliever, the left-handed specialist, the middle reliever, the setup man, and/or the closer.
In baseball and softball, a relief pitcher or reliever is a pitcher who enters the game after the starting pitcher is removed due to injury, ineffectiveness, fatigue, ejection, or for other strategic reasons, such as inclement weather delays or pinch hitter substitutions.

Starting pitcher

startsstarterstart
The starting pitcher begins the game, and he may be followed by various relief pitchers, such as the long reliever, the left-handed specialist, the middle reliever, the setup man, and/or the closer.
In baseball (hardball or softball), a starting pitcher or starter is the first pitcher in the game for each team.

American League

ALAmericanAmerican League (AL)
Starting in 1973 with the American League and spreading to further leagues throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the hitting duties of the pitcher have generally been given over to the position of designated hitter, a cause of some controversy.
Under the rule, a team may use a batter in its lineup who is not in the field defensively, replacing the pitcher in the batting order, compared to the old rule that made it mandatory for the pitcher to bat.

Control pitcher

controlfinesse pitchercontrol-type pitchers
A control pitcher succeeds by throwing accurate pitches and thus records few walks.
In baseball, a control pitcher, also known as a finesse pitcher, is a pitcher who succeeds mostly by using accurate pitches, as opposed to a power pitcher who relies on velocity.

Fastball

fast ballfastballs4-seam fastball
The most basic pitch is a fastball, where the pitcher throws the ball as hard as he can.
The fastball is the most common type of pitch thrown by pitchers in baseball and softball.

Aroldis Chapman

ChapmanA. ChapmanChampan
Some pitchers are able to throw a fastball at a speed over 100 mph, ex., Aroldis Chapman.
Albertín Aroldis Chapman de la Cruz (born February 28, 1988 ) is a Cuban-born American professional baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB).

Baseball rubbing mud

Delaware River mud formulamudrubbing mud
In Major League Baseball, every team uses Baseball Rubbing Mud to rub game balls in before their pitchers use them in games.
Baseball rubbing mud is mud used to treat balls in the sport of baseball to give pitchers better control and a firmer grip on the balls.

Cut fastball

cuttercutterscut
Other common types of pitches are the curveball, slider, changeup, cutter, sinker, screwball, forkball, split-fingered fastball, slurve, and knuckleball.
In baseball, a cut fastball or cutter is a type of fastball that breaks toward the pitcher's glove-hand side, as it reaches home plate.

Sinker (baseball)

sinkersinkerballersinking fastball
Other common types of pitches are the curveball, slider, changeup, cutter, sinker, screwball, forkball, split-fingered fastball, slurve, and knuckleball.
Pitchers who use the sinker tend to rely on it heavily and do not need to change pitch speeds as much as other pitchers do because the sinking action induces weak bat contact.

Defensive spectrum

most demanding
The pitcher is often considered the most important player on the defensive side of the game, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum.
Designated hitter – First baseman – Left fielder – Right fielder – Third baseman – Center fielder – Second baseman – Shortstop – Catcher – Pitcher

Pitching position

winduppitching motionsset position
There are two legal pitching positions, the windup and the set position or stretch.
A pitcher is in the windup when, with the ball, the pitcher stands on or directly in front of the pitching rubber, located at the top of the mound, with his feet pointing toward home plate.

Slurve

slurvey breaking ball
Other common types of pitches are the curveball, slider, changeup, cutter, sinker, screwball, forkball, split-fingered fastball, slurve, and knuckleball.
The slurve is a baseball pitch in which the pitcher throws a curve ball as if it were a slider.

Knuckleball

knuckleballerknuckle ballknuckler
Other common types of pitches are the curveball, slider, changeup, cutter, sinker, screwball, forkball, split-fingered fastball, slurve, and knuckleball.
This makes the pitch difficult for batters to hit, but also difficult for pitchers to control and catchers to catch; umpires are challenged as well, as the ball's irregular motion through the air makes it harder to call balls and strikes.

Win–loss record (pitching)

Win–loss recordwinsWin-Loss record
In baseball statistics, for each game, one pitcher will be credited with winning the game, and one pitcher will be charged with losing it. This is not necessarily the starting pitchers for each team, however, as a reliever can get a win and the starter would then get a no-decision.
In baseball and softball, a pitcher's win–loss record (also referred to simply as their record) indicates the number of wins (denoted "W") and losses (denoted "L") they have been credited with.

Pitch (baseball)

pitchpitchespitching
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk.
Pitchers throw a variety of pitches, each of which has a slightly different velocity, trajectory, movement, hand position, wrist position and/or arm angle.

Changeup

change-upchange upchange
Other common types of pitches are the curveball, slider, changeup, cutter, sinker, screwball, forkball, split-fingered fastball, slurve, and knuckleball.
The changeup is thrown with the same arm action as a fastball, but at a lower speed due to the pitcher holding the ball in a special grip.

Screwball

fade-awayscrew with a ballscrewball pitch
Other common types of pitches are the curveball, slider, changeup, cutter, sinker, screwball, forkball, split-fingered fastball, slurve, and knuckleball.
When thrown by a right-handed pitcher, a screwball breaks from left to right from the point of view of the pitcher; the pitch therefore moves down and in on a right-handed batter and down and away from a left-handed batter.