Plurality-at-large voting

partial block votingbloc votebloc votingblock votingPlurality-at-largeat-largeblock votemultiple non-transferable voteat large" voting systemMulti-member plurality system
Plurality-at-large voting, also known as block vote or multiple non-transferable vote (MNTV), is a non-proportional voting system for electing several representatives from a single multimember electoral district using a series of check boxes and tallying votes similar to a plurality election.wikipedia
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Electoral system

multi-membervoting systemvoting systems
Plurality-at-large voting, also known as block vote or multiple non-transferable vote (MNTV), is a non-proportional voting system for electing several representatives from a single multimember electoral district using a series of check boxes and tallying votes similar to a plurality election.
In cases where there are multiple positions to be elected, most commonly in cases of multi-member constituencies, plurality voting is referred to as bloc voting or plurality-at-large.

At-large

at largeAt-Large DistrictsNationwide Constituency
The term "plurality at-large" is in common usage in elections for representative members of a body who are elected or appointed to represent the whole membership of the body (for example, a city, state or province, nation, club or association).
If a group of seats must be covered, many electoral systems can be possible, from proportional representation methods (such as party-list proportional representation, or PR-STV) to block voting.

Tactical voting

strategic votingvote tacticallystrategically
Plurality block voting, like single-winner plurality voting, is particularly vulnerable to tactical voting. Additionally, like first past the post methods, if there are many parties running and voters do not engage in tactical voting, a small cohesive group of voters, making up only a minority of the voters, can elect all the open seats by merely constituting a plurality.
Bullet voting is when a voter votes for just one candidate, despite having the option to vote for more than one due to a voting method such as approval voting, plurality-at-large voting, and Condorcet methods.

Limited voting

limitedlimited voteblock voting
Block voting as described in this article is "unlimited voting", unlike "limited voting", where a voter has fewer votes than the number of seats contested.
Although it frequently enables minority groupings to gain representation – unlike first past the post or bloc voting systems – it is not guaranteed to do this, since the effectiveness of a sectional vote may be altered depending on the number of candidates fielded.

Cumulative voting

Allocation votingmore than one representativemultiple-member districts
Each voter selects up to m candidates on the ballot (voters are sometimes said to have m votes; however, they are unable to vote for the same candidate more than once as is permitted in cumulative voting ).
This is different from bloc voting, where a voter may not vote more than once for any candidate, and 51% of voters can control 100% of representation.

Multi-member constituencies in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

Multi-member seatsconstituencymulti-member constituencies
Historically, similar situations arose within the multi-member constituencies in the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
The original method and the one most commonly used is the following variety of bloc vote:

General ticket

at-largescrutin de listeat-large basis
The party block voting, or general ticket, is the party-list version of the bloc vote.
General ticket representation is voting system, analogous to block voting, but where voters elect parties, not candidates.

Proportional representation

proportional representation systemproportionalproportional voting
Plurality-at-large voting, also known as block vote or multiple non-transferable vote (MNTV), is a non-proportional voting system for electing several representatives from a single multimember electoral district using a series of check boxes and tallying votes similar to a plurality election. Block voting is not a system for obtaining proportional representation; instead the usual result is that where the candidates divide into definitive parties (especially for example where those parties have party lines which are whipped) the most popular party in the district sees its full slate of candidates elected, resulting in a landslide.
Although Cincinnati's council-manager system survives, Republicans and other disaffected groups replaced STV with plurality-at-large voting in 1957.

Gibraltar Parliament

House of AssemblyParliamentGibraltar House of Assembly
Partial bloc voting is used for elections to the Gibraltar Parliament, where each voter has 10 votes and 17 seats are open for election; the usual result is that the most popular party wins 10 seats and forms the ruling administration, while the second most popular wins seven seats and forms the opposition.
The system lends itself to block voting – each of the parties or electoral coalitions tended to nominate a slate of ten candidates and encourage its supporters to vote for all of them.

Elections in Gibraltar

Gibraltar1976 electionGibraltar general election
Partial bloc voting is used for elections to the Gibraltar Parliament, where each voter has 10 votes and 17 seats are open for election; the usual result is that the most popular party wins 10 seats and forms the ruling administration, while the second most popular wins seven seats and forms the opposition.
Elections take place roughly every four years, 17 members (15 before 2007) are elected at each election, using partial bloc voting.

Slate (elections)

slateslateselection slate
Block voting is not a system for obtaining proportional representation; instead the usual result is that where the candidates divide into definitive parties (especially for example where those parties have party lines which are whipped) the most popular party in the district sees its full slate of candidates elected, resulting in a landslide.
The same is true for local legislatures, depending on how many seats are up, where elections are done via plurality-at-large voting.

Bullet voting

bullet votebullet-votedplumping
Bullet voting is a strategy in which a voter only votes for a single candidate in an attempt to stop them being beaten by additional choices.
* Plurality-at-large voting (Bloc-voting) allows up to N votes for elections with N winner elections.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
Historically, partial block voting was used in three- and four-member constituencies in the United Kingdom, where voters received two votes, until multimember constituencies were abolished.
Councillors are elected by the first-past-the-post system in single-member wards or by the multi-member plurality system in multi-member wards.

Australian Senate

SenateSenatorAustralian Senator
Block voting was used in the Australian Senate from 1901 to 1948 (from 1918, this was preferential block voting).
The original arrangement involved a first-past-the-post and block voting or "winner takes all" system, on a state-by-state basis.

Panachage

vote splitting
Among non-proportional systems, plurality-at-large voting, limited voting and cumulative voting can also allow individuals to distribute their votes between candidates from different parties.

Plurality voting

majority votefirst past the postsingle-member
Plurality-at-large voting, also known as block vote or multiple non-transferable vote (MNTV), is a non-proportional voting system for electing several representatives from a single multimember electoral district using a series of check boxes and tallying votes similar to a plurality election. Plurality block voting, like single-winner plurality voting, is particularly vulnerable to tactical voting.
In a system based on multi-member districts, it may be referred to as winner-takes-all or bloc voting.

1997 Toronto municipal election

19971997 municipal election1997 election
When Toronto was amalgamated in 1997, the new entity's first election used a similar rule.
The election followed a plurality-at-large voting system where electors could vote for two candidates.

Plurality (voting)

pluralityrelative majoritysimple majority
Additionally, like first past the post methods, if there are many parties running and voters do not engage in tactical voting, a small cohesive group of voters, making up only a minority of the voters, can elect all the open seats by merely constituting a plurality.

2006 Palestinian legislative election

2006 election2006 Palestinian electionsPalestinian legislative election
In some Lebanese and Palestinian constituencies, there is only one seat to be filled; in the Palestinian election of 1996 there were only plurality seats, but in 2006 half the seats were elected by plurality, half by proportional representation nationwide.
In June 2005 the PLC legislated to give effect to the Cairo Declaration, increasing its membership from 88 to 132, with half being elected by proportional representation and half by plurality-at-large voting in traditional constituencies.

Elections in Jersey

Jerseyelectedelections
It is also used in Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, the Cayman Islands (until 2013, FPTP since 2017), the Falkland Islands and Saint Helena.
In the October 2011 elections, four senatorial seats were contested, each voter having a maximum of four unranked votes in a first past the post bloc voting system (multi-member plurality system).

Senate of the Philippines

SenateSenatorPhilippine Senate
The members of the Senate and all local legislatures are elected via this method.
The Senate is composed of 24 senators who are elected at-large with the country as one district under plurality-at-large voting.

First-past-the-post voting

first past the postfirst-past-the-postFPTP
Additionally, like first past the post methods, if there are many parties running and voters do not engage in tactical voting, a small cohesive group of voters, making up only a minority of the voters, can elect all the open seats by merely constituting a plurality.

Federal Senate

SenatorSenateSenators
Elections are held under the first-past-the-post and block voting systems.

Palestinian Legislative Council

Legislative CouncilPalestinian ParliamentPLC
Plurality block voting is or was also used in the election of the Senate of Poland (until 2011), of the Parliament of Lebanon, the plurality seats in the Palestinian Legislative Council and for the National Assembly of Mauritius.
The PLC in June 2005 increased the number of PLC members from 88 to 132, with half being elected under a system of proportional representation and half by plurality-at-large voting in traditional constituencies.

Politics of the Falkland Islands

Falkland Islands GovernmentFalkland IslandsAdvisory Committee on the Prerogative of Mercy
It is also used in Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, the Cayman Islands (until 2013, FPTP since 2017), the Falkland Islands and Saint Helena.
General elections must take place at least once every four years, in which the islanders elect eight members to the Legislative Assembly (five from Stanley and three from Camp) through universal suffrage using block voting.