Portmanteau

portmanteau wordportmanteauscombinationportemanteauportmanteauxportmanteau abbreviationPortmanteau wordsportmanteuportmanteuxabbreviated
A portmanteau or portmanteau word is a linguistic blend of words, in which parts of multiple words or their phones (sounds) are combined into a new word, as in smog, coined by blending smoke and fog, or motel, from motor and hotel.wikipedia
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The Hunting of the Snark

Snark IslandThe Hunting of the Snark. An Agony in Eight Fits
In his introduction to The Hunting of the Snark, Carroll uses portmanteau when discussing lexical selection:
Written from 1874 to 1876, the poem borrows the setting, some creatures, and eight portmanteau words from Carroll's earlier poem "Jabberwocky" in his children's novel Through the Looking-Glass (1871).

Blend word

blendblendingblended
In his introduction to The Hunting of the Snark, Carroll uses portmanteau when discussing lexical selection: A portmanteau or portmanteau word is a linguistic blend of words, in which parts of multiple words or their phones (sounds) are combined into a new word,
1) The end of one word is appended to the beginning of the other (see portmanteau). For example, brunch is a blend of breakfast and lunch.

Contraction (grammar)

contractioncontractionscontracted
The definition overlaps with the grammatical term contraction, but contractions are formed from words that would otherwise appear together in sequence, such as do and not to make don't, whereas a portmanteau word is formed by combining two or more existing words that all relate to a singular concept.
The definition overlaps with the term portmanteau (a linguistic blend), but a distinction can be made between a portmanteau and a contraction by noting that contractions are formed from words that would otherwise appear together in sequence, such as do and not, whereas a portmanteau word is formed by combining two or more existing words that all relate to a singular concept which the portmanteau describes.

Eurasia

Eurasian continentEurasiannorthern Eurasia
Similarly Eurasia is a portmanteau of Europe and Asia.
The term is a portmanteau of its constituent continents (Europe and Asia).

Brunch

breakfastsbrunches
In Punch in 1896, the word brunch (breakfast + lunch) was introduced as a "portmanteau word."
The word is a portmanteau of breakfast and lunch.

Neologism

neologismscoinedneologistic
Many neologisms are examples of blends, but many blends have become part of the lexicon.
Portmanteaux are combined words that are sometimes used commonly.

Calexico, California

CalexicoCalexico, California, United StatesCalifornia (Calexico)
Some city names are portmanteaus of the border regions they straddle: Texarkana spreads across the Texas-Arkansas border, while Calexico and Mexicali are respectively the American and Mexican sides of a single conurbation.
The name of the city is a portmanteau of California and Mexico, which, like that of its adjacent sister city of Mexicali, emphasizes its identity as a border city.

Through the Looking-Glass

Alice Through the Looking GlassThrough the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found ThereThrough the Looking Glass
The word portmanteau was first used in this sense by Lewis Carroll in the book Through the Looking-Glass (1871), in which Humpty Dumpty explains to Alice the coinage of the unusual words in "Jabberwocky", where slithy means "slimy and lithe" and mimsy is "miserable and flimsy".
In the process, he introduces Alice to the concept of portmanteau words, before his inevitable fall.

Microsoft

Microsoft CorporationMSMicrosoft Corp.
Many company or brand names are portmanteaus, including Microsoft, a portmanteau of microcomputer and software; the cheese "Cambozola" combines a similar rind to "Camembert" with the same mold used to make "Gorgonzola"; passenger rail company "Amtrak", a portmanteau of "America" and "track"; "Velcro", a portmanteau of the French "Velours" (velvet) and "Crochet" (hook); "Verizon," a portmanteau of "veritas" (Latin for truth) and "horizon"; and ComEd (a Chicago-area electric utility company), a portmanteau of "Commonwealth" and Edison (Thomas Edison).
The word "Microsoft" is a portmanteau of "microcomputer" and "software".

Amtrak

Amtrak trainsAmtrak’sNational Railroad Passenger Corporation
Many company or brand names are portmanteaus, including Microsoft, a portmanteau of microcomputer and software; the cheese "Cambozola" combines a similar rind to "Camembert" with the same mold used to make "Gorgonzola"; passenger rail company "Amtrak", a portmanteau of "America" and "track"; "Velcro", a portmanteau of the French "Velours" (velvet) and "Crochet" (hook); "Verizon," a portmanteau of "veritas" (Latin for truth) and "horizon"; and ComEd (a Chicago-area electric utility company), a portmanteau of "Commonwealth" and Edison (Thomas Edison).
The name Amtrak is a portmanteau of the words America and trak, the latter itself a sensational spelling of track.

Gerrymandering

gerrymandergerrymanderedgerrymanders
Portmanteau words may be produced by joining together proper nouns with common nouns, such as "gerrymandering", which refers to the scheme of Massachusetts Governor Elbridge Gerry for politically contrived redistricting; the perimeter of one of the districts thereby created resembled a very curvy salamander in outline.
Gerrymander is a portmanteau of the governor's last name and the word salamander.

Oxbridge

Oxford and CambridgeOxford or Cambridgeancient university
Oxbridge is a common portmanteau for the UK's two oldest universities, those of Oxford and Cambridge.
Oxbridge is a portmanteau of "Oxford" and "Cambridge", the two oldest, most prestigious, and highly-ranked universities in the United Kingdom.

Brexit

leave the European Unionleaveleave the EU
In 2016, Britains planned exit from the European Union became known as "Brexit". David Beckham's English mansion Rowneybury House was nicknamed "Beckingham Palace", a portmanteau of his surname and Buckingham Palace.
Brexit ( or ), a portmanteau of "British" and "exit", is the impending withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU).

Verizon Communications

VerizonBell AtlanticGTE
Many company or brand names are portmanteaus, including Microsoft, a portmanteau of microcomputer and software; the cheese "Cambozola" combines a similar rind to "Camembert" with the same mold used to make "Gorgonzola"; passenger rail company "Amtrak", a portmanteau of "America" and "track"; "Velcro", a portmanteau of the French "Velours" (velvet) and "Crochet" (hook); "Verizon," a portmanteau of "veritas" (Latin for truth) and "horizon"; and ComEd (a Chicago-area electric utility company), a portmanteau of "Commonwealth" and Edison (Thomas Edison).
Bell Atlantic, the surviving entity, changed its name to "Verizon", a portmanteau of veritas (Latin for "truth") and horizon.

Commonwealth Edison

ComEdPublic Service Company of Northern IllinoisChicago Edison Company
Many company or brand names are portmanteaus, including Microsoft, a portmanteau of microcomputer and software; the cheese "Cambozola" combines a similar rind to "Camembert" with the same mold used to make "Gorgonzola"; passenger rail company "Amtrak", a portmanteau of "America" and "track"; "Velcro", a portmanteau of the French "Velours" (velvet) and "Crochet" (hook); "Verizon," a portmanteau of "veritas" (Latin for truth) and "horizon"; and ComEd (a Chicago-area electric utility company), a portmanteau of "Commonwealth" and Edison (Thomas Edison).
The company's name is a portmanteau and syllabic abbreviation of Commonwealth and Thomas

Spork

For example, a spork is an eating utensil that is a combination of a spoon and a fork, and a skort is an item of clothing that is part skirt, part shorts.
A spork (a portmanteau of spoon and fork), is a hybrid form of cutlery taking the form of a spoon-like shallow scoop with two to four tines.

Skort

skorts
For example, a spork is an eating utensil that is a combination of a spoon and a fork, and a skort is an item of clothing that is part skirt, part shorts.
The term "skort" (a portmanteau of skirt and shorts) is used idiomatically in some regions.

Playmander

The term gerrymander has itself contributed to portmanteau terms bjelkemander and playmander.
The word Playmander is a portmanteau word derived from the name of Premier Sir Thomas Playford and the political term gerrymander, and was coined around 1971 by political scientists Neal Blewett and Dean Jaensch of Flinders University,

Bjelkemander

electoral malaportionmentelectoral malapportionmentzonal system of electoral representation
The term gerrymander has itself contributed to portmanteau terms bjelkemander and playmander.
The term is a portmanteau of Joh Bjelke-Petersen's surname with the word "Gerrymander", where electoral boundaries are redrawn in an unnatural way with the dominant intention of favouring one political party or grouping over its rivals.

Supercouple

power couplesuper couplesupercouples
This is particularly seen in cases of fictional and real-life "supercouples".
Examples are the former pairing of Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez (which became known by the portmanteau "Bennifer"), and the former relationship of Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie ("Brangelina").

Turducken

gooduckenmulti-legged turkeyten bird roast
On the other hand, turducken, a dish made by inserting a chicken into a duck, and the duck into a turkey, was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 2010.
The word turducken is a portmanteau of turkey, duck, and chicken.

Mexicali

Mexicali, Baja CaliforniaMexicali, MexicoMEX
Some city names are portmanteaus of the border regions they straddle: Texarkana spreads across the Texas-Arkansas border, while Calexico and Mexicali are respectively the American and Mexican sides of a single conurbation.
The Mexican side was named Mexicali (a portmanteau composed of "Mexico" and "California") by Coronel Agustín Sanguinéz.

Thanksgivukkah

Holidays are another example, as in Thanksgivukkah, a portmanteau neologism given to the convergence of the American holiday of Thanksgiving and the first day of the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah on Thursday, 28 November 2013.
Thanksgivukkah is a holiday name portmanteau neologism given to the convergence of the American holiday of Thanksgiving and the first day (and second night) of the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah on Thursday, November 28, 2013.

Jabberwocky

Jabberwockgalumphingslithy
The word portmanteau was first used in this sense by Lewis Carroll in the book Through the Looking-Glass (1871), in which Humpty Dumpty explains to Alice the coinage of the unusual words in "Jabberwocky", where slithy means "slimy and lithe" and mimsy is "miserable and flimsy".
Carroll's grave playfulness has been compared with that of the poet Edward Lear; there are also parallels with the work of Gerard Manley Hopkins in the frequent use of soundplay, alliteration, created-language and portmanteau.

Luzviminda

Another Filipino portmanteau is a popular but slightly dated female name Luzviminda derived from the Philippines' three major island groups Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.
Luzviminda (sometimes LuzViMinda) is a portmanteau of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao, the names of the three major Philippine island groups.