Polabian language

PolabianOld PolabianSlavicDraveno-PolabianOld Polabian languagePolabian dialectsPolabian-languagePolabspoxSlavic language
The Polabian language is an extinct West Slavic language that was spoken by the Polabian Slavs (Wenden) in present-day northeastern Germany around the Elbe (Łaba/Laba/Labe in Slavic) river, from which derives its name (po Labe - [traveling] on Elbe or [living] up to Elbe).wikipedia
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Polabian Slavs

SlavicPolabianWest Slavic
The Polabian language is an extinct West Slavic language that was spoken by the Polabian Slavs (Wenden) in present-day northeastern Germany around the Elbe (Łaba/Laba/Labe in Slavic) river, from which derives its name (po Labe - [traveling] on Elbe or [living] up to Elbe).
The Polabian language is now extinct.

West Slavic languages

West SlavicWest Slavic languageWest
The Polabian language is an extinct West Slavic language that was spoken by the Polabian Slavs (Wenden) in present-day northeastern Germany around the Elbe (Łaba/Laba/Labe in Slavic) river, from which derives its name (po Labe - [traveling] on Elbe or [living] up to Elbe).

Kashubian language

KashubianCashubiancsb.
It was close to Pomeranian and Kashubian, and is attested only in a handful of manuscripts, dictionaries and various writings from the 17th and 18th centuries.
It is close to standard Polish with influence from Low German and the extinct Polabian and Old Prussian.

Lüchow

Ljauchów (Lüchow)LuchowLüchow (Wendland)
The language left many traces to this day in toponymy; for example, Wustrow (way to the island or place on the island), Ljauchów (Lüchow), Łuków (Luckau), compare Luknow (Lucknow) in Āryāvarta, Sagard, Gartow, Krakow (resembling Kraków, Krakov…) etc. Polabian language is also a likely origin of the name Berlin, from the Polabian stem berl-/birl- (swamp).
In the Polabian language, Lüchow is called Ljauchüw (Lgauchi or Lieuschü in older German reference material).

Pomeranian language

PomeranianCentral PomeranianAncient Pomeranian
It was close to Pomeranian and Kashubian, and is attested only in a handful of manuscripts, dictionaries and various writings from the 17th and 18th centuries.
Their dialects, sometimes referred to as Ancient Pomeranian, had transitory character between the Polabian dialects spoken west of Pomerania, and the Old Polish dialects spoken to the Southeast.

Berlin

Berlin, GermanyState of BerlinGerman capital
The language left many traces to this day in toponymy; for example, Wustrow (way to the island or place on the island), Ljauchów (Lüchow), Łuków (Luckau), compare Luknow (Lucknow) in Āryāvarta, Sagard, Gartow, Krakow (resembling Kraków, Krakov…) etc. Polabian language is also a likely origin of the name Berlin, from the Polabian stem berl-/birl- (swamp).
The name Berlin has its roots in the language of West Slavic inhabitants of the area of today's Berlin, and may be related to the Old Polabian stem berl-/birl- ("swamp").

Lechitic languages

LechiticLekhiticLechici
By the 18th century Lechitic Polabian was in some respects markedly different from other Slavic languages, most notably in having a strong German influence.

Slavic languages

SlavicSlavonicSlavic language
By the 18th century Lechitic Polabian was in some respects markedly different from other Slavic languages, most notably in having a strong German influence.
Slavic tribes did push westwards into Germanic territory, but borrowing for the most part seems to have been from Germanic to Slavic rather than the other way: for instance, the now-extinct Polabian language was heavily influenced by German, far more than any living Slavic language today.

Wends

WendishWendWendland
The Polabian language was spoken in the central area of Lower Saxony and in Brandenburg until around the 17th or 18th century.

Polabians (tribe)

PolabiansPolabiaPolabian
The last remnants of the Polabians died out in the 17th century, as did the Polabian language.

Slavs

SlavicSlavSlavic peoples
Early forms of germanization were described by German monks: Helmold in the manuscript Chronicon Slavorum and Adam of Bremen in Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum. The Polabian language survived until the beginning of the 19th century in what is now the German state of Lower Saxony.

Extinct language

extinctdead languageextinct languages
The Polabian language is an extinct West Slavic language that was spoken by the Polabian Slavs (Wenden) in present-day northeastern Germany around the Elbe (Łaba/Laba/Labe in Slavic) river, from which derives its name (po Labe - [traveling] on Elbe or [living] up to Elbe).

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
The Polabian language is an extinct West Slavic language that was spoken by the Polabian Slavs (Wenden) in present-day northeastern Germany around the Elbe (Łaba/Laba/Labe in Slavic) river, from which derives its name (po Labe - [traveling] on Elbe or [living] up to Elbe).

Elbe

Elbe RiverRiver ElbeLabe
The Polabian language is an extinct West Slavic language that was spoken by the Polabian Slavs (Wenden) in present-day northeastern Germany around the Elbe (Łaba/Laba/Labe in Slavic) river, from which derives its name (po Labe - [traveling] on Elbe or [living] up to Elbe).

Prussia

PrussianPrussian statePrussian army
It was spoken approximately until the rise to power of Prussia in mid-18th century, when it was superseded by Low German.

Low German

Low SaxonPlattdeutschLow German language
It was spoken approximately until the rise to power of Prussia in mid-18th century, when it was superseded by Low German.

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
By the 18th century Lechitic Polabian was in some respects markedly different from other Slavic languages, most notably in having a strong German influence.

Wustrow, Lower Saxony

WustrowWustrow (Wendland)
The language left many traces to this day in toponymy; for example, Wustrow (way to the island or place on the island), Ljauchów (Lüchow), Łuków (Luckau), compare Luknow (Lucknow) in Āryāvarta, Sagard, Gartow, Krakow (resembling Kraków, Krakov…) etc. Polabian language is also a likely origin of the name Berlin, from the Polabian stem berl-/birl- (swamp).

Luckau (Wendland)

LuckauŁuków (Luckau)
The language left many traces to this day in toponymy; for example, Wustrow (way to the island or place on the island), Ljauchów (Lüchow), Łuków (Luckau), compare Luknow (Lucknow) in Āryāvarta, Sagard, Gartow, Krakow (resembling Kraków, Krakov…) etc. Polabian language is also a likely origin of the name Berlin, from the Polabian stem berl-/birl- (swamp).

Lucknow

Lucknow, IndiaLukhnowMohanlalganj
The language left many traces to this day in toponymy; for example, Wustrow (way to the island or place on the island), Ljauchów (Lüchow), Łuków (Luckau), compare Luknow (Lucknow) in Āryāvarta, Sagard, Gartow, Krakow (resembling Kraków, Krakov…) etc. Polabian language is also a likely origin of the name Berlin, from the Polabian stem berl-/birl- (swamp).

Āryāvarta

Aryavartaancient IndiaAryavart
The language left many traces to this day in toponymy; for example, Wustrow (way to the island or place on the island), Ljauchów (Lüchow), Łuków (Luckau), compare Luknow (Lucknow) in Āryāvarta, Sagard, Gartow, Krakow (resembling Kraków, Krakov…) etc. Polabian language is also a likely origin of the name Berlin, from the Polabian stem berl-/birl- (swamp).

Sagard

WostevitzPolkvitz
The language left many traces to this day in toponymy; for example, Wustrow (way to the island or place on the island), Ljauchów (Lüchow), Łuków (Luckau), compare Luknow (Lucknow) in Āryāvarta, Sagard, Gartow, Krakow (resembling Kraków, Krakov…) etc. Polabian language is also a likely origin of the name Berlin, from the Polabian stem berl-/birl- (swamp).

Gartow

Schloß Gartow
The language left many traces to this day in toponymy; for example, Wustrow (way to the island or place on the island), Ljauchów (Lüchow), Łuków (Luckau), compare Luknow (Lucknow) in Āryāvarta, Sagard, Gartow, Krakow (resembling Kraków, Krakov…) etc. Polabian language is also a likely origin of the name Berlin, from the Polabian stem berl-/birl- (swamp).

Krakow am See

KrakowKraków (Western Pomerania
The language left many traces to this day in toponymy; for example, Wustrow (way to the island or place on the island), Ljauchów (Lüchow), Łuków (Luckau), compare Luknow (Lucknow) in Āryāvarta, Sagard, Gartow, Krakow (resembling Kraków, Krakov…) etc. Polabian language is also a likely origin of the name Berlin, from the Polabian stem berl-/birl- (swamp).