Ports of Auckland

Port of AucklandAucklandPort2012 Auckland waterfront disputeAuckland Port2011 Ports of Auckland industrial disputeAuckland harbourAuckland Harbour BoardAuckland's portsFreyberg Wharf
Ports of Auckland Limited (POAL), the successor to the Auckland Harbour Board, is the Auckland Council-owned company administering Auckland's commercial freight and cruise ship harbour facilities.wikipedia
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Waitematā Harbour

Waitemata HarbourAuckland HarbourWaitematā
The Port of Auckland is a large container and international trade port on the Waitematā Harbour, lying on the central and eastern Auckland waterfront (north of Auckland CBD).
With an area of 70 mi2, it connects the city's main port and the Auckland waterfront to the Hauraki Gulf and the Pacific Ocean.

Auckland Council

Local boardAucklandRegional Facilities Auckland
Ports of Auckland Limited (POAL), the successor to the Auckland Harbour Board, is the Auckland Council-owned company administering Auckland's commercial freight and cruise ship harbour facilities.
A variety of often public transport-focused projects like the Northern Busway as well as significant rail and public transport investments were realised through the Auckland Regional Transport Authority, much of it supported by retaining Ports of Auckland in public hands (after the deregulation of the Auckland Harbour Board) to fund the improvements with the dividends.

Auckland waterfront

Auckland's waterfrontQueens wharf
The Port of Auckland is a large container and international trade port on the Waitematā Harbour, lying on the central and eastern Auckland waterfront (north of Auckland CBD).
Previously mostly dominated by Ports of Auckland uses, from the 2000s on it is becoming increasingly open to recreational public use, with a number of former wharves being converted to office, entertainment, and later also some residential uses.

Wynyard Quarter

Western ReclamationTank FarmWynyard Wharf
The port became too shallow for large, modern ships and negotiations were under way in 2015 by Auckland Council to sell it to the council entity Panuku Development Auckland, which wanted to turn it into a waterfront village, apartments and shops in a style similar to Wynyard Quarter.
As of 2012, a good part of the area is still covered by petrol and liquid chemical storage facilities of Ports of Auckland Ltd (POAL) and various other companies, that gave the area its now slowly disappearing "Tank Farm" moniker.

Auckland CBD

central AucklandAuckland Central Business Districtcentral business district
The Port of Auckland is a large container and international trade port on the Waitematā Harbour, lying on the central and eastern Auckland waterfront (north of Auckland CBD). After the Auckland Harbour Board was established in 1871 by the Council, further wharves were added and massive reclamation works were undertaken, eventually making Freemans Bay and Mechanics Bay lose their natural shoreline, while Commercial Bay (today the site of much of the Auckland CBD and the Auckland waterfront) was totally lost to history.
With 8,500 businesses, the CBD accounts for 18% of all businesses in Auckland City, with the largest being Ports of Auckland, and the largest employment sectors being financial services, business and ICT services.

Stadium New Zealand

new stadium
However, Ports of Auckland, who use the land as a shipping container terminal, expressed concern that construction would not be finished in time for the 2011 Rugby World Cup, and that the new site would remove land important for the continuing function of the country's largest commercial port.

Manukau Harbour

ManukauManukau bar
This second harbour is a smaller facility near Onehunga on the Manukau Harbour, south of Auckland City.
For this reason, along with the harbour's shallowness, it is not Auckland's favoured port, and, with only one short wharf, the facilities at Onehunga are tiny compared to the other Ports of Auckland facilities on the Waitematā Harbour along the northeast of the isthmus.

Auckland

Auckland, New ZealandAuckland New ZealandAuckland, NZ
As the company operates all of the associated facilities in the Greater Auckland area (excluding the ferry terminals and local marinas for recreational yachting), this article is about both the current company and the ports of Auckland themselves.
Auckland's ports are the second largest of the country, behind the Port of Tauranga, and a large part of both inbound and outbound New Zealand commerce travels through them, mostly via the facilities northeast of Auckland CBD.

Mechanics Bay

Mechanics Bay HeliportJudges Bay
The 55 hectare of wharves and storage areas (mostly for containers, cars and other large shipments) are almost exclusively situated on reclaimed land, mostly in the former Commercial Bay, Official Bay and in Mechanics Bay. After the Auckland Harbour Board was established in 1871 by the Council, further wharves were added and massive reclamation works were undertaken, eventually making Freemans Bay and Mechanics Bay lose their natural shoreline, while Commercial Bay (today the site of much of the Auckland CBD and the Auckland waterfront) was totally lost to history.
It is located next to the Auckland Marine Rescue Centre at the eastern end of the Ports of Auckland container terminal.

Princes Wharf

In the 2005/2006 season, POAL catered for 48 cruise ship visits (at the Overseas Passenger Terminal, Princes Wharf), with more than 100,000 passengers passing through the port, mostly disembarking for short stopover trips into Auckland or the surrounding region.
The wharf now contains the renovated Overseas Passenger Terminal (berthing of cruise ships) of Ports of Auckland, a Hilton hotel, various restaurants as well as apartments, office space and a multi-story parking building.

Auckland Harbour Board

Harbour Board
After the Auckland Harbour Board was established in 1871 by the Council, further wharves were added and massive reclamation works were undertaken, eventually making Freemans Bay and Mechanics Bay lose their natural shoreline, while Commercial Bay (today the site of much of the Auckland CBD and the Auckland waterfront) was totally lost to history.
Its successor organisation is Ports of Auckland, which assumed the possessions and responsibilities of the Harbour Board.

Chelsea Sugar Refinery

Chelsea golden syrup
Chelsea Wharf, in Birkenhead, North Shore City, not part of the current POAL facilities, serves the Chelsea Sugar Refinery, which has operated since 1884.
It remains private, but arrivals at the port are recorded by the Ports of Auckland and subject to Customs and MAF regulations.

Wiri

Wiri, Auckland
From early 2010, Ports of Auckland has operated a new inland port / rail siding in Wiri to connect road freight to the port facilities via freight trains.
As of 2009, Ports of Auckland is building an inland port / rail siding in Wiri, to connect road freight to the port facilities on the Waitemata Harbour further north.

Auckland Regional Council

Auckland Regional AuthorityARCexisting regional council
On 1 April 2005 Auckland Regional Holdings, part of the former Auckland Regional Council, which held the remaining 80% of shares in the company, made a takeover offer at $8 a share.
Port authorities were considered part of local government and the Auckland Harbour Board was corporatised in 1988 as Ports of Auckland, with the majority shareholding held by the ARA and the minority by Waikato local government.

Point Britomart

Fort BritomartBritomartBritomart Point
After control of the Waitematā Harbour passed to the Auckland Provincial Council in 1853, the Council did much work on improving the facilities, which included constructing the first Queen Street Wharf, building a quay along Customs Street and a breakwater at Point Britomart.
In 2018 Ngāti Whātua-o-Ōrākei and Ports of Auckland created Te Toka o Apihai Te Kawau, a memorial commemorating the founding of Auckland that includes a rock which marks the spot where Rerenga Ora Iti met the water, and where the city began.

Port of Tauranga

PortMetroportPort of Tauranga Limited
In 2007, with a big increase in shipping traffic being projected (due to the Maersk shipping line choosing Auckland as a hub for the Fonterra export traffic), POAL considered a merger with Port of Tauranga, which did not come to pass.
Several times in the late 2000s, Port of Tauranga proposed to buy or merge with its rival Ports of Auckland (POAL).

Marina

marinasboat harbourYacht Harbor
As the company operates all of the associated facilities in the Greater Auckland area (excluding the ferry terminals and local marinas for recreational yachting), this article is about both the current company and the ports of Auckland themselves.

Yachting

yachtsmanyachtsmensailing
As the company operates all of the associated facilities in the Greater Auckland area (excluding the ferry terminals and local marinas for recreational yachting), this article is about both the current company and the ports of Auckland themselves.

Land reclamation

reclaimed landreclaimedreclamation
The 55 hectare of wharves and storage areas (mostly for containers, cars and other large shipments) are almost exclusively situated on reclaimed land, mostly in the former Commercial Bay, Official Bay and in Mechanics Bay.

Commercial Bay

Smale's Point
The 55 hectare of wharves and storage areas (mostly for containers, cars and other large shipments) are almost exclusively situated on reclaimed land, mostly in the former Commercial Bay, Official Bay and in Mechanics Bay.

ZPMC (company)

ZPMCZhenhuaShanghai Zhenhua Heavy Industries
Three new large container cranes arrived in 2018 from Chinese firm Zhenhua Port Machinery Co. for NZ$20 million each, now installed at the North end of Fergusson Container Terminal.

Panamax

Post-PanamaxNew PanamaxNeo-Panamax
They were bought to provide the necessary lifting capacity and reach for Post-Panamax ships.