A report on Pope Gelasius I

Statue of Gelasius I, Schloss Stainz
Image of c. AD 870 featuring the coronation of Charles the Bald, flanked by Gelasius I and Gregory the Great. Gelasius' writings gave him a high status with posterity.

The bishop of Rome from 1 March 492 to his death on 19 November 496.

- Pope Gelasius I
Statue of Gelasius I, Schloss Stainz

11 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Gelasian Decree

1 links

The Gelasian Decree (Decretum Gelasianum) is a Latin text traditionally thought to be a Decretal of the prolific Pope Gelasius I, bishop of Rome from 492–496.

Blessing of candles on Candlemas at an American Episcopal church

Candlemas

1 links

Christian holiday commemorating the presentation of Jesus at the Temple.

Christian holiday commemorating the presentation of Jesus at the Temple.

Blessing of candles on Candlemas at an American Episcopal church
Candlemas day by Marianne Stokes, 1901
The presentation of the Lord in the temple by Fra Bartolomeo, 1516
Crêpes are a traditional food on La Chandeleur
Our Lady of Light (patron of the Canary Islands). The Virgin of Candles is depicted in the manner of a Black Madonna.
Diablada puneña during the Fiesta de la Candelaria in Peru.

Pope Gelasius I (492–496) contributed to the spread of the celebration, but did not invent it.

Lupercalia most likely derives from lupus, "wolf", though both the etymology and its significance are obscure (bronze wolf's head, 1st century AD)

Lupercalia

1 links

Pastoral festival of Ancient Rome observed annually on February 15 to purify the city, promoting health and fertility.

Pastoral festival of Ancient Rome observed annually on February 15 to purify the city, promoting health and fertility.

Lupercalia most likely derives from lupus, "wolf", though both the etymology and its significance are obscure (bronze wolf's head, 1st century AD)
The Lupercalian Festival in Rome (ca. 1578–1610), drawing by the circle of Adam Elsheimer, showing the Luperci dressed as dogs and goats, with Cupid and personifications of fertility
Caesar Refuses the Diadem (1894), when it was offered by Mark Antony during the Lupercalia

Pope Gelasius I (494–96) claimed that only the "vile rabble" were involved in the festival and sought its forceful abolition; the Roman Senate protested that the Lupercalia was essential to Rome's safety and well-being.

A scroll of the Book of Esther; one of the five megillot of the Tanakh.

Biblical canon

1 links

Set of texts which a particular Jewish or Christian religious community regards as part of the Bible.

Set of texts which a particular Jewish or Christian religious community regards as part of the Bible.

A scroll of the Book of Esther; one of the five megillot of the Tanakh.
The Abisha Scroll, the oldest scroll among the Samaritans in Nablus.
A manuscript page from P46, an early 3rd-century collection of Pauline epistles.
The contents page in a complete 80 book King James Bible, listing "The Books of the Old Testament", "The Books called Apocrypha", and "The Books of the New Testament".
The books of the Old Testament, showing their positions in both the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible, shown with their names in Hebrew) and Christian Bibles. The Deuterocanon shown in yellow and the Apocrypha shown in grey are not accepted by some major denominations; the Protocanon shown in red, orange, green, and blue are the Hebrew Bible books considered canonical by all major denominations.

Philip Schaff says that "the council of Hippo in 393, and the third (according to another reckoning the sixth) council of Carthage in 397, under the influence of Augustine, who attended both, fixed the catholic canon of the Holy Scriptures, including the Apocrypha of the Old Testament, ... This decision of the transmarine church however, was subject to ratification; and the concurrence of the Roman see it received when Innocent I and Gelasius I (A.D. 414) repeated the same index of biblical books. This canon remained undisturbed till the sixteenth century, and was sanctioned by the council of Trent at its fourth session."

The Triumph of Saint Valentine painted by Valentin Metzinger, early 18th century

Saint Valentine

0 links

3rd-century Roman saint, commemorated in Western Christianity on February 14 and in Eastern Orthodoxy on July 6.

3rd-century Roman saint, commemorated in Western Christianity on February 14 and in Eastern Orthodoxy on July 6.

The Triumph of Saint Valentine painted by Valentin Metzinger, early 18th century
Saint Valentine of Terni oversees the construction of his basilica at Terni, from a 14th-century French manuscript (BN, Mss fr. 185)
Saint Valentine is said to have ministered to the faithful amidst the persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire.
224x224px
Shrine of Saint Valentine in Whitefriar Street Carmelite Church in Dublin, Ireland
Relic of Saint Valentine in the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, Rome

The feast of St. Valentine of February 14 was first established in 496 by Pope Gelasius I, who included Valentine among all those "... whose names are justly reverenced among men, but whose acts are known only to God."

Pope Francis in 2021

Pope

0 links

Bishop of Rome (or historically the patriarch of Rome ), head of the worldwide Catholic Church, and also serves as head of state or sovereign of the Vatican City State since the eighth century.

Bishop of Rome (or historically the patriarch of Rome ), head of the worldwide Catholic Church, and also serves as head of state or sovereign of the Vatican City State since the eighth century.

Pope Francis in 2021
Gregory the Great (c. 540–604) who established medieval themes in the Church, in a painting by Carlo Saraceni, c. 1610, Rome.
A historical map of the Mediterranean states in 1400. The Western Schism lasted from 1378 to 1417.
As part of the Catholic Reformation, Pope Paul III (1534–49) initiated the Council of Trent (1545–63), which established the triumph of the papacy over those who sought to reconcile with Protestants or oppose papal claims.
The Delivery of the Keys painted by Pietro Perugino (1492)
The conclave in Konstanz where Pope Martin V was elected
The formal declaration of "Habemus Papam" after the election of Pope Martin V
Funeral of Pope John Paul II at the Vatican in April 2005, presided over by Cardinal Ratzinger, the future Pope Benedict XVI
Entrance to Vatican City, with inscription "Benedictus XVI Pont(ifex) Max(imus) Anno Domini MMV Pont(ificatus) I.", i.e., "Benedict XVI, Pontifex Maximus, in the year of Our Lord 2005, the first year of his pontificate."
The coat of arms of the Holy See. That of the State of Vatican City is the same except that the positions of the gold and silver keys are interchanged.
1881 illustration depicting papal infallibility
Pope Pius XII, wearing the traditional 1877 Papal tiara, is carried through St. Peter's Basilica on a sedia gestatoria c. 1955.
Pope Pius VII, bishop of Rome, seated, and Cardinal Caprara.
Antichristus, a woodcut by Lucas Cranach of the pope using the temporal power to grant authority to a generously contributing ruler
Antichristus, by Lucas Cranach the Elder, from Luther's 1521 Passionary of the Christ and Antichrist. The pope is signing and selling indulgences.
Christus, by Lucas Cranach. This woodcut of John 13:14–17 is from Passionary of the Christ and Antichrist. Cranach shows Jesus kissing Peter's foot during the footwashing. This stands in contrast to the opposing woodcut, where the pope demands others kiss his foot.
Antichristus, by the Lutheran Lucas Cranach the Elder. This woodcut of the traditional practice of kissing the pope's foot is from Passionary of the Christ and Antichrist.
Pope Pius IX, the pope with the longest verifiable reign
Pope Urban VII, the shortest-reigning pope

The first record of the application of this title to a bishop of Rome appears in a synod of 495 with reference to Gelasius I.

Famuli vestrae pietatis

0 links

Famuli vestrae pietatis, also known by the Latin mnemonic duo sunt ("there are two"), is a letter written in 494 by Pope Gelasius I to Byzantine Emperor Anastasius I Dicorus on the relationship between religious and secular officials.

Pius IX opening the First Vatican Council, illustration. It is during this council that papal supremacy was proclaimed a dogma.

Papal supremacy

0 links

Doctrine of the Catholic Church that the Pope, by reason of his office as Vicar of Christ, the visible source and foundation of the unity both of the bishops and of the whole company of the faithful, and as pastor of the entire Catholic Church, has full, supreme, and universal power over the whole church, a power which he can always exercise unhindered: that, in brief, "the Pope enjoys, by divine institution, supreme, full, immediate, and universal power in the care of souls."

Doctrine of the Catholic Church that the Pope, by reason of his office as Vicar of Christ, the visible source and foundation of the unity both of the bishops and of the whole company of the faithful, and as pastor of the entire Catholic Church, has full, supreme, and universal power over the whole church, a power which he can always exercise unhindered: that, in brief, "the Pope enjoys, by divine institution, supreme, full, immediate, and universal power in the care of souls."

Pius IX opening the First Vatican Council, illustration. It is during this council that papal supremacy was proclaimed a dogma.
Inscription at front of Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran, cathedral church of the Bishop of Rome: Sacros(ancta) Lateran(ensis) eccles(ia) omnium urbis et orbis ecclesiarum mater et caput meaning "Most Holy Lateran Church, of all the churches in the city and the world, the Mother and Head"

Gelasius I, who served from 492 to 496, in a controversy with Anastasius, the Byzantine emperor, likewise fought to maintain the doctrine of papal supremacy.

Euphemius of Constantinople

0 links

Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople (490–496).

Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople (490–496).

Pope Felix insisted that heretics and favourers of heresy should not be prayed for publicly; Euphemius repeated his attempts at reconciliation to Pope Gelasius I, but the problem of his predecessors remained; Euphemius could not remove their names from the diptychs without causing embarrassment or insult to those they had baptized and ordained.

Europe 500 AD, in the midst of the schism . Western Europe was loyal to the Bishop of Rome (then Pope Symmachus).

Acacian schism

0 links

The Acacian schism, between the Eastern and Western Christian Churches, lasted 35 years, from 484 to 519 AD.

The Acacian schism, between the Eastern and Western Christian Churches, lasted 35 years, from 484 to 519 AD.

Europe 500 AD, in the midst of the schism . Western Europe was loyal to the Bishop of Rome (then Pope Symmachus).

Felix's successor Gelasius also refused any compromise as a betrayal of the Council of Chalcedon.