Polish language

PolishplPolish-languagepol.pl.polPolish:polonisedPolish-speakingPoland
Polish (język polski, polszczyzna or simply polski, ) is a West Slavic language of the Lechitic group.wikipedia
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Poles

PolishPolePolish people
It is spoken primarily in Poland and serves as the native language of the Poles.
The Poles (Polacy, ; singular masculine: Polak, singular feminine: Polka), commonly referred to as the Polish people, are a nation and West Slavic ethnic group native to Poland in Central Europe who share a common ancestry, culture, history, and are native speakers of the Polish language.

West Slavic languages

West SlavicWest Slavic languageWest
Polish (język polski, polszczyzna or simply polski, ) is a West Slavic language of the Lechitic group.
They include Polish, Czech, Slovak, Silesian, Kashubian, Upper Sorbian and Lower Sorbian.

Polish diaspora

PoloniaPolishPolish community
In addition to being an official language of Poland, it is also used by Polish minorities in other countries.
The Polish diaspora is also known in Modern Polish as Polonia, which is the name for Poland in Latin and in many Romance languages.

Lechitic languages

LechiticLekhiticLechici
Polish (język polski, polszczyzna or simply polski, ) is a West Slavic language of the Lechitic group.
The Lechitic (or Lekhitic) languages are a language subgroup consisting of Polish and several other languages and dialects that originally were spoken in the area.

Polish alphabet

Polishaccented charactersdiacritic
Polish is written with the standardized Polish alphabet, which has nine additions to the letters of the basic Latin script .
The Polish alphabet is the script of the Polish language, the basis for the Polish system of orthography.

Slovak language

SlovakSlovakianSlovak-language
Among the major languages, it is most closely related to Slovak and Czech, but differs from other Slavic varieties in terms of pronunciation and general grammar.
Slovak or less frequently Slovakian, is a West Slavic language (together with Czech, Polish, and Sorbian).

Czech language

CzechcsCzech-language
Among the major languages, it is most closely related to Slovak and Czech, but differs from other Slavic varieties in terms of pronunciation and general grammar.
Czech is closely related to Slovak, to the point of mutual intelligibility to a very high degree, as well as Polish.

Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth

Polish-Lithuanian CommonwealthPolandPolish
Polish was a lingua franca from 1500–1700 in Central and small portions of Eastern Europe, because of the political, cultural, scientific and military influence of the former Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.
Polish and Latin were the two co-official languages.

Languages of the European Union

EU languagesofficial languages of the European UnionLanguages of the EU
There are over 50 million Polish-language speakers around the world and it is one of the official languages of the European Union.

Vilnius

VilnaWilnoVilnius, Lithuania
Polish is the most widely used minority language in Lithuania's Vilnius County (26% of the population, according to the 2001 census results, with Vilnius having been part of Poland from 1922 until 1939) and is found elsewhere in southeastern Lithuania.
A variety of languages were spoken: Polish, German, Yiddish, Ruthenian, Lithuanian, Russian, Old Church Slavonic, Latin, Hebrew, and Turkic languages; the city was compared to Babylon.

Polish Americans

PolishPolish-AmericanPolish American
In the United States, Polish Americans number more than 11 million but most of them cannot speak Polish fluently.
In 2000, 667,414 Americans over 5 years old reported Polish as the language spoken at home, which is about 1.4% of the census groups who speak a language other than English or 0.25% of the U.S. population.

Belarus

BLRRepublic of BelarusBelorussia
It is also spoken as a second language in Northern Czech Republic and Slovakia, western parts of Belarus and Ukraine as well as in Central-Western Lithuania and Latvia.
In culture and social life, both the Polish language and Catholicism became dominant, and in 1696, Polish replaced Ruthenian as the official language—with the Ruthenian language being banned from administrative use.

Dialect continuum

dialect clusterdialect chaincontinuum
Polish, along with Czech and Slovak, forms the West Slavic dialect continuum.
Examples include the boundaries between Dutch and German, between Czech, Slovak and Polish, and between Belarusian and Ukrainian.

Wales

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿WelshWAL
According to the 2011 census there are now over 500,000 people in England and Wales who consider Polish to be their "main" language.
The modern names for various Romance-speaking people in Continental Europe (e.g. Wallonia, Wallachia, Valais, Vlachs, and Włochy, the Polish name for Italy) have a similar etymology.

Ukrainian language

UkrainianUkrainian-languagemodern Ukrainian language
Although not closely related to it, Polish shares many linguistic affinities with Ukrainian, an East Slavic language with which it has been in prolonged historical contact and in a state of mutual influence.
By the 16th century, a peculiar official language was formed: a mixture of the liturgical standardised language of Old Church Slavonic, Ruthenian and Polish, with the influence of the last of these three gradually increasing, considering that the nobility and rural large-landowning class, known as the szlactha, was largely Polish-speaking.

Brest, Belarus

BrestBrest-LitovskBrześć
In Ukraine, it is most common in western Lviv and Volyn Oblasts, while in West Belarus it is used by the significant Polish minority, especially in the Brest and Grodno regions and in areas along the Lithuanian border.
In the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth formed in 1569 the town became known in Polish as Brześć, historically Brześć Litewski (literally: "Lithuanian Brest", in contradistinction to Brześć Kujawski).

Kashubian language

KashubianCashubiancsb.
Kashubian, spoken in Pomerania west of Gdańsk on the Baltic Sea, is thought of either as a fifth Polish dialect or a distinct language, depending on the criteria used.
Kashubian or Cassubian (Kashubian: kaszëbsczi jãzëk, pòmòrsczi jãzëk, kaszëbskò-słowińskô mòwa; język kaszubski, język pomorski, język kaszubsko-słowiński) is a West Slavic lect belonging to the Lechitic subgroup along with Polish and Silesian.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
It is spoken primarily in Poland and serves as the native language of the Poles.
Polish (język polski) belongs to the Lechitic subgroup of West Slavic languages, with close relations to Czech language and Slovak.

Dialects of Polish

Dialects of the Polish languageSoutheastern Cuyavian dialectsPolish population
Kashubian, spoken in Pomerania west of Gdańsk on the Baltic Sea, is thought of either as a fifth Polish dialect or a distinct language, depending on the criteria used.
Modern sources on Slavic languages normally describe the Polish language as consisting of four major dialect groups, each primarily associated with a particular geographical region, and often further subdivided into subdialectal groups (termed gwara in Polish).

Pomerania

PomorzePommernPomeranian
Kashubian, spoken in Pomerania west of Gdańsk on the Baltic Sea, is thought of either as a fifth Polish dialect or a distinct language, depending on the criteria used.
The name derives from the Polish term po morze, meaning "by the sea" or "on the sea".

Lesser Poland

MałopolskaLesser PolishEast Małopolska
Lesser Poland, often known by its Polish name Małopolska (Polonia Minor), is a historical region of Poland; its capital is the city of Kraków.

Warsaw dialect

dialect of pre-war Warsaw
The Warsaw dialect (called gwara warszawska in standard Polish, pronounced ), or Masovian, is a regional dialect of the Polish language centered on Warsaw.

Vlachs

VlachWallachianWallach
In Czech, Polish and Hungarian, derivations of the term were also applied to Italians.

Baltic Sea

BalticBaltic coastthe Baltic
Kashubian, spoken in Pomerania west of Gdańsk on the Baltic Sea, is thought of either as a fifth Polish dialect or a distinct language, depending on the criteria used.

Poznań

PosenPoznanPoznan, Poland
The name Poznań probably comes from a personal name, Poznan (from the Polish participle poznan(y) – "one who is known/recognized"), and would mean "Poznan's town".