Political parties in the United States

political partiespolitical partypolitical party in the United StatespartyAmerican political partypartiesAmerican political partiesMajor partiesMulti-partisannational party
Political parties in the United States are dominated by two major parties.wikipedia
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Libertarian Party (United States)

LibertarianLibertarian PartyL
The largest third party since the 1980s has been the Libertarian Party.
The Libertarian Party (LP) is a political party in the United States that promotes civil liberties, non-interventionism, laissez-faire capitalism, and limiting the size and scope of government.

Green Party of the United States

Green PartyGreenGreens
Besides the Constitution, Green, and Libertarian parties, there are many other political parties that receive only minimal support and only appear on the ballot in one or a few states.
The Green Party of the United States (GPUS) is a federation of Green state political parties in the United States.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
The first two-party system consisted of the Federalist Party, who supported the ratification of the Constitution, and the Democratic-Republican Party or the Anti-Administration party (Anti-Federalists), who opposed the powerful central government, among others, that the Constitution established when it took effect in 1789.
The Democratic-Republican Party (known at the time as the Republican Party and various other names) was an American political party founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the early 1790s that championed republicanism, political equality, and expansionism.

Federalist Party

FederalistFederalistsF
The first two-party system consisted of the Federalist Party, who supported the ratification of the Constitution, and the Democratic-Republican Party or the Anti-Administration party (Anti-Federalists), who opposed the powerful central government, among others, that the Constitution established when it took effect in 1789.
The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration party until the 3rd United States Congress as opposed to their opponents in the Anti-Administration party, was the first American political party.

Whig Party (United States)

WhigWhig PartyWhigs
Two major parties dominated the political landscape: the Whig Party, led by Henry Clay, that grew from the National Republican Party; and the Democratic Party, led by Andrew Jackson.
Alongside the Democratic Party, it was one of the two major parties in the United States during the late 1830s, the 1840s, and the early 1850s, part of the period some scholars describe as the Second Party System.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
Two major parties dominated the political landscape: the Whig Party, led by Henry Clay, that grew from the National Republican Party; and the Democratic Party, led by Andrew Jackson.
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its main rival, the Republican Party.

National Republican Party

Anti-JacksonianNational RepublicanNational Republicans
Two major parties dominated the political landscape: the Whig Party, led by Henry Clay, that grew from the National Republican Party; and the Democratic Party, led by Andrew Jackson.
The National Republican Party, also known as the Anti-Jacksonian Party, was a political party in the United States that evolved from faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that supported John Quincy Adams in the 1824 presidential election.

Republican Party (United States)

RepublicanRepublican PartyR
The Third Party System stretched from 1854 to the mid-1890s, and was characterized by the emergence of the anti-slavery Republican Party, which adopted many of the economic policies of the Whigs, such as national banks, railroads, high tariffs, homesteads and aid to land grant colleges.
The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP (Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
In addition, the first President of the United States, George Washington, was not a member of any political party at the time of his election or throughout his tenure as president.
They typically vote for the candidates of the party that nominated them.

United States presidential election

presidential electionpresidential electionsU.S. presidential election
These two parties have won every United States presidential election since 1852 and have controlled the United States Congress to some extent since at least 1856.
The nomination process, consisting of the primary elections and caucuses and the nominating conventions, was not specified in the Constitution, but was developed over time by the states and political parties.

Third Party System

Thirdof that era1930s
The GOP dominated national politics during the Third Party System, from 1854 to 1896, and the Fourth Party System from 1896 to 1932.
The Third Party System is a term of periodization used by historians and political scientists to describe the history of political parties in the United States from 1854 until the mid-1890s, which featured profound developments in issues of American nationalism, modernization, and race.

Third party (United States)

third partythird-partythird parties
Several third parties also operate in the U.S., and from time to time elect someone to local office.

List of political parties in the United States

political partypartyPolitical parties
Besides the Constitution, Green, and Libertarian parties, there are many other political parties that receive only minimal support and only appear on the ballot in one or a few states.

Fourth Party System

System of 1896an eraFourth
The GOP dominated national politics during the Third Party System, from 1854 to 1896, and the Fourth Party System from 1896 to 1932.

Two-party system

two party systemmajority partytwo major parties
Since the 1850s, they have been the Democratic Party and the Republican Party, This two-party system is based on laws, party rules and custom.

Republicanism in the United States

republicanismRepublicanAmerican republicanism
The need to win popular support in a republic led to the American invention of voter-based political parties in the 1790s.

Anti-Administration party

Anti-AdministrationAnti-FederalistAnti- Administration
The first two-party system consisted of the Federalist Party, who supported the ratification of the Constitution, and the Democratic-Republican Party or the Anti-Administration party (Anti-Federalists), who opposed the powerful central government, among others, that the Constitution established when it took effect in 1789.

History of the United States Republican Party

Republican PartyRepublicanRepublicans
Since the 1850s, they have been the Democratic Party and the Republican Party, This two-party system is based on laws, party rules and custom.

Constitution Party (United States)

Constitution PartyConstitutionU.S. Taxpayers
Besides the Constitution, Green, and Libertarian parties, there are many other political parties that receive only minimal support and only appear on the ballot in one or a few states.

Independent voter

IndependentIndependentsindependent voters
In some states, independents are not allowed to vote in primary elections, but in others, they can vote in any primary election of their choice.

Vox Media

VoxRackedEater
Although the term "independent" often is used as a synonym for "moderate," "centrist," or "swing voter," to refer to a politician or voter who holds views that incorporate facets of both liberal and conservative ideologies, most self-described independents consistently support one of the two major parties when it comes time to vote, according to Vox Media.

Founding Fathers of the United States

Founding FathersFounding FatherFounding Father of the United States
The Founding Fathers did not originally intend for American politics to be partisan.

Federalist No. 9

Federalist Papers No. 99Federalist Papers'' No. 9
In Federalist Papers No. 9 and No. 10, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, respectively, wrote specifically about the dangers of domestic political factions.

Federalist No. 10

No. 10Federalist 10Federalist Paper No. 10
In Federalist Papers No. 9 and No. 10, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, respectively, wrote specifically about the dangers of domestic political factions.