Pneumonia

bronchopneumoniabronchial pneumoniapneumonichypostatic pneumonianecrotizing pneumoniabroncho-pneumoniachronic pneumoniainflammation of the lungslung infectionspleural pneumonia
Pneumonia is an inflammatory condition of the lung affecting primarily the small air sacs known as alveoli.wikipedia
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Cystic fibrosis

CFCystic fibrosis of the pancreasdisease
Risk factors include other lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis, COPD, and asthma, diabetes, heart failure, a history of smoking, a poor ability to cough such as following a stroke, or a weak immune system. Exposure to birds is associated with Chlamydia psittaci; farm animals with Coxiella burnetti; aspiration of stomach contents with anaerobic organisms; and cystic fibrosis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.
Long-term issues include difficulty breathing and coughing up mucus as a result of frequent lung infections.

Stroke

strokesischemic strokecerebrovascular accident
Risk factors include other lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis, COPD, and asthma, diabetes, heart failure, a history of smoking, a poor ability to cough such as following a stroke, or a weak immune system.
Long-term complications may include pneumonia or loss of bladder control.

Lung

lungspulmonaryright lung
Pneumonia is an inflammatory condition of the lung affecting primarily the small air sacs known as alveoli.
The tissue of the lungs can be affected by a number of diseases, including pneumonia and lung cancer.

Inflammation

inflammatoryinflammatory responseinflamed
Pneumonia is an inflammatory condition of the lung affecting primarily the small air sacs known as alveoli. The term pneumonia is sometimes more broadly applied to any condition resulting in inflammation of the lungs (caused for example by autoimmune diseases, chemical burns or drug reactions); however, this inflammation is more accurately referred to as pneumonitis.
Acute inflammation of the lung (usually caused in response to pneumonia) does not cause pain unless the inflammation involves the parietal pleura, which does have pain-sensitive nerve endings.

Shortness of breath

dyspnearespiratory distressdyspnoea
Typically symptoms include some combination of productive or dry cough, chest pain, fever, and trouble breathing.
In 85% of cases it is due to asthma, pneumonia, cardiac ischemia, interstitial lung disease, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or psychogenic causes, such as panic disorder and anxiety.

Mycoplasma pneumoniae

pneumonia, mycoplasmaM. pneumoniaemycoplasma
Pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae may occur in association with swelling of the lymph nodes in the neck, joint pain, or a middle ear infection. Other commonly-isolated bacteria include Haemophilus influenzae in 20%, Chlamydophila pneumoniae in 13%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in 3% of cases; Staphylococcus aureus; Moraxella catarrhalis; Legionella pneumophila; and Gram-negative bacilli.
It is a human pathogen that causes the disease mycoplasma pneumonia, a form of atypical bacterial pneumonia related to cold agglutinin disease.

Sputum

expectorationmucuscoughing up mucus
Chest X-ray, blood tests, and culture of the sputum may help confirm the diagnosis.
The more intense the yellow color, the more likely it is a bacterial infection (bronchitis, bronchopneumonia, or pneumonia).

Hand washing

handwashinghand hygienewashing hands
Other methods of prevention include handwashing and not smoking.
Pneumonia, a major ARI, is the number one cause of mortality among children under five years old, taking the life of an estimated 1.8 million children per year.

Malnutrition

malnourishednutritional deficienciesmalnourishment
Fever is not very specific, as it occurs in many other common illnesses and may be absent in those with severe disease, malnutrition or in the elderly.
A lack of breastfeeding may contribute, as may a number of infectious diseases such as: gastroenteritis, pneumonia, malaria, and measles, which increase nutrient requirements.

Aspiration pneumonia

aspirationaspiration pneumonitisaspirated
Approximately 10% of people who require mechanical ventilation develop ventilator associated pneumonia, and people with gastric feeding tube have an increased risk of developing of aspiration pneumonia.
Aspiration pneumonia is a type of lung infection that is due to a relatively large amount of material from the stomach or mouth entering the lungs.

Community-acquired pneumonia

community acquired pneumoniacommunity-acquired bacterial pneumoniaCommunity-acquired
Bacteria are the most-common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), with Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in nearly 50% of cases.
Community-acquired pneumonia refers to pneumonia (any of several lung diseases) contracted by a person with little contact with the healthcare system.

Sepsis

septicemiasepticaemiablood poisoning
For people with specific variants of FER gene, the risk of death is reduced in sepsis caused by pneumonia.
There may also be symptoms related to a specific infection, such as a cough with pneumonia, or painful urination with a kidney infection.

Hemoptysis

coughing up bloodhaemoptysishæmoptysis
Bloody sputum (known as hemoptysis) may also occur with tuberculosis, Gram-negative pneumonia, lung abscesses and more commonly acute bronchitis.
This can occur with lung cancer, infections such as tuberculosis, bronchitis, or pneumonia, and certain cardiovascular conditions.

Chest pain

chestchest painschest tightness
Typically symptoms include some combination of productive or dry cough, chest pain, fever, and trouble breathing.
Pneumonia

Chlamydophila pneumoniae

C. pneumoniaeChlamydia pneumoniaeCh. pneumoniae
Other commonly-isolated bacteria include Haemophilus influenzae in 20%, Chlamydophila pneumoniae in 13%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in 3% of cases; Staphylococcus aureus; Moraxella catarrhalis; Legionella pneumophila; and Gram-negative bacilli.
Chlamydophila pneumoniae is a species of Chlamydophila, an obligate intracellular bacterium that infects humans and is a major cause of pneumonia.

Pneumonitis

inflammation of the lungslung inflammationgranuloma pneumonitis
The term pneumonia is sometimes more broadly applied to any condition resulting in inflammation of the lungs (caused for example by autoimmune diseases, chemical burns or drug reactions); however, this inflammation is more accurately referred to as pneumonitis.
It is distinguished from pneumonia on the basis of causation as well as its manifestation since pneumonia can be described as pneumonitis combined with consolidation and exudation of lung tissue due to infection with microorganism.

Cough

coughingdry coughproductive cough
Typically symptoms include some combination of productive or dry cough, chest pain, fever, and trouble breathing.
A cough can be the result of a respiratory tract infection such as the common cold, acute bronchitis, pneumonia, pertussis, or tuberculosis.

Acute bronchitis

bronchial infectionviral bronchial infection
Bloody sputum (known as hemoptysis) may also occur with tuberculosis, Gram-negative pneumonia, lung abscesses and more commonly acute bronchitis.
Other causes of similar symptoms include asthma, pneumonia, bronchiolitis, bronchiectasis, and COPD.

Pneumocystis pneumonia

Pneumocystis'' pneumoniapneumocystis carinii pneumoniaPCP
It is most often caused by Histoplasma capsulatum, blastomyces, Cryptococcus neoformans, Pneumocystis jiroveci (pneumocystis pneumonia, or PCP), and Coccidioides immitis.
Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is a form of pneumonia that is caused by the yeast-like fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii.

Cyanosis

cyanoticbluish skinBlue discoloration of the skin
More severe signs and symptoms in children may include blue-tinged skin, unwillingness to drink, convulsions, ongoing vomiting, extremes of temperature, or a decreased level of consciousness.
Pneumonia

Staphylococcus aureus

S. aureusstaph infectionmethicillin-sensitive ''Staphylococcus aureus
Other commonly-isolated bacteria include Haemophilus influenzae in 20%, Chlamydophila pneumoniae in 13%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in 3% of cases; Staphylococcus aureus; Moraxella catarrhalis; Legionella pneumophila; and Gram-negative bacilli.
S. aureus can cause a range of illnesses, from minor skin infections, such as pimples, impetigo, boils, cellulitis, folliculitis, carbuncles, scalded skin syndrome, and abscesses, to life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome, bacteremia, and sepsis.

Human parainfluenza viruses

parainfluenzaparainfluenza virushuman parainfluenza virus
Commonly-implicated agents include rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus, and parainfluenza.
In immunosuppressed people, parainfluenza virus infections can cause severe pneumonia, which can be fatal.

Chlamydia psittaci

C. psittaciChlamydophila psittaciCh. psittaci
Exposure to birds is associated with Chlamydia psittaci; farm animals with Coxiella burnetti; aspiration of stomach contents with anaerobic organisms; and cystic fibrosis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.
Psittacosis in birds and in humans often starts with flu-like symptoms and becomes a life-threatening pneumonia.

Haemophilus influenzae

H. influenzaeHaemophilus influenzae'' type Bhaemophilus influenzae type B
Other commonly-isolated bacteria include Haemophilus influenzae in 20%, Chlamydophila pneumoniae in 13%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in 3% of cases; Staphylococcus aureus; Moraxella catarrhalis; Legionella pneumophila; and Gram-negative bacilli.
In infants and young children, H. influenzae type b (Hib) causes bacteremia, pneumonia, epiglottitis and acute bacterial meningitis.

Klebsiella

Klebsiella aerogenesKlebsiella sp.Klebsiella spp.
Pneumonia caused by Klebsiella may have bloody sputum often described as "currant jelly".
Klebsiella organisms can lead to a wide range of disease states, notably pneumonia, urinary tract infections, septicemia, meningitis, diarrhea, and soft tissue infections.