Plum cake

prune cake
Plum cake refers to a wide range of cakes made with either dried fruit (such as grapes, currants, raisins or prunes) or with fresh fruit.wikipedia
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Fruitcake

fruit cakefruitcakesBudín
Since the meaning of the word "plum" has changed over time, many items referred to as plum cakes and popular in England since at least the eighteenth century have now become known as fruitcake.
Fruitcake was historically referred to as plum cake in England since around 1700.

Cuisine of Menorca

Menorcan cuisine
Within this typical Mediterranean cuisine there are also the influences of various invading people, particularly the English, who brought plum cake, puddings, and punch.

Robert Raikes' House

Robert Raikes was a promoter of the Sunday school movement, he held Sunday school sessions in the houses garden and Roberts wife used to serve plum cake to the children.

Fig cake

Fig cake, along with similar cakes such as jam cake, prune cake and applesauce cake, are common in this region during the Christmas and holiday season.

Grape

grapeswine grapewhite grape
Plum cake refers to a wide range of cakes made with either dried fruit (such as grapes, currants, raisins or prunes) or with fresh fruit.

Zante currant

currantscurrantCorinthian raisins
Plum cake refers to a wide range of cakes made with either dried fruit (such as grapes, currants, raisins or prunes) or with fresh fruit.

Raisin

raisinssultanasdried grapes
Plum cake refers to a wide range of cakes made with either dried fruit (such as grapes, currants, raisins or prunes) or with fresh fruit.

Prune

prunesDried Plumprune juice
Plum cake refers to a wide range of cakes made with either dried fruit (such as grapes, currants, raisins or prunes) or with fresh fruit.

Plum

plumsplum treePrune
Plum cakes made with fresh plums came with other migrants from other traditions in which plum cake is prepared using plum as a primary ingredient. Since dried fruit is used as a sweetening agent and any dried fruit used to be described as "plums", many plum cakes and plum puddings do not contain the plum fruit now known by that name.

Fruit preserves

jamjellypreserves
In some versions, the plums may become jam-like inside the cake after cooking, or be prepared using plum jam.

Ashkenazi Jews

AshkenaziAshkenazi JewishJewish
Plum cake prepared with plums is also a part of Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine, and is referred to as Pflaumenkuchen or Zwetschgenkuchen.

Zwetschgenkuchen

Quetschenkuchen
Plum cake prepared with plums is also a part of Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine, and is referred to as Pflaumenkuchen or Zwetschgenkuchen.

Cake

cakesgateaugâteau
Since dried fruit is used as a sweetening agent and any dried fruit used to be described as "plums", many plum cakes and plum puddings do not contain the plum fruit now known by that name.

Pudding

puddingsBudyńbutterscotch pudding
Since dried fruit is used as a sweetening agent and any dried fruit used to be described as "plums", many plum cakes and plum puddings do not contain the plum fruit now known by that name.

Christmas pudding

plum puddingplum duffChristmas plum pudding
(Plum pudding is a similar, richer dish prepared with similar ingredients, cooked by steaming the mixture rather than baking it.) The term "plum" originally referred to prunes, raisins or grapes.

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
In Old English, the term plūme was "from medieval Latin pruna, from Latin prunum," which equated to "prune".

Levant

the LevantLevantineNear East
The various types of dried fruit (grapes, currants and raisins) were familiar to English kitchens through trade with The Levant and Mediterranean but before they became available through "trouble-free" imports from Australia, South Africa and California, preparing them required "an immense amount of labour ... on account of the rough and ready methods by which the fruit was picked, dried, packed and exported".

Thomas Carlyle

CarlyleCarlyle, ThomasCarlyles
At times, Thomas Carlyle was one among many who ate a light style of plum cake with tea, into which he would dip the cake, which he described as bun-like with currants "dotted here and there".

Bun

bunsList of bunshamburger buns
At times, Thomas Carlyle was one among many who ate a light style of plum cake with tea, into which he would dip the cake, which he described as bun-like with currants "dotted here and there".

Elizabeth David

Elizabeth David wrote that "Christmas mincemeat and Christmas plum pudding and cake are all such typical examples of the English fondness for spiced fruit mixtures that it seems almost unnecessary to include recipes for them ..."

Batter (cooking)

batterbatteredbatters
Plum cakes were raised by whipping air into the cake batter, rather than by the use of yeast.

Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management

Book of Household Managementcookery bookMrs Beeton
A range of plum cakes and puddings were published in the popular Book of Household Management (published 1859-1861) by Isabella Beeton.