Plasma display

plasmaplasma TVplasma screenplasma televisionplasma display panelplasma displaysplasma screensplasma televisionsgas-plasma displayPDP
A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display that uses small cells containing plasma; ionized gas that responds to electric fields.wikipedia
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Plasma (physics)

plasmaplasma physicsplasmas
A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display that uses small cells containing plasma; ionized gas that responds to electric fields.
The response of plasma to electromagnetic fields is used in many modern technological devices, such as plasma televisions or plasma etching.

Large-screen television technology

projection televisionlarge-screen televisiontelevision technology
With the trend toward large-screen television technology, the 32 inch screen size is rapidly disappearing.
Various thin screen technologies are being developed, but only the liquid crystal display (LCD), plasma display (PDP) and Digital Light Processing (DLP) have been released on the public market.

Cathode-ray tube

cathode ray tubeCRTcathode ray tubes
Competing display technologies include cathode ray tube (CRT), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), AMLCD, Digital Light Processing DLP, SED-tv, LED display, field emission display (FED), and quantum dot display (QLED).
Since the late 2000s, CRTs have been largely superseded by newer "flat panel" display technologies such as LCD, plasma display, and OLED displays, which in the case of LCD and OLED displays have lower manufacturing costs and power consumption, as well as significantly less weight and bulk.

LED-backlit LCD

LED TVLED-backlitLED backlighting
(As plasma panels are locally lit and do not require a back light, blacks are blacker on plasma and grayer on LCD's.) LED-backlit LCD televisions have been developed to reduce this distinction.
LED-backlit LCDs have longer life and better energy efficiency than plasma and CCFL LCD TVs.

Alternate lighting of surfaces

Early high-definition (HD) plasma displays had a resolution of 1024x1024 and were alternate lighting of surfaces (ALiS) panels made by Fujitsu/Hitachi.
Alternate lighting of surfaces (ALiS) is type of plasma display technology jointly developed by Fujitsu and Hitachi in 1999.

Screen burn-in

burn-inphosphor burn-inscreen burn
Plasma displays also exhibit another image retention issue which is sometimes confused with screen burn-in damage.
With phosphor-based electronic displays (for example CRT-type computer monitors or plasma displays), non-uniform use of pixels, such as prolonged display of non-moving images (text or graphics), gaming, or certain broadcasts with tickers and flags, can create a permanent ghost-like image of these objects or otherwise degrade image quality.

Field-emission display

field emission displayFEDField emission display (FED)
Competing display technologies include cathode ray tube (CRT), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), AMLCD, Digital Light Processing DLP, SED-tv, LED display, field emission display (FED), and quantum dot display (QLED).
Non-linearity also means that the brightness of the sub-pixel is pulse-width modulated to control the number of electrons being produced, like in plasma displays.

Enhanced-definition television

enhanced definitionEDTVED
Although a few companies have been able to make plasma enhanced-definition televisions (EDTV) this small, even fewer have made 32 inch plasma HDTVs.
Unlike 1080i and SDTV formats, progressive displays (such as plasma displays and LCDs) can show EDTV signals without the need to de-interlace them first.

Glow discharge

Electric glow dischargeAston Dark SpaceDirect-current discharge
The collisions of the flowing electrons in the plasma with the inert gas atoms leads to light emission; such light-emitting plasmas are known as glow discharges.
Glow discharges are used as a source of light in devices such as neon lights, fluorescent lamps, and plasma-screen televisions.

Neon sign

neonneon signsneon signage
In a monochrome plasma panel, the gas is mostly neon, and the color is the characteristic orange of a neon-filled lamp (or sign).
In addition to signage, neon lighting is used frequently by artists and architects, and (in a modified form) in plasma display panels and televisions.

OLED

organic light-emitting diodeP-OLEDOLEDs
Competing display technologies include cathode ray tube (CRT), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), AMLCD, Digital Light Processing DLP, SED-tv, LED display, field emission display (FED), and quantum dot display (QLED). Since then, they have lost nearly all market share due to competition from low-cost LCDs and more expensive but high-contrast OLED flat-panel displays.
This is lower than the typical lifetime of LCD, LED or PDP technology; each currently is rated for about 25,000–40,000hours to half brightness, depending on manufacturer and model.

Phosphor

phosphorsP39 phosphorP7 phosphor
In color panels, the back of each cell is coated with a phosphor.

Liquid-crystal display

LCDliquid crystal displayLCD screen
Since then, they have lost nearly all market share due to competition from low-cost LCDs and more expensive but high-contrast OLED flat-panel displays.
LCD screens are available in a wider range of screen sizes than CRT and plasma displays, with LCD screens available in sizes ranging from tiny digital watches to very large television receivers.

Fujitsu

Fujitsu LimitedFujitsu ServicesFujitsu Laboratories
Early high-definition (HD) plasma displays had a resolution of 1024x1024 and were alternate lighting of surfaces (ALiS) panels made by Fujitsu/Hitachi.
In 1992, Fujitsu introduced the world's first 21-inch full-color plasma display.

Donald Bitzer

Donald L. BitzerDr. Donald Bitzer
The monochrome plasma video display was co-invented in 1964 at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign by Donald Bitzer, H. Gene Slottow, and graduate student Robert Willson for the PLATO computer system.
He was the co-inventor of the plasma display, is largely regarded as the "father of PLATO", and has made a career of improving classroom productivity by using computer and telecommunications technologies.

Gamut

color gamutwide color gamutWide color
Plasma displays are bright (1,000 lux or higher for the module), have a wide color gamut, and can be produced in fairly large sizes—up to 3.8 m diagonally.

Surface-conduction electron-emitter display

SEDSED-tvsurface electron display (SED)
Competing display technologies include cathode ray tube (CRT), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), AMLCD, Digital Light Processing DLP, SED-tv, LED display, field emission display (FED), and quantum dot display (QLED).
At the time there were a number of flat-screen technologies in early development, and the only one close to commercialization was the plasma display panel (PDP), which had numerous disadvantages – manufacturing cost and energy use among them.

1080p

Full HDFHD1080p30
Modern HDTV plasma televisions usually have a resolution of 1,024×768 found on many 42 inch plasma screens, 1280×768, 1,366×768 found on 50 in, 60 in, and 65 in plasma screens, or 1920×1080 found in plasma screen sizes from 42 inch to 103 inch.
1080p resolution is available in all types of television, including plasma, LCD, DLP front and rear projection and LCD projection.

H. Gene Slottow

The monochrome plasma video display was co-invented in 1964 at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign by Donald Bitzer, H. Gene Slottow, and graduate student Robert Willson for the PLATO computer system.
He was the co-inventor of the plasma display.

Owens-Illinois

Owens-Illinois Glass CompanyOwens IllinoisOwens-Illinois Glass Co.
The original neon orange monochrome Digivue display panels built by glass producer Owens-Illinois were very popular in the early 1970s because they were rugged and needed neither memory nor circuitry to refresh the images.
In 1971 Owens-Illinois produced an early commercial Plasma display, the digivue.

Flat-panel display

flat panel displayflat panelflat panel displays
A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display that uses small cells containing plasma; ionized gas that responds to electric fields.
The plasma display panel was invented in 1964 at the University of Illinois, according to The History of Plasma Display Panels.

Video scaler

upscaledupscalingStretch-o-Vision
As a result, picture quality varies depending on the performance of the video scaling processor and the upscaling and downscaling algorithms used by each display manufacturer.
The practice was imposed by the senior vice president of broadcast engineering at TNT, Clyde D. Smith, who argued that pillarboxing led to inconsistency between programs for viewers, could cause burn-in on plasma televisions, some older HDTVs could not stretch 4:3 content automatically, and the quality of stretching on some displays was poor.

Graphics display resolution

QVGAWVGAqHD
Early high-definition (HD) plasma displays had a resolution of 1024x1024 and were alternate lighting of surfaces (ALiS) panels made by Fujitsu/Hitachi. Modern HDTV plasma televisions usually have a resolution of 1,024×768 found on many 42 inch plasma screens, 1280×768, 1,366×768 found on 50 in, 60 in, and 65 in plasma screens, or 1920×1080 found in plasma screen sizes from 42 inch to 103 inch. Early plasma televisions were enhanced-definition (ED) with a native resolution of 840×480 (discontinued) or 853×480, and down-scaled their incoming High-definition video signals to match their native display resolution.
In 2006, was the most popular resolution for liquid crystal display televisions (versus XGA for Plasma TVs flat panel displays); by 2013, even this was relegated to only being used in smaller or cheaper displays (e.g. "bedroom" LCD TVs, or low-cost, large-format plasmas), cheaper laptop and mobile tablet computers, and midrange home cinema projectors, having otherwise been overtaken by higher "full HD" resolutions such as.

PLATO (computer system)

PLATOPLATO systemComputer-based Education Research Laboratory
The monochrome plasma video display was co-invented in 1964 at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign by Donald Bitzer, H. Gene Slottow, and graduate student Robert Willson for the PLATO computer system.
It included Bitzer's orange plasma display invention, which incorporated both memory and bitmapped graphics into one display.