Plural

A stylized version of the abbreviation for libra pondo ("pound weight")

One of the values of the grammatical category of number.

- Plural

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Grammatical number

Grammatical category of nouns, pronouns, adjectives and verb agreement that expresses count distinctions .

A stylized version of the abbreviation for libra pondo ("pound weight")

English and other languages present number categories of singular or plural, both of which are cited by using the hash sign (#) or by the numero signs "No."

Noun

Word that generally functions as the name of a specific object or set of objects, such as living creatures, places, actions, qualities, states of existence, or ideas.

Codex claromontanus latin (The S.S. Teacher's Edition-The Holy Bible - Plate XXVIII)

Count nouns or countable nouns are common nouns that can take a plural, can combine with numerals or counting quantifiers (e.g., one, two, several, every, most), and can take an indefinite article such as a or an (in languages which have such articles).

Grammatical person

Grammatical distinction between deictic references to participant in an event; typically the distinction is between the speaker (first person), the addressee (second person), and others (third person).

Person deixis, place deixis and time deixis in English

In Indo-European languages, first-, second-, and third-person pronouns are typically also marked for singular and plural forms, and sometimes dual form as well (grammatical number).

Dual (grammatical number)

A stylized version of the abbreviation for libra pondo ("pound weight")

Dual (abbreviated ) is a grammatical number that some languages use in addition to singular and plural.

Inflection

Process of word formation in which a word is modified to express different grammatical categories such as tense, case, voice, aspect, person, number, gender, mood, animacy, and definiteness.

Inflection of the Scottish Gaelic lexeme for "dog", which is cù for singular, chù for dual with the number dà ("two"), and coin for plural

Other types of irregular inflected form include irregular plural nouns, such as the English mice, children and women (see English plural) and the French yeux (the plural of œil, "eye"); and irregular comparative and superlative forms of adjectives or adverbs, such as the English better and best (which correspond to the positive form good or well).

Mass noun

Noun with the syntactic property that any quantity of it is treated as an undifferentiated unit, rather than as something with discrete elements.

Codex claromontanus latin (The S.S. Teacher's Edition-The Holy Bible - Plate XXVIII)

Mass nouns have no concept of singular and plural, although in English they take singular verb forms.

Singulative number

Unmarked form of a noun, and the noun is specially marked to indicate a single item.

A stylized version of the abbreviation for libra pondo ("pound weight")

This is the opposite of the more common singular–plural pattern, where a noun is unmarked when

Reduplication

Morphological process in which the root or stem of a word or even the whole word is repeated exactly or with a slight change.

Morpheme-based morphology tree of the word "independently"

Similarly to Standard Chinese, the meaning is not that of a true plural, but collectives that refer to a large, given set of the same object; for example, the formal English equivalent of 人々 would be "people" (collective), rather than "persons" (plural individuals).

English plurals

Inflection of the Scottish Gaelic lexeme for "dog", which is cù for singular, chù for dual with the number dà ("two"), and coin for plural

English nouns are inflected for grammatical number, meaning that, if they are of the countable type, they generally have different forms for singular and plural.

Plurale tantum

A stylized version of the abbreviation for libra pondo ("pound weight")

A plurale tantum (Latin for "plural only"; ) is a noun that appears only in the plural form and does not have a singular variant for referring to a single object.