Pocomtuc

PocumtucPocumtuckPocumtuc IndiansPocumtuck ConfederacyPocumtucks
The Pocumtuc (v. Pocomtuck) or Deerfield Indians were a prominent Native American tribe originally inhabiting western areas of what is now Massachusetts, especially around the confluence of the Deerfield and Connecticut Rivers in today's Franklin County.wikipedia
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Connecticut River

Connecticut River ValleyConnecticutUpper Valley
Pocomtuck) or Deerfield Indians were a prominent Native American tribe originally inhabiting western areas of what is now Massachusetts, especially around the confluence of the Deerfield and Connecticut Rivers in today's Franklin County.
The agricultural Pocomtuc tribe lived in unfortified villages alongside the Connecticut River north of the Enfield Falls on the fertile stretch of hills and meadows surrounding Springfield, Massachusetts.

Massachusetts

MACommonwealth of MassachusettsMass.
Pocomtuck) or Deerfield Indians were a prominent Native American tribe originally inhabiting western areas of what is now Massachusetts, especially around the confluence of the Deerfield and Connecticut Rivers in today's Franklin County.
Massachusetts was originally inhabited by tribes of the Algonquian language family such as the Wampanoag, Narragansett, Nipmuc, Pocomtuc, Mahican, and Massachusett.

New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England region
Little is known about the Pocumtuck people, but it is believed they led a lifestyle similar to other tribes of New England.
Prominent tribes included the Abenakis, Mi'kmaq, Penobscot, Pequots, Mohegans, Narragansetts, Pocumtucks, and Wampanoag.

Deerfield, Massachusetts

DeerfieldDeerfield, MA Deerfield
Their principal village, also known as Pocumtuck, was in the vicinity of the present day village of Deerfield.
At the time of the English colonists' arrival, the Deerfield area was inhabited by the Algonquian-speaking Pocumtuck nation, who settled a major village by the same name.

Wampanoag

Wampanoag peopleWampanoagsWampanoag Tribe
All these tribes united against the English colonists with the Wampanoag Confederacy in King Philip's War.
Philip gradually gained the Nipmuck, Pocomtuc, and Narragansett as allies, and the beginning of the uprising was first planned for the spring of 1676.

Enfield, Connecticut

EnfieldEnfield, CTScitico
Enfield was originally inhabited by the Pocomtuc tribe, and contained their two villages of Scitico and Nameroke.

Agawam, Massachusetts

AgawamAgawam, MA[*
On May 15, 1636, William Pynchon purchased land on both sides of the Connecticut River from the local Pocomtuc Indians known as Agawam, which included present-day Springfield, Chicopee, Longmeadow, and West Springfield, Massachusetts.

Northampton, Massachusetts

NorthamptonNorthampton, MANorthampton, Mass
Northampton is also known as "Norwottuck", or "Nonotuck", meaning "the midst of the river", named by its original Pocumtuc inhabitants.

Westfield, Massachusetts

WestfieldWestfield, MAWestfield Athenaeum
The area was originally inhabited by the Pocomtuc tribe, and was called Woronoco (meaning "the winding land" ).

Mount Greylock

GreylockMt. GreylockStony Ledge
Mount Greylock in the Berkshires is named after him.
1670-1750) was a Western Abenaki Missisquoi chief of Woronoco-Pocomtuc ancestry, born near Westfield, Massachusetts.

Norwottuck

It is also used to refer to the Algonquian people who once lived there, who were part of the Pocumtuck Confederacy.

Russell, Massachusetts

RussellWoronocoRussell, MA
Russell was originally part of the Pocumtuc (also called Deerfield) nation, who spoke an Algonquian language.

Dunwich (Lovecraft)

Dunwich
The "Pocumtucks" are mentioned in the H. P. Lovecraft novella The Dunwich Horror as the presumed builders of the stone circles in the hills around Dunwich.
Dunwich is described as being surrounded by "great rings of rough-hewn stone columns on the hilltops", which are presumed to have been built by the Pocumtucks.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
Pocomtuck) or Deerfield Indians were a prominent Native American tribe originally inhabiting western areas of what is now Massachusetts, especially around the confluence of the Deerfield and Connecticut Rivers in today's Franklin County.

Deerfield River

DeerfieldSomerset Dam
Pocomtuck) or Deerfield Indians were a prominent Native American tribe originally inhabiting western areas of what is now Massachusetts, especially around the confluence of the Deerfield and Connecticut Rivers in today's Franklin County.

Franklin County, Massachusetts

Franklin CountyFranklinGreenfield Town, MA Micropolitan Statistical Area
Pocomtuck) or Deerfield Indians were a prominent Native American tribe originally inhabiting western areas of what is now Massachusetts, especially around the confluence of the Deerfield and Connecticut Rivers in today's Franklin County.

Hampden County, Massachusetts

Hampden CountyHampdencounty of Hampden
Their territory also included much of current-day Hampden and Hampshire Counties, plus areas now in northern Connecticut and southern Vermont.

Hampshire County, Massachusetts

Hampshire CountyHampshireHampshire Co.
Their territory also included much of current-day Hampden and Hampshire Counties, plus areas now in northern Connecticut and southern Vermont.

Connecticut

CTState of ConnecticutConn.
Their territory also included much of current-day Hampden and Hampshire Counties, plus areas now in northern Connecticut and southern Vermont.

Vermont

VTState of VermontGeography of Vermont
Their territory also included much of current-day Hampden and Hampshire Counties, plus areas now in northern Connecticut and southern Vermont.

Algonquian languages

AlgonquianAlgonquian languageAlgonquin
Their language, now extinct, was an R-dialect of the Algonquian language family, most likely related to the Wappinger and nearby Mahican tribes of the Hudson River Valley.

Wappinger

SintsinkKitchawankNochpeem
Their language, now extinct, was an R-dialect of the Algonquian language family, most likely related to the Wappinger and nearby Mahican tribes of the Hudson River Valley.

Mohicans

MahicanMohicanMohican Indians
Their language, now extinct, was an R-dialect of the Algonquian language family, most likely related to the Wappinger and nearby Mahican tribes of the Hudson River Valley.

Hudson Valley

Hudson River ValleyLower Hudson ValleyMid-Hudson Region
Their language, now extinct, was an R-dialect of the Algonquian language family, most likely related to the Wappinger and nearby Mahican tribes of the Hudson River Valley.