Pocket watch

pocketwatchwatch fobfob watchwatch chainpocket watcheswatchpocketwatchesfob or Pocket watchhalf-hunter watch
A pocket watch (or pocketwatch) is a watch that is made to be carried in a pocket, as opposed to a wristwatch, which is strapped to the wrist.wikipedia
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Watch

wristwatchwatcheswristwatches
A pocket watch (or pocketwatch) is a watch that is made to be carried in a pocket, as opposed to a wristwatch, which is strapped to the wrist.
A pocket watch is designed for a person to carry in a pocket.

Trench watch

They were the most common type of watch from their development in the 16th century until wristwatches became popular after World War I during which a transitional design, trench watches, were used by the military.
It was a transitional design between pocket watches and wristwatches, incorporating features of both.

Waistcoat

vestwaistcoatsvests
Pocket watches generally have an attached chain to allow them to be secured to a waistcoat, lapel, or belt loop, and to prevent them from being dropped.
Before wristwatches became popular, gentlemen kept their pocket watches in the front waistcoat pocket, with the watch on a watch chain threaded through a buttonhole.

Cigar cutter watch fob

cigar cutter
Ostensibly practical gadgets such as a watch winding key, vesta case, or a cigar cutter also appeared on watch chains, although usually in an overly decorated style.
A cigar cutter watch fob is a decorative and utilitarian pendant that is attached to the opposite side of a chain as a pocket watch.

Pocket

pocketspatch pocketFob pocket
A pocket watch (or pocketwatch) is a watch that is made to be carried in a pocket, as opposed to a wristwatch, which is strapped to the wrist.
A watch pocket or fob pocket is a small pocket designed to hold a pocket watch, sometimes found in men's trousers and waistcoats and in traditional blue jeans.

Verge escapement

verge and foliotfoliotcrown wheel and verge escapement
Up to the 1720s, almost all watch movements were based on the verge escapement, which had been developed for large public clocks in the 14th century.
Verge escapements were used from the late 13th century until the mid 19th century in clocks and pocketwatches.

Nuremberg

NürnbergNuremberg, GermanyNüremberg
Peter Henlein, a master locksmith of Nuremberg, was regularly manufacturing pocket watches by 1524.
Pocket watches — Nuremberg eggs — were made here in the 16th century by Peter Henlein.

Movement (clockwork)

movementmovementswatch movement
Up to the 1720s, almost all watch movements were based on the verge escapement, which had been developed for large public clocks in the 14th century.
When buying a quality pocketwatch from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century, for example, the customer would select a movement and case individually.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
They were the most common type of watch from their development in the 16th century until wristwatches became popular after World War I during which a transitional design, trench watches, were used by the military.
The war contributed to the evolution of the wristwatch from women's jewellery to a practical everyday item, replacing the pocketwatch, which requires a free hand to operate.

Thomas Mudge (horologist)

Thomas MudgeMudgeThomas
Then, towards the end of the 18th century, the lever escapement (invented by Thomas Mudge in 1755) was put into limited production by a handful of makers including Josiah Emery (a Swiss based in London) and Abraham-Louis Breguet.
Thomas Mudge (1715 – 14 November 1794, London) was an English horologist who invented the lever escapement, the greatest single improvement ever applied to pocket watches.

Kipton, Ohio

Kipton
A famous train wreck on the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway in Kipton, Ohio on April 19, 1891 occurred because one of the engineers' watches had stopped for four minutes.
Kipton was the site of a famous train wreck on April 18, 1891, which was caused by railroad engineers' watches not being in sync; and led to the adoption of stringent quality-control standards for railroad chronometers in 1893.

Patek Philippe SA

Patek PhilippePatek Philippe & Co.Patek Phillipe
Invented by Adrien Philippe in 1842 and commercialized by Patek Philippe & Co. in the 1850s, the stem-wind, stem-set movement did away with the watch key which was a necessity for the operation of any pocket watch up to that point.
Along with his fellow Czech-born Polish partner Franciszek Czapek, Polish watchmaker Antoni Patek formed Patek, Czapek & Cie in Geneva on May 1, 1839 and started making pocket watches.

Patek Philippe Henry Graves Supercomplication

Henry Graves Supercomplicationthe most complicated watch ever made
The Patek Philippe Henry Graves Supercomplication is one of the most complicated mechanical pocket watches ever created.

Henry Pitkin

The first American pocket watches with machine made parts were manufactured by Henry Pitkin with his brother in the later 1830s.
Pitkin was the inventor of the American lever watch movement for pocket watches.

Reference 57260

The Vacheron Constantin Reference 57260
The Vacheron Constantin Reference 57260 is a single highly complicated mechanical pocket watch, featuring 57 complications.

Patek Philippe Calibre 89

Calibre 89
The Patek Philippe Calibre 89 is a commemorative pocket watch created in 1989, to celebrate the company's 150th anniversary.

List of most expensive watches sold at auction

most expensive watches ever sold at auctionmost expensive watch ever sold at auctionmost expensive watches ever sold at auctions
As of June 2019, the most expensive watch/pocket watch ever sold at auction is the Patek Philippe Henry Graves Supercomplication, fetching US$23.98 million (23,237,000 CHF) in Geneva on November 11, 2014.

Balance spring

hairspringisochronousbalance spring or "hair spring
Positional adjustments are attained by careful poising (ensuring even weight distribution) of the balance-hairspring system as well as careful control of the shape and polish on the balance pivots.
The addition of the balance spring to the balance wheel around 1657 by Robert Hooke and Christiaan Huygens greatly increased the accuracy of portable timepieces, transforming early pocketwatches from expensive novelties to useful timekeepers.

Jean-Antoine Lépine

Lépine
An open-faced, or Lépine, watch, is one in which the case lacks a metal cover to protect the crystal.
Around 1764/65, he devised a means of manufacturing a pocket watch that could be thinner, favouring the onward quest for further miniaturization.

Suit

menswearsuitsbusiness suit
For a few years in the late 1970s and 1980s three-piece suits for men returned to fashion, and this led to small resurgence in pocket watches, as some men actually used the vest pocket for its original purpose.
A pocket watch on a chain, one end of which is inserted through a middle buttonhole, is often worn with a waistcoat; otherwise, since World War I when they came to prominence of military necessity, men have worn wristwatches, which may be worn with any suit except the full evening dress (white tie).

Railroad chronometer

railroad chronometerschronometerRailroad watch
The railroad officials commissioned Webb C. Ball as their Chief Time Inspector, in order to establish precision standards and a reliable timepiece inspection system for Railroad chronometers.

Fusee (horology)

fuseefuseeschain and fusee
Many keywind watch movements make use of a fusee, to improve isochronism.
In pocketwatches, the verge escapement, which required a fusee, was gradually replaced by escapements which were less sensitive to changes in mainspring force: the cylinder and later the lever escapement.

Wrist

radiocarpal jointwrist jointwrists
A pocket watch (or pocketwatch) is a watch that is made to be carried in a pocket, as opposed to a wristwatch, which is strapped to the wrist.

Chain

chainslink chainsteel chain
Pocket watches generally have an attached chain to allow them to be secured to a waistcoat, lapel, or belt loop, and to prevent them from being dropped.

Lapel

lapelsshawl collarpeak lapel
Pocket watches generally have an attached chain to allow them to be secured to a waistcoat, lapel, or belt loop, and to prevent them from being dropped.