Plot (narrative)

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In a literary work, film or other narrative or story, the plot is the sequence of events, where each event affects the next one through the principle of cause-and-effect.wikipedia
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Narrative

storystoriesnarratives
In a literary work, film or other narrative or story, the plot is the sequence of events, where each event affects the next one through the principle of cause-and-effect.

Scene (drama)

scenescenesFrench scenes
Teri Shaffer Yamada agrees that a plot does not include memorable scenes within a story which do not relate directly to other events but only "major events that move the action in a narrative."

Defamiliarization

Ostraneniedefamiliarisationdefamiliarize
Defamiliarization or “making strange,” a term Shklovsky coined and popularized, upends familiar ways of presenting a story, slows down the reader's perception, and makes the story appear unfamiliar.
The Russian formalists distinguished between the fabula or basic story stuff of a narrative and the syuzhet or the formation of the story stuff into a concrete plot.

Poetics (Aristotle)

PoeticsAristotle's PoeticsThe Poetics
The Greek philosopher Aristotle, writing in the fourth century BC in his classic book The Poetics, considered plot or mythos as the most important element of drama, even more important than character.

Narrative structure

linear narrativenarrativeinteractive narration
The narrative text structures are the plot and the setting.

Narrative thread

storylinesstorylineStory lines
Thus the narrative threads experienced by different but specific characters or sets of characters are those seen in the eyes of those characters that together form a plot element or subplot in the work of fiction.

Scene and sequel

Sequel
Scene and sequel are two types of written passages used by authors to advance the plot of a story.

Mythos (Aristotle)

mythosmythoi
335 BCE) for the plot of an Athenian tragedy.

Plot drift

Plot drift, or narrative drift, is a phenomenon in storytelling in which the plot of the story deviates from its apparent initial direction.

Three-act structure

three-actthird actmajor dramatic question
Later in the first act, a dynamic, on-screen incident occurs, known as the inciting incident, or catalyst, that confronts the main character (the protagonist), and whose attempts to deal with this incident lead to a second and more dramatic situation, known as the first plot point, which (a) signals the end of the first act, (b) ensures life will never be the same again for the protagonist and (c) raises a dramatic question that will be answered in the climax of the film.

Subplot

B storysub-plotB-Plot
In fiction, a subplot is a secondary strand of the plot that is a supporting side story for any story or the main plot.

Premise (narrative)

premisedramatic premisePremise (filmmaking)
The premise of a text such as a book, film, or screenplay is the initial state of affairs that drives the plot.

Theme (narrative)

themethemesthemed
Along with plot, character, setting, and style, theme is considered one of the components of fiction.

Causality

causalcause and effectcausation
In a literary work, film or other narrative or story, the plot is the sequence of events, where each event affects the next one through the principle of cause-and-effect.

Ballad

balladspower balladpop ballad
Plots can vary from simple structures—such as in a traditional ballad—to complex interwoven structures sometimes referred to as subplot or imbroglio.

Ansen Dibell

In the narrative sense, the term highlights important points which have consequences within the story, according to Ansen Dibell.

E. M. Forster

E.M. ForsterE M ForsterEdward Morgan Forster
English novelist E. M. Forster described plot as the cause-and-effect relationship between events in a story.

Titanic (1997 film)

TitanicTitanic 3D1997 film
For example, in the 1997 film Titanic, when Rose climbs on the railing at the front of the ship and spreads her hands as if she's flying, this scene is memorable but does not directly influence other events, so it may not be considered as part of the plot.

The Empire Strikes Back

Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes BackStar Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Backcarbonite
Another example of a memorable scene which is not part of the plot occurs in the 1980 film The Empire Strikes Back, when Han Solo is frozen in carbonite.

The Wizard of Oz (1939 film)

The Wizard of OzWizard of OzThe Jitterbug
Steve Alcorn, a fiction-writing coach, said the main plot elements of The Wizard of Oz could be summarized as follows:

Russian formalism

Russian FormalistRussian Formalistsformalism
The Russian formalist, Viktor Shklovsky, viewed the syuzhet as the fabula defamiliarized.

Viktor Shklovsky

ShklovskyVictor Shklovsky
The Russian formalist, Viktor Shklovsky, viewed the syuzhet as the fabula defamiliarized.

The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

Tristram ShandyShandeanTristam Shandy
Shklovsky cites Lawrence Sterne's Tristram Shandy as an example of a fabula that has been defamiliarized.