Plural voting

plural votesfamily votingmore votesplural right to voteplural voteplural voterplural votersproperty-based number of votesvote multiple times
Plural voting is the practice whereby one person might be able to vote multiple times in an election.wikipedia
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University constituency

university constituenciesUniversity seatsuniversities
In the United Kingdom, up to 1948, people affiliated with a university were allowed a vote in both a university constituency and their home constituency, and property owners could vote both in the constituency where their property lay and that in which they lived, if the two were different.
These may or may not involve plural voting, in which voters are eligible to vote in or as part of this entity and their home area's geographical constituency.

Representation of the People Act 1948

Representation of the People ActRepresentation of the People Bill1948
These practices were finally abolished for parliamentary elections by the Representation of the People Act 1948, which first applied in the 1950 General Election.
It is noteworthy for abolishing plural voting, including by the abolition of the twelve separate university constituencies; and for again increasing the number of members overall, in this case to 613.

1950 United Kingdom general election

1950 general election19501950 election
These practices were finally abolished for parliamentary elections by the Representation of the People Act 1948, which first applied in the 1950 General Election.
Significant changes since the 1945 general election included the abolition of plural voting by the Representation of the People Act 1948, and a major reorganisation of constituencies by the House of Commons (Redistribution of Seats) Act 1949.

Sir Robert Fowler, 1st Baronet

Robert FowlerRobert Nicholas FowlerSir Robert Fowler, Bt
"I have myself five votes for five different constituencies—not that I have sought the votes by purchasing property for that purpose; but they have come to me accidentally on account of holding property in different places. Two are occupation votes, two freehold votes, and one is for a University. But I know many who have a great many more votes than five. I think it was Sir Robert Fowler, a late Member of this House, who used to boast that he had no fewer than thirteen votes in different constituencies, and that he was able at one General Election to record them all. Then there is the well-known case of the Oxford tutor—a man who had eighteen different qualifications, and, at the Election of 1874, voted in respect of these different qualifications eighteen times. But this case pales before one I heard of recently. A clergyman of the Church of England, who has a hobby for acquiring qualifications in different constituencies, has been able to obtain fifty votes in different places, and I was informed that at a certain General Election he contrived to vote in no fewer than forty different places."
George Shaw-Lefevre MP noted that, due to plural voting (whereby property owners could vote both in the constituency where their property lay and that in which they lived), Fowler had no fewer than thirteen votes in different constituencies.

Weighted voting

weightedweighted suffrageweighted votes
Weighted voting is a generalisation of plural voting.

Representation of the People Act 1918

Representation of the People Act1918Representation of the People Act, 1918
The Representation of the People Act 1918, Section 8(1), provided that "a man shall not vote at a general election ... for more than one constituency for which he is registered by virtue of other qualifications [than a residence qualification] of whatever kind, and a woman shall not vote at a general election ... for more than one constituency for which she is registered by virtue of any other qualification [than a local government qualification].".
Seven percent of the population enjoyed a plural vote in the 1918 election, mostly middle-class men who had an extra vote due to a university constituency (this Act increased the university vote by creating the Combined English Universities seats) or by occupying business premises in other constituencies.

University of Dublin (constituency)

Dublin UniversityUniversity of DublinU Dublin
Graduates of the University of Dublin and National University of Ireland are entitled to vote in these constituencies in addition to exercising their normal vote for Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas.
Plural voting by those who held a vote in both geographical and the university was allowed and prevalent.

National University of Ireland (constituency)

National University of IrelandNUINational University of Ireland constituency
Graduates of the University of Dublin and National University of Ireland are entitled to vote in these constituencies in addition to exercising their normal vote for Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas.
Most, if not all, of those electors would have been plural voters also entitled to vote in a territorial constituency.

Universal suffrage

universal adult suffrageuniversal franchiseuniversal male suffrage
In Belgium, plural voting was introduced in 1893 and applied for elections from 1894 to 1919 as a way to limit the impact of universal suffrage.

One man, one vote

one person, one voteone man one voteone person one vote
One man, one vote (or one person, one vote) is a slogan used by advocates of political equality through various electoral reforms such as universal suffrage, proportional representation, or the elimination of plural voting, malapportionment, or gerrymandering.

Election

electionselectedelectoral
Plural voting is the practice whereby one person might be able to vote multiple times in an election.

Plurality voting

majority votefirst past the postsingle-member
It is not to be confused with a plurality voting system which does not necessarily involve plural voting.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
In the United Kingdom, up to 1948, people affiliated with a university were allowed a vote in both a university constituency and their home constituency, and property owners could vote both in the constituency where their property lay and that in which they lived, if the two were different.

City of London

CityLondonthe City
However, plural voting for local government elections continued until it was abolished, outside the City of London, by the Representation of the People Act 1969.

Representation of the People Act 1969

1969Representation of the People Act
However, plural voting for local government elections continued until it was abolished, outside the City of London, by the Representation of the People Act 1969.

Queen's University of Belfast (Northern Ireland Parliament constituency)

Queen's University of BelfastQueen's UniversityQueen's University, Belfast
Until the Electoral Law Act 1968 took effect in 1969, the Queen's University, Belfast constituency was retained in the Parliament of Northern Ireland and owners of businesses were allowed to cast more than one vote in parliamentary elections.

Parliament of Northern Ireland

StormontStormont ParliamentNorthern Ireland Parliament
Until the Electoral Law Act 1968 took effect in 1969, the Queen's University, Belfast constituency was retained in the Parliament of Northern Ireland and owners of businesses were allowed to cast more than one vote in parliamentary elections.

Tim Pat Coogan

Coogan, Tim PatCoogan, TPThe Famine Plot
Tim Pat Coogan wrote on this subject:

Cadastre

cadastralcadastercadastral map
For municipal elections, a fourth vote was granted to family heads who paid a fixed level of electoral tax, or whose cadastral income was at least of 150 francs.

Government of the 6th Dáil

4th Executive Council4th4th Executive Council of the Irish Free State
The Local Government (Dublin) Act 1930, passed by the Cumann na nGaedheal government, provided that Dublin City Council would comprise 30 popularly elected "ordinary members" and five "commercial members" elected by business ratepayers (individuals or corporate persons).