Polish resistance movement in World War II

Polish resistancePolish resistance movementPolish undergroundresistance movementunderground resistancePolish resistance in World War IIresistancePolishanti-Nazi resistancePolish anti-Nazi resistance
The Polish resistance movement in World War II, with the Polish Home Army at its forefront, was the largest underground resistance movement in all of occupied Europe, covering both German and Soviet zones of occupation.wikipedia
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Resistance during World War II

resistanceundergroundresistance movement
The Polish resistance movement in World War II, with the Polish Home Army at its forefront, was the largest underground resistance movement in all of occupied Europe, covering both German and Soviet zones of occupation.
Among the most notable resistance movements were the Polish Resistance, including the Polish Home Army, Leśni, and the whole Polish Underground State; Yugoslav Partisans, the Soviet partisans, the Italian Resistenza led mainly by the Italian CLN; the French Resistance, the Belgian Resistance, the Norwegian Resistance, the Danish Resistance, the Greek Resistance, the Czech resistance, the Albanian resistance, the Dutch Resistance especially the "LO" (national hiding organisation) and the politically persecuted opposition in Germany itself (there were 16 main resistance groups and at least 27 failed attempts to assassinate Hitler with many more planned): in short, across German-occupied Europe.

National Military Organization

Narodowa Organizacja WojskowaNOW
Narodowa Organizacja Wojskowa (National Military Organization, NOW) was one of the Polish resistance movements in World War II.

Bataliony Chłopskie

Peasants' BattalionsBataliony ChlopskieBCh
The strength of the second largest resistance organization, Bataliony Chłopskie (Peasants' Battalions), can be estimated for summer 1944 (at which time they were mostly merged with AK ) at about 160,000 men. The Zamość Uprising was an armed uprising of Armia Krajowa and Bataliony Chłopskie against the forced expulsion of Poles from the Zamość region under the Nazi Generalplan Ost.
Bataliony Chłopskie (BCh, Polish Farmers' Battalions) was a Polish World War II resistance movement, guerrilla and partisan organisation.

Eastern Front (World War II)

Eastern FrontGreat Patriotic WarGerman-Soviet War
The Polish resistance is most notable for disrupting German supply lines to the Eastern Front, providing military intelligence to the British, and for saving more Jewish lives in the Holocaust than any other Western Allied organization or government.
The Soviet Union offered support to the partisans in many Wehrmacht-occupied countries in Central Europe, notably those in Slovakia, Poland and Yugoslavia.

Operation Tempest

Burzanationwide uprisingall-national uprising
In the summer of 1944 when Operation Tempest began, AK reached its highest membership numbers, though the estimates vary from 300,000 to 500,000.
Operation Tempest (akcja „Burza”, sometimes referred in English as Operation Storm) was a series of anti-Nazi uprisings conducted during World War II by the Polish Home Army (Armia Krajowa, AK), the dominant force in the Polish resistance.

National Armed Forces

Narodowe Siły ZbrojneNSZNarodowe Sily Zbrojne
The largest groups that refused to join the AK were the National Armed Forces and the pro-Soviet and communist People's Army (Polish Armia Ludowa or AL), backed by the Soviet Union and established by the Polish Workers' Party (Polish Polska Partia Robotnicza or PPR).
Narodowe Siły Zbrojne (NSZ; English: National Armed Forces) was a Polish anti-Nazi and later anti-Soviet military organization which was part of Poland's World War II resistance movement.

Konfederacja Narodu

Confederation of the NationKN
Konfederacja Narodu (Confederation of the Nation) was one of the Polish resistance organizations in occupied Poland during World War II.

Gwardia Ludowa WRN

Gwardia LudowaPolish Socialist Party,WRN
Gwardia Ludowa WRN (GL WRN, People's Guard of WRN) was a part of the Polish resistance movement in World War II.

Związek Organizacji Wojskowej

ZOWPolish resistanceUnion of Military Organizations
In the camp he organized the underground organization -Związek Organizacji Wojskowej - ZOW.
Związek Organizacji Wojskowej (, Military Organization Union), abbreviated ZOW, was an underground resistance organization formed by Witold Pilecki at Auschwitz concentration camp in 1940.

Polish Socialist Party

PPSSocialist Partysocialist
He met with Polish politicians in exile including the prime minister, and members of political parties such as the Socialist Party, National Party, Labor Party, People's Party, Jewish Bund and Poalei Zion.
The party supported the Polish resistance during World War II as the underground Polish Socialist Party – Freedom, Equality, Independence (Polska Partia Socjalistyczna – Wolność, Równość, Niepodległość).

Armia Ludowa

People's ArmyPolish People's ArmyAL
The largest groups that refused to join the AK were the National Armed Forces and the pro-Soviet and communist People's Army (Polish Armia Ludowa or AL), backed by the Soviet Union and established by the Polish Workers' Party (Polish Polska Partia Robotnicza or PPR).
Due to their close affiliation with the Soviet Union, which de facto controlled Armia Ludowa and its predecessors, Armia Ludowa can be seen as both a part of the Polish resistance as well as the Soviet partisan movement.

Igo Sym

Karol Juliusz "Igo" Sym
On 7 March 1941, two Polish agents of the Home Army killed Nazi collaborator actor Igo Sym in his apartment in Warsaw.
He was killed in Warsaw by members of the Polish resistance movement.

Operation N

Action NAction "NAkcja N
From April 1941 the Bureau of Information and Propaganda of the Union for Armed Struggle started Operation N headed by Tadeusz Żenczykowski.
Operation N (Akcja N, where "N" stands for the Polish word "Niemcy," "Germany") was a complex of sabotage, subversion and black-propaganda activities carried out by the Polish resistance against Nazi German occupation forces during World War II, from April 1941 to April 1944.

People's Party (Poland)

People's PartyStronnictwo LudoweSL
He met with Polish politicians in exile including the prime minister, and members of political parties such as the Socialist Party, National Party, Labor Party, People's Party, Jewish Bund and Poalei Zion.
During the Second World War it was known as 'Stronnictwo Ludowe Roch' and its military arm, Bataliony Chłopskie, formed part of the Polish resistance movement in World War II.

Jan Karski

#Jan Kozielewski (Karski)Jan Karski AwardKarski
In 1942 Jan Karski reported to the Polish, British and U.S. governments on the situation in Poland, especially the Holocaust of the Jews.
Jan Karski (24 June 1914 – 13 July 2000) was a Polish resistance-fighter soldier, and later a professor at Georgetown University.

Irena Sendler

Irena SendlerowaSendler, Irena
The best-known activist of Żegota was Irena Sendler, head of the children's division, who saved 2,500 Jewish children by smuggling them out of the Warsaw Ghetto, providing them with false documents, and sheltering them in individual and group children's homes outside the Ghetto.
Irena Stanisława Sendler, also referred to as Irena Sendlerowa in Poland, nom de guerre "Jolanta" (15 February 1910 – 12 May 2008), was a Polish social worker, humanitarian and nurse who served in the Polish Underground during World War II in German-occupied Warsaw, and from October 1943 was head of the children's section of Żegota, the Polish Council to Aid Jews (Rada Pomocy Żydom).

Zamość uprising

Zamosc UprisingZamojszczyzna 30 XII 1942-5 II 1943Zamość Rising
The Zamość Uprising was an armed uprising of Armia Krajowa and Bataliony Chłopskie against the forced expulsion of Poles from the Zamość region under the Nazi Generalplan Ost.
The Zamość uprising comprised World War II partisan operations, 1942–1944, by the Polish resistance (primarily the Home Army and Peasant Battalions) against Germany's Generalplan-Ost forced expulsion of Poles from the Zamość region (Zamojszczyzna) and the region's colonization by German settlers.

German-occupied Europe

Occupied EuropeGerman occupationNazi-occupied Europe
The Polish resistance movement in World War II, with the Polish Home Army at its forefront, was the largest underground resistance movement in all of occupied Europe, covering both German and Soviet zones of occupation.

Polish Underground State

Polish undergroundPolish Secret StatePolish resistance
It was a part of the Polish Underground State. On 26 March 1943 in Warsaw Operation Arsenal was launched by the Szare Szeregi (Gray Ranks) Polish Underground The successful operation led to the release of arrested troop leader Jan Bytnar "Rudy".
The Polish Underground State (Polskie Państwo Podziemne, also known as the Polish Secret State) is a collective term for the underground resistance organizations in Poland during World War II, both military and civilian, that were loyal to the Government of the Republic of Poland in exile in London.

National Radical Camp

National Radical Camp FalangaONRNational Radical Camp (1934)
As a Polish nationalist movement the RNR-Falanga opposed the German occupation of Poland after the 1939 invasion, and thus was quickly subsumed by the Konfederacja Narodu, a group within the Polish resistance that retained certain far right views.

Operation Arsenal

Arsenal actionAkcja pod Arsenałem
On 26 March 1943 in Warsaw Operation Arsenal was launched by the Szare Szeregi (Gray Ranks) Polish Underground The successful operation led to the release of arrested troop leader Jan Bytnar "Rudy".
The Operation Arsenal, code name: "Meksyk II" (Akcja pod Arsenałem) was the first major operation by the Szare Szeregi (Gray Ranks) Polish Underground formation during the Nazi occupation of Poland.

Henryk Iwański

Henryk Iwanski
One Polish AK unit, the National Security Corps (Państwowy Korpus Bezpieczeństwa), under the command of Henryk Iwański ("Bystry"), fought inside the ghetto along with ŻZW.
Henryk Iwański (1902-1978), nom de guerre Bystry, was a member of the Polish resistance during World War II.

Operation Heads

Operacja Główkicampaign of assassinationsGłówki
Operation Heads began: the serial executions of German personnel who had been sentenced to death by Polish underground Special Courts for crimes against Polish citizens in German-occupied Poland.
Operation Heads (Operacja Główki) was the code name for a series of assassinations of Nazi officials by the World War II Polish Resistance.

Operation Bürkl

Franz BürklBürklshot dead
On 7 September 1943, the Home Army killed Franz Bürkl during Operation Bürkl.
Operation Bürkl (operacja Bürkl), or the special combat action Bürkl (specjalna akcja bojowa Bürkl), was an operation by the Polish resistance conducted on September 7, 1943.

Battle of Murowana Oszmianka

battle oforganized a concentrated assaultpre–emptive Polish surprise attack
13 – 14 May 1944 the Battle of Murowana Oszmianka the largest clash between the Polish anti-Nazi Armia Krajowa and the Nazi Lithuanian Territorial Defense Force a Lithuanian volunteer security force subordinated to Nazi Germany.
The Battle of Murowana Oszmianka of May 13–May 14, 1944 was the largest clash between the Polish resistance movement organization Home Army (Armia Krajowa, AK) and the Lithuanian Territorial Defense Force (LTDF); a Lithuanian volunteer security force subordinated to Nazi Germany occupational administration.