Pompey

Pompey the GreatGnaeus Pompeius MagnusPompeiusGnaeus PompeiusPompeius MagnusPompey MagnusPompeianGnaeus Pompey MagnusPompeius Magnus ("Pompey the Great")Gnaeus Pompey
Gnaeus Pompey Magnus (Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus) (29 September 106 BC – 28 September 48 BC), usually known in English as Pompey or Pompey the Great, was a military and political leader of the late Roman Republic.wikipedia
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Magnus

Magnús
His success as a military commander in Sulla's second civil war resulted in Sulla's bestowing upon him the cognomen Magnus ("the Great"), after Pompey’s boyhood hero Alexander the Great.
The name was used as cognomen of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus in the first century BC.

First Triumvirate

triumvirtriumviratetriumvirs
In 60 BC, Pompey joined Crassus and Gaius Julius Caesar in the unofficial military-political alliance known as the First Triumvirate, which Pompey's marriage to Caesar's daughter Julia helped secure.
The First Triumvirate (60–53 BC) was an informal alliance between three prominent Roman politicians: Gaius Julius Caesar, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, and Marcus Licinius Crassus, at the end of the Roman Republic.

Julius Caesar

CaesarGaius Julius CaesarJulius Cæsar
In 60 BC, Pompey joined Crassus and Gaius Julius Caesar in the unofficial military-political alliance known as the First Triumvirate, which Pompey's marriage to Caesar's daughter Julia helped secure.
In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus and Pompey formed the First Triumvirate, a political alliance that dominated Roman politics for several years.

Picenum

PicenePicenoPiceni
He came from a wealthy Italian provincial background; his father had been the first to establish the family among the nobiles (Roman nobility).
Picenum was also the birthplace of such Roman notables as Pompey the Great and his father Pompeius Strabo.

Roman Republic

RomanRepublicRomans
Gnaeus Pompey Magnus (Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus) (29 September 106 BC – 28 September 48 BC), usually known in English as Pompey or Pompey the Great, was a military and political leader of the late Roman Republic.
These multiple tensions led to a series of civil wars; the first between the two generals Julius Caesar and Pompey.

Caesar's Civil War

Civil WarRoman Civil WarGreat Roman Civil War
Pompey and Caesar then contended for the leadership of the Roman state, leading to a civil war.
It began as a series of political and military confrontations, between Julius Caesar (100–44 BC), his political supporters (broadly known as Populares), and his legions, against the Optimates (or Boni), the politically conservative and socially traditionalist faction of the Roman Senate, who were supported by Pompey (106–48 BC) and his legions.

Julia (daughter of Caesar)

JuliaJulia CaesarisJulia (daughter of Julius Caesar)
In 60 BC, Pompey joined Crassus and Gaius Julius Caesar in the unofficial military-political alliance known as the First Triumvirate, which Pompey's marriage to Caesar's daughter Julia helped secure.
Julia became the fourth wife of Pompey the Great and was renowned for her beauty and virtue.

Marcus Licinius Crassus

CrassusMarcus CrassusLicinius Crassus
In 60 BC, Pompey joined Crassus and Gaius Julius Caesar in the unofficial military-political alliance known as the First Triumvirate, which Pompey's marriage to Caesar's daughter Julia helped secure. Pompey was consul three times (twice with Marcus Licinius Crassus and once without a partner) and celebrated three Roman triumphs.
Crassus rose to political prominence following his victory over the slave revolt led by Spartacus, sharing the consulship with his rival Pompey the Great.

Battle of Pharsalus

PharsalusBattle of PharsaliaBattle of Pharsulus
When in that war Pompey was defeated at the Battle of Pharsalus, in 48 BC, he sought refuge in Egypt, where he was assassinated.
On 9 August 48 BC at Pharsalus in central Greece, Gaius Julius Caesar and his allies formed up opposite the army of the republic under the command of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus ("Pompey the Great").

Roman triumph

triumphtriumphstriumphal
Pompey was consul three times (twice with Marcus Licinius Crassus and once without a partner) and celebrated three Roman triumphs.
Pompey postponed his third and most magnificent triumph for several months to make it coincide with his own dies natalis (birthday).

Cognomen

cognominacognominalCamillus
His success as a military commander in Sulla's second civil war resulted in Sulla's bestowing upon him the cognomen Magnus ("the Great"), after Pompey’s boyhood hero Alexander the Great.
One example of this is Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, whose cognomen Magnus was earned after his military victories under Sulla's dictatorship.

Optimates

optimateboniconservative
After Crassus and Julia's deaths, Pompey sided with the Optimates, the conservative faction of the Roman Senate. He supported Sulla, who belonged to the Optimates, the pro-aristocracy faction, against Marius, who belonged to the Populares (in favour of the people), in Sulla's first civil war (88–87 BC).
Although suspicious of powerful generals, they sided with Pompey when they came to believe that Julius Caesar—himself a Popularis—planned a coup against the Republic.

Sextus Pompey

Sextus PompeiusSextusPompeius
Pompey and Mucia had three children: The eldest, Gnaeus Pompey (Pompey the Younger), Pompeia Magna, a daughter, and Sextus Pompey, the younger son.
His father was Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great).

Battle of Utica (81 BC)

battle of Uticadefeatedhe defeated Domitius
Domitius was subsequently defeated at the battle of Utica and died when Pompey attacked his camp.
The Battle of Utica of 81 BC was fought near Utica between a Roman army under the command of Gnaeus Pompeius (better known as Pompey) and another Roman army under the command of Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus.

Sulla's second civil war

civil warSecond Civil Warsecond war
His success as a military commander in Sulla's second civil war resulted in Sulla's bestowing upon him the cognomen Magnus ("the Great"), after Pompey’s boyhood hero Alexander the Great.

Aulus Gabinius

GabiniusA. GabiniusConsul Gabinius Secundus
On Pompey's staff were his old lieutenant Afranius, D. Laelius, Petreius, C. Cornelius, probably Gabinius and Varro.
He was an avid supporter of Pompey who likewise supported Gabinius.

Sulla's first civil war

civil warFirst Civil Warmarched his legions on Rome
He supported Sulla, who belonged to the Optimates, the pro-aristocracy faction, against Marius, who belonged to the Populares (in favour of the people), in Sulla's first civil war (88–87 BC).
He outshone both Marius and the consul Gnaeus Pompeius Strabo (the father of Pompey Magnus).

Marcus Perperna Vento

Marcus PerpennaMarcus Perpenna VentoMarcus Perperna
The survivors of the Marians, those who were exiled after they lost Rome and those who escaped Sulla's persecution of his opponents, were given refuge on Sicily by Marcus Perpenna Vento.
He conspired against and assassinated Quintus Sertorius, and was defeated and executed by Pompey the Great.

Marcus Petreius

Petreius
On Pompey's staff were his old lieutenant Afranius, D. Laelius, Petreius, C. Cornelius, probably Gabinius and Varro.
He was a client of Pompey and like Pompey he came from Picenum a region in eastern Italy.

Battle of Lauron

the battle of Lauronsubstantial defeat
According to Appian, as soon as Pompey arrived, he marched to lift the siege of Lauron, here he suffered a substantial defeat at the hands of Sertorius himself.
The Battle of Lauron (also known as the battle of Lauro) was fought in 76 BC by a rebel force under the command of the Roman rebel Quintus Sertorius and a Roman Republican army under the command of the Roman general Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (better known as Pompey).

Battle of Saguntum (75 BC)

Battle of SaguntumBattle of SeguntiaSaguntum
There they fougth Sertorius in the inconclusive Battle of Seguntia.
The Battle of Saguntum was fought in 75 BC between forces of the Roman Republic under the command of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus and Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius and an army of Sertorian rebels under the command of Quintus Sertorius.

Battle of Sucro

Sucrothe battle of Sucro
Pompey and Sertorius, both not wanting to wait for the arrival of Metellus (Pompey wanted the glory of finishing of Sertorius for himself and Sertorius did not relish fighting two armies at once), hastily engaged in the indecisive Battle of Sucro.
The Battle of Sucro was fought in 75 BC between a rebel army under the command of the Roman rebel Quintus Sertorius and a Roman army under the command of the Roman general Pompey.

Marcus Terentius Varro

VarroMarcus VarroVarro Reatinus
On Pompey's staff were his old lieutenant Afranius, D. Laelius, Petreius, C. Cornelius, probably Gabinius and Varro.
He supported Pompey, reaching the office of praetor, after having been tribune of the people, quaestor and curule aedile.

Battle of Valentia 75 BC

battle near Valentiabattle of ValentiaValentia
In a battle near Valentia Pompey defeated Perpenna and Herennius and regained some of his prestige.
The Battle of Valentia was fought in 75 BC between a rebel army under the command of Marcus Perpenna Vento and general called Herennius both legates of the Roman rebel Quintus Sertorius and a Roman Republican army under the command of the Roman general Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (better known as Pompey the Great).

Sertorian War

his warIberian campaignsinsurrection in Iberia
He was able to rally the local tribes, particularly the Lusitanians and the Celtiberians, in what came to be called the Sertorian War (80-72 BC).
The war ended after Sertorius was assassinated by Marcus Perperna, who was then promptly defeated by Pompey.