Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives
Northeastern Virginia (1862)
Second Bull Run Campaign, August 17–30, 1862 (Additional map).
Battlefield of Manassas (right side)
Action at Brawner's Farm, August 28
August 29, 10 a.m.: Sigel's attack
August 29, 12 noon: Longstreet arrives, Porter stalls
August 29, 3 p.m.: Grover's attack
August 29, 5–7 p.m., Kearny's attack, Hood vs. Hatch
Stonewall Jackson's cannons on Henry House Hill
August 30, 3 p.m., Porter's attack
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
August 30, 4:30 p.m.: Union defense of Chinn Ridge
August 30, 5 p.m.: Final Confederate attacks, beginning of the Union retreat
Bridge crossed by the Union troops retreating to Centreville
Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862
Union troops retreat after the battle
<center>Maj. Gen.
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<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Gen.
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<center>Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862</center>
<center>Virginia, Bull Run. Ruins of Stone Bridge, 1862</center>
<center>A group of men stand near the Manassas Railroad Junction railroad tracks in 1862 with a train in the background</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>Men sit near the Manassas Junction railroad in 1862</center>
<center>Picking up debris of trains after Pope's retreat</center>
<center>Bull Run, Va. Dedication of the battle monument; Judge Abram B. Olin of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, who delivered the address, stands by the rail.</center>
Battle map drafted by Sneden, Robert Knox, with notes on Union and Confederate strengths, casualties, done in pen and ink and water color
Northern Virginia Campaign, August 7–28, 1862 Confederate
Union

Nathaniel Prentice Banks, former Governor of Massachusetts, held numerous commands during the war. He commanded the original V Corps (later XII Corps) at First Winchester, and also fought without distinction at Cedar Mountain and Second Bull Run as part of the Army of Virginia. He was transferred to the Department of the Gulf, and took part in the capture of Port Hudson, as well as the Red River Campaign. After that disastrous campaign, he was relieved of command.

- Political general

They were widely considered one of the army's weak links; with Sigel, though being a trained and experienced military officer, being seen as an inept political general.

- Second Battle of Bull Run
Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives

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Portrait by Brady-Handy studio, c. 1865–1880

Nathaniel P. Banks

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American politician from Massachusetts and a Union general during the Civil War.

American politician from Massachusetts and a Union general during the Civil War.

Portrait by Brady-Handy studio, c. 1865–1880
Portrait by Brady-Handy studio, c. 1865–1880
Major General Nathaniel Prentiss Banks of General Staff U.S. Volunteers Infantry Regiment in uniform, with his wife, Mary Theodosia Palmer Banks. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
Banks in 1852, portrait by Southworth and Hawes
John Albion Andrew (portrait by Darius Cobb) succeeded Banks as governor.
The champions of the Union, lithograph by Currier & Ives, 1861. Banks is among the frontmost standing figures, just left of the central seated figure, General Winfield Scott.
Banks' headquarters in Winchester, Virginia, during the Civil War
Banks in his military uniform, c. 1861 (portrait by Mathew Brady)
Colonel Short's Villa in New Orleans Garden District was the residence of Major General Nathaniel P. Banks, U.S. Commander, Department of the Gulf
1860s map showing the Siege of Port Hudson
Confederate General Richard Taylor opposed Banks in Louisiana.
General Edward Canby succeeded Banks in Louisiana.
Statue of Banks by Henry Hudson Kitson in Waltham, Massachusetts

At the outbreak of the Civil War, President Lincoln appointed Banks as one of the first 'political' major generals, over the heads of West Point regulars, who initially resented him, but came to acknowledge his influence on the administration of the war.

During the Second Battle of Bull Run, Banks was stationed with his corps at Bristoe Station and did not participate in the battle.