Plinian eruption

PlinianeruptionSub-pliniansubplinianUltra PlinianUltraplinian eruptionVesuvianLetters of Pliny the Younger, Book Six, 16 and 20phreatoplinianPlinian column
Plinian eruptions or Vesuvian eruptions are volcanic eruptions marked by their similarity to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, which destroyed the ancient Roman cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii.wikipedia
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Types of volcanic eruptions

volcanic eruptioneruptionvolcanic eruptions
Plinian eruptions or Vesuvian eruptions are volcanic eruptions marked by their similarity to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, which destroyed the ancient Roman cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii.
The stronger eruptive types are Pelean eruptions, followed by Plinian eruptions; the strongest eruptions are called "Ultra-Plinian."

Eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79

eruption of Mount Vesuviuseruption of Vesuviuseruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79
Plinian eruptions or Vesuvian eruptions are volcanic eruptions marked by their similarity to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, which destroyed the ancient Roman cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii.
The event is the namesake for the Vesuvian type of volcanic eruptions.

Pompeii

PompeianPompeiancient Roman ruins
Plinian eruptions or Vesuvian eruptions are volcanic eruptions marked by their similarity to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, which destroyed the ancient Roman cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii.
Volcanologists have recognised the importance of Pliny the Younger's account of the eruption by calling similar events "Plinian".

Pumice

pumice stonepumiceouspumicite
The key characteristics are ejection of large amount of pumice and very powerful continuous gas-driven eruptions.
Pumice is a common product of explosive eruptions (plinian and ignimbrite-forming) and commonly forms zones in upper parts of silicic lavas.

Volcanic Explosivity Index

VEIvolcanic explosivity index (VEI)VEI 5
According to the Volcanic Explosivity Index, Plinian eruptions have a VEI of 4, 5 or 6, sub-Plinian 3 or 4, and ultra-Plinian 6, 7 or 8.

El Chichón

Chichonal volcano
The 1982 eruption of El Chichón in Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc, Chiapas, Mexico.
In little under a week, the presumed dormant volcano produced three plinian eruptions (March 29, April 3, and April 4).

Pliny the Younger

PlinyPliniusyounger Pliny
The eruption was described in a letter written by Pliny the Younger, after the death of his uncle Pliny the Elder.
The two letters have great historical value due to their accurate description of Vesuvius' eruption; Pliny's attention to detail in the letters about Vesuvius is so keen that modern volcanologists describe those types of eruptions as "Plinian eruptions".

Pliny the Elder

PlinyPlin.Plinius
The eruption was described in a letter written by Pliny the Younger, after the death of his uncle Pliny the Elder.
Plinian eruption

1883 eruption of Krakatoa

1883 eruptioneruption of KrakatoaKrakatoa
Plinian eruptions are often accompanied by loud noises, such as those generated by the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa. Eruptions in the ultra-Plinian category include the Lava Creek eruption of the Yellowstone Caldera (approx 640,000 years ago, VEI 8), Lake Toba (approx 74000 years ago, VEI 8), Tambora (1815, VEI 7), Krakatoa (1883, VEI 6), Akahoya eruption of Kikai Caldera, Japan, and the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines (VEI 6).

Bridge River Vent

400s BC eruption of the Bridge River Ventlarge explosive eruption
The 400s BC eruption of the Bridge River Vent in British Columbia, Canada.
Substantially, the Bridge River event was explosive in nature, ranging from Plinian to Peléan activity.

1886 eruption of Mount Tarawera

eruption of Mount Tarawera1886eruption in 1886
Basaltic, low-silicate lavas are unusual for Plinian eruptions; the most recent basaltic example is the 1886 eruption of Mount Tarawera on New Zealand's North Island.

Minoan eruption

Theravolcanic eruptioneruption of Thera
The 1645 BC eruption of Thera in the south Aegean Sea, Greece.
The eruption was of the Plinian type and it resulted in an estimated 30 to 35 km high ash plume which extended into the stratosphere.

Hatepe eruption

180 AD Lake Taupo eruption181 AD eruptionerupts
The 180 AD Lake Taupo eruption in New Zealand.
Despite the uniform composition of the erupted magma, a wide variety of eruptive styles were displayed, including weak phreatomagmatism, Plinian eruptions, and a huge pyroclastic flow.

Mount Tarumae

1667 and 1739 eruptions of Mount Tarumae
The 1667 and 1739 eruptions of Mount Tarumae in Hokkaido, Japan.
Previous major eruptions have occurred in 1667, 1739 (plinian eruption of VEI 5 ), and 1909.

1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

1980 eruptioneruption of Mount St. Helens1980 Mount St. Helens eruption
The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington in the United States.

Mount Pinatubo

Mt. Pinatubo1991 eruption of Mount PinatuboPinatubo
The 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in Zambales, Central Luzon, Philippines. Eruptions in the ultra-Plinian category include the Lava Creek eruption of the Yellowstone Caldera (approx 640,000 years ago, VEI 8), Lake Toba (approx 74000 years ago, VEI 8), Tambora (1815, VEI 7), Krakatoa (1883, VEI 6), Akahoya eruption of Kikai Caldera, Japan, and the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines (VEI 6).

Hōei eruption of Mount Fuji

1707 eruption of Mount Fuji1707-08 Hōei eruption of Mount Fujiearthquake of 1707
The 1707 eruption of Mount Fuji in Japan.

1815 eruption of Mount Tambora

1815 eruptionTambora1815
The 1815 eruption of Mount Tambora in the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia.

Peléan eruption

PeléanPelean domesPeléan phase
Peléan eruption, related to the explosive eruptions of the Mount Pelée
The tephra deposits have lower volume and range than the corresponding Plinian and Vulcanian eruptions.

Akahoya eruption

Eruptions in the ultra-Plinian category include the Lava Creek eruption of the Yellowstone Caldera (approx 640,000 years ago, VEI 8), Lake Toba (approx 74000 years ago, VEI 8), Tambora (1815, VEI 7), Krakatoa (1883, VEI 6), Akahoya eruption of Kikai Caldera, Japan, and the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines (VEI 6).

Volcano

volcanicvolcanoesextinct volcano
Plinian eruptions or Vesuvian eruptions are volcanic eruptions marked by their similarity to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, which destroyed the ancient Roman cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii.

Anno Domini

ADBCB.C.
Plinian eruptions or Vesuvian eruptions are volcanic eruptions marked by their similarity to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, which destroyed the ancient Roman cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii.

Herculaneum

ErcolanoExcavations of HercolaneumHerculaneum: Diaries of Darkness and Light
Plinian eruptions or Vesuvian eruptions are volcanic eruptions marked by their similarity to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, which destroyed the ancient Roman cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii.

Volcanic rock

volcaniclava rockvolcanic rocks
Plinian/Vesuvian eruptions are marked by columns of volcanic debris and hot gases ejected high into the stratosphere, the second layer of Earth's atmosphere.

Volcanic gas

gasgasesgaseous content
Plinian/Vesuvian eruptions are marked by columns of volcanic debris and hot gases ejected high into the stratosphere, the second layer of Earth's atmosphere.