Polymer

polymershomopolymerpolymericchainorganic polymerpolymer chainorganic polymersPolymer technologyhomopolymerizationterminal
A polymer ( Greek poly-, "many" + -mer, "part") is a large molecule, or macromolecule, composed of many repeated subunits.wikipedia
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Polymerization

polymerisationpolymerizepolymerized
Polymers, both natural and synthetic, are created via polymerization of many small molecules, known as monomers.
In polymer chemistry, polymerization is a process of reacting monomer molecules together in a chemical reaction to form polymer chains or three-dimensional networks.

Plastic

plasticsadditivesadditive
Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to natural biopolymers such as DNA and proteins that are fundamental to biological structure and function. The terms polymer and resin are often synonymous with plastic.
Plasticity is the general property of all materials which can deform irreversibly without breaking but, in the class of moldable polymers, this occurs to such a degree that their actual name derives from this specific ability.

Resin

resinsresinouspine resin
The terms polymer and resin are often synonymous with plastic.
In polymer chemistry and materials science, resin is a solid or highly viscous substance of plant or synthetic origin that is typically convertible into polymers.

Monomer

monomersmonomeric-mer
Polymers, both natural and synthetic, are created via polymerization of many small molecules, known as monomers.
A monomer (mono-, "one" + -mer, "part") is a molecule that can be reacted together with other monomer molecules to form a larger polymer chain or three-dimensional network in a process called polymerization.

Crystallization of polymers

semi-crystallinesemi-crystalline polymerpartially crystalline
Their consequently large molecular mass, relative to small molecule compounds, produces unique physical properties including toughness, viscoelasticity, and a tendency to form glasses and semicrystalline structures rather than crystals.
Polymers can crystallize upon cooling from melting, mechanical stretching or solvent evaporation.

Polymer science

Macromolecular sciencepolymer scientistPolymer Science and Engineering
Polymers are studied in the fields of biophysics and macromolecular science, and polymer science (which includes polymer chemistry and polymer physics).
Polymer science or macromolecular science is a subfield of materials science concerned with polymers, primarily synthetic polymers such as plastics and elastomers.

Polymer chemistry

polymer chemistMacromolecular ChemistryHistory of polymer chemistry
Polymers are studied in the fields of biophysics and macromolecular science, and polymer science (which includes polymer chemistry and polymer physics).
Polymer chemistry is a sub-discipline of chemistry that focuses on the chemical synthesis, structure, chemical and physical properties of polymers and macromolecules.

Polymer physics

Polymer physicistmolecular bonds in a polymerphysics
Polymers are studied in the fields of biophysics and macromolecular science, and polymer science (which includes polymer chemistry and polymer physics).
Polymer physics is the field of physics that studies polymers, their fluctuations, mechanical properties, as well as the kinetics of reactions involving degradation and polymerisation of polymers and monomers respectively.

Latex

latex rubbermilkrubber latex
Polyisoprene of latex rubber is an example of a natural/biological polymer, and the polystyrene of styrofoam is an example of a synthetic polymer.
Latex is a stable dispersion (emulsion) of polymer microparticles in an aqueous medium.

Hermann Staudinger

StaudingerStaudinger, Hermann
The modern concept of polymers as covalently bonded macromolecular structures was proposed in 1920 by Hermann Staudinger, who spent the next decade finding experimental evidence for this hypothesis.
Hermann Staudinger (23 March 1881 – 8 September 1965) was a German organic chemist who demonstrated the existence of macromolecules, which he characterized as polymers.

Polystyrene

expanded polystyrenestyrofoampolystyrene foam
Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to natural biopolymers such as DNA and proteins that are fundamental to biological structure and function. Polyisoprene of latex rubber is an example of a natural/biological polymer, and the polystyrene of styrofoam is an example of a synthetic polymer. The list of synthetic polymers, roughly in order of worldwide demand, includes polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, synthetic rubber, phenol formaldehyde resin (or Bakelite), neoprene, nylon, polyacrylonitrile, PVB, silicone, and many more.
Polystyrene (PS) is a synthetic aromatic hydrocarbon polymer made from the monomer styrene.

Protein

proteinsproteinaceousstructural proteins
Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to natural biopolymers such as DNA and proteins that are fundamental to biological structure and function. In biological contexts, essentially all biological macromolecules—i.e., proteins (polyamides), nucleic acids (polynucleotides), and polysaccharides—are purely polymeric, or are composed in large part of polymeric components—e.g., isoprenylated/lipid-modified glycoproteins, where small lipidic molecules and oligosaccharide modifications occur on the polyamide backbone of the protein.
Most proteins consist of linear polymers built from series of up to 20 different L -α- amino acids.

Biopolymer

biopolymersbio-polymerbiological polymers
Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to natural biopolymers such as DNA and proteins that are fundamental to biological structure and function.
Biopolymers are polymers produced by living organisms; in other words, they are polymeric biomolecules.

Glass

glassmakersilicate glassvitreous
Their consequently large molecular mass, relative to small molecule compounds, produces unique physical properties including toughness, viscoelasticity, and a tendency to form glasses and semicrystalline structures rather than crystals.
These sorts of glasses can be made of quite different kinds of materials than silica: metallic alloys, ionic melts, aqueous solutions, molecular liquids, and polymers.

DNA

deoxyribonucleic aciddouble-stranded DNAdsDNA
Polymers range from familiar synthetic plastics such as polystyrene to natural biopolymers such as DNA and proteins that are fundamental to biological structure and function.
DNA is a long polymer made from repeating units called nucleotides, each of which is usually symbolized by a single letter: either A, T, C, or G. The structure of DNA is dynamic along its length, being capable of coiling into tight loops and other shapes.

Oligosaccharide

oligosaccharidesoligo-complex carbohydrates
In biological contexts, essentially all biological macromolecules—i.e., proteins (polyamides), nucleic acids (polynucleotides), and polysaccharides—are purely polymeric, or are composed in large part of polymeric components—e.g., isoprenylated/lipid-modified glycoproteins, where small lipidic molecules and oligosaccharide modifications occur on the polyamide backbone of the protein.
An oligosaccharide (/ˌɑlɪgoʊˈsækəˌɹaɪd/ ; from the Greek ὀλίγος olígos, "a few", and σάκχαρ sácchar, "sugar") is a saccharide polymer containing a small number (typically three to ten ) of monosaccharides (simple sugars).

List of synthetic polymers

synthetic polymertypes of plasticsynthetic polymers
The list of synthetic polymers, roughly in order of worldwide demand, includes polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, synthetic rubber, phenol formaldehyde resin (or Bakelite), neoprene, nylon, polyacrylonitrile, PVB, silicone, and many more.
Synthetic polymers are human-made polymers.

Polypropylene

PPbiaxially-oriented polypropylenebiaxially oriented polypropylene
The list of synthetic polymers, roughly in order of worldwide demand, includes polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, synthetic rubber, phenol formaldehyde resin (or Bakelite), neoprene, nylon, polyacrylonitrile, PVB, silicone, and many more.
Polypropylene (PP), also known as polypropene, is a thermoplastic polymer used in a wide variety of applications.

Polyvinyl chloride

PVCvinylpolyvinylchloride
The list of synthetic polymers, roughly in order of worldwide demand, includes polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, synthetic rubber, phenol formaldehyde resin (or Bakelite), neoprene, nylon, polyacrylonitrile, PVB, silicone, and many more.
Polyvinyl chloride (colloquial: polyvinyl, vinyl ; abbreviated: PVC) is the world's third-most widely produced synthetic plastic polymer, after polyethylene and polypropylene.

Synthetic rubber

rubberartificial rubbersynthetic
The list of synthetic polymers, roughly in order of worldwide demand, includes polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, synthetic rubber, phenol formaldehyde resin (or Bakelite), neoprene, nylon, polyacrylonitrile, PVB, silicone, and many more.
These are mainly polymers synthesized from petroleum byproducts.

Cellulose

cellulolyticcellulosiccellulose ester
A variety of other natural polymers exist, such as cellulose, which is the main constituent of wood and paper.
Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth.

Nucleic acid

nucleic acidsNAmolecular basis
In biological contexts, essentially all biological macromolecules—i.e., proteins (polyamides), nucleic acids (polynucleotides), and polysaccharides—are purely polymeric, or are composed in large part of polymeric components—e.g., isoprenylated/lipid-modified glycoproteins, where small lipidic molecules and oligosaccharide modifications occur on the polyamide backbone of the protein.
If the sugar is a compound ribose, the polymer is RNA (ribonucleic acid); if the sugar is derived from ribose as deoxyribose, the polymer is DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid).

Silicone

siliconespolysiloxanesilicone gel
The list of synthetic polymers, roughly in order of worldwide demand, includes polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, synthetic rubber, phenol formaldehyde resin (or Bakelite), neoprene, nylon, polyacrylonitrile, PVB, silicone, and many more.
Silicones, also known as polysiloxanes, are polymers that include any synthetic compound made up of repeating units of siloxane, which is a chain of alternating silicon atoms and oxygen atoms, combined with carbon, hydrogen, and sometimes other elements.

Nylon

Bri-Nylonnylon 6,6Nylons
The list of synthetic polymers, roughly in order of worldwide demand, includes polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, synthetic rubber, phenol formaldehyde resin (or Bakelite), neoprene, nylon, polyacrylonitrile, PVB, silicone, and many more.
It is made of repeating units linked by amide links similar to the peptide bonds in proteins.

Polyacrylonitrile

PANpoly(acrylonitrile)
The list of synthetic polymers, roughly in order of worldwide demand, includes polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, synthetic rubber, phenol formaldehyde resin (or Bakelite), neoprene, nylon, polyacrylonitrile, PVB, silicone, and many more.
Polyacrylonitrile (PAN), also known as polyvinyl cyanide and Creslan 61, is a synthetic, semicrystalline organic polymer resin, with the linear formula (C 3 H 3 N) n.