Portuguese India

PortugueseIndiaPortuguese GoaGoaPortuguese State of IndiaEstado da IndiaPortuguese ruleEstado da ÍndiaEstado da Índia PortuguesaPortuguese colonies in India
The State of India (Estado da Índia), also referred as the Portuguese State of India (Estado Português da Índia, EPI) or simply Portuguese India (Índia Portuguesa), was a state of the Portuguese Empire, founded six years after the discovery of a sea route between Portugal and the Indian Subcontinent to serve as the governing body of a string of Portuguese fortresses and colonies overseas.wikipedia
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Goa

Goa, IndiaState of GoaGoa (India)
(Subsequent Portuguese governors were not always of viceroy rank.) After 1510, the capital of the Portuguese viceroyalty was transferred to Goa. At the time of the British Indian Empire's dissolution in 1947, Portuguese India was subdivided into three districts located on modern-day India's western coast, sometimes referred to collectively as Goa: namely Goa; Damão, which included the inland enclaves of Dadra and Nagar Haveli; and Diu.
The Portuguese overseas territory of Portuguese India existed for about 450 years until it was annexed by India in 1961.

Francisco de Almeida

Dom Francisco de AlmeidaAlmeidaBororó
The first viceroy, Francisco de Almeida, established his headquarters in Cochin (Cochim, Kochi). The Zamorin prepared a large fleet of 200 ships to oppose the Portuguese, but in March 1506 Lourenço de Almeida (son of Francisco de Almeida) was victorious in a sea battle at the entrance to the harbour of Cannanore, the Battle of Cannanore, an important setback for the fleet of the Zamorin.
In 1505 he was appointed as the first governor and viceroy of the Portuguese State of India (Estado da Índia).

Portuguese Empire

PortuguesePortugalPortuguese colonies
(Subsequent Portuguese governors were not always of viceroy rank.) After 1510, the capital of the Portuguese viceroyalty was transferred to Goa.
By then, the colonial possessions had been reduced to forts and plantations along the African coastline (expanded inland during the Scramble for Africa in the late 19th century), Portuguese Timor, and enclaves in India (Portuguese India) and China (Portuguese Macau).

List of states of the Portuguese Empire

State of the Portuguese Empirestates of the Portuguese Empirecolonial administrator
The State of India (Estado da Índia), also referred as the Portuguese State of India (Estado Português da Índia, EPI) or simply Portuguese India (Índia Portuguesa), was a state of the Portuguese Empire, founded six years after the discovery of a sea route between Portugal and the Indian Subcontinent to serve as the governing body of a string of Portuguese fortresses and colonies overseas.

Portugal

PortuguesePortuguese RepublicPOR
The State of India (Estado da Índia), also referred as the Portuguese State of India (Estado Português da Índia, EPI) or simply Portuguese India (Índia Portuguesa), was a state of the Portuguese Empire, founded six years after the discovery of a sea route between Portugal and the Indian Subcontinent to serve as the governing body of a string of Portuguese fortresses and colonies overseas.
In addition, Portugal still ruled the Asian territories of Portuguese India, Portuguese Timor and Portuguese Macau.

Dadra and Nagar Haveli

Dadra & Nagar HaveliDadra Nagar HaveliDadra
At the time of the British Indian Empire's dissolution in 1947, Portuguese India was subdivided into three districts located on modern-day India's western coast, sometimes referred to collectively as Goa: namely Goa; Damão, which included the inland enclaves of Dadra and Nagar Haveli; and Diu.
After India attained Independence in 1947, the residents of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, with the help of volunteers of organisations like the United Front of Goans (UFG), the National Movement Liberation Organisation (NMLO), and the Azad Gomantak Dal, conquered the territories of Dadra and Nagar Haveli from Portuguese India in 1954.

Diu district

Diu
At the time of the British Indian Empire's dissolution in 1947, Portuguese India was subdivided into three districts located on modern-day India's western coast, sometimes referred to collectively as Goa: namely Goa; Damão, which included the inland enclaves of Dadra and Nagar Haveli; and Diu.
Mirroring the system of administrative division in Portugal, Diu district (Distrito de Diu) was established as an administrative division of the Portuguese State of India (Estado da Índia) in the first half of the 19th century.

Fort Anjediva

Anjediva FortAnjedivaAnjidiv Fort
On 13 September, Francisco de Almeida reached Anjadip Island, where he immediately started the construction of Fort Anjediva.
Though the fort has a rich history linked to rule in Portuguese India, the fort is presently in ruins.

Chaul

ChaoulCheul
In March 1508 a Portuguese squadron under command of Lourenço de Almeida was attacked by a combined Mameluk Egyptian and Gujarat Sultanate fleet at Chaul and Dabul respectively, led by admirals Mirocem and Meliqueaz in the Battle of Chaul.
Chaul is a former city of Portuguese India, now in ruins.

Afonso de Albuquerque

AlbuquerqueAlfonso de Albuquerquede Albuquerque
Afonso de Albuquerque's squadron had, however, split from that of Cunha off East Africa and was independently conquering territories in the Persian Gulf to the west.
During the last five years of his life, he turned to administration, where his actions as the second governor of Portuguese India were crucial to the longevity of the Portuguese Empire.

Vijayanagara Empire

Vijayanagar EmpireVijayanagarVijayanagara
The Portuguese built the Pulicat fort in 1502, with the help of the Vijayanagar ruler. In 1510, Afonso de Albuquerque defeated the Bijapur sultans with the help of Timayya, on behalf of the Hindu Vijayanagara Empire, leading to the establishment of a permanent settlement in Velha Goa (or Old Goa).
The Vijayanagara Empire (also called Karnata Empire, and the Kingdom of Bisnegar by the Portuguese) was based in the Deccan Plateau region in South India.

Lourenço de Almeida

Lorenz de AlmeydaLourenço d'Almeida
He decided to send his son Lourenço de Almeida with 6 ships, who destroyed 27 Calicut vessels in the harbour of Quilon. The Zamorin prepared a large fleet of 200 ships to oppose the Portuguese, but in March 1506 Lourenço de Almeida (son of Francisco de Almeida) was victorious in a sea battle at the entrance to the harbour of Cannanore, the Battle of Cannanore, an important setback for the fleet of the Zamorin.
He was born in Martim, Kingdom of Portugal, the son of Francisco de Almeida, first viceroy of Portuguese India.

List of governors of Portuguese India

Governor of Portuguese IndiaViceroy of Portuguese IndiaViceroy of India
(Subsequent Portuguese governors were not always of viceroy rank.) After 1510, the capital of the Portuguese viceroyalty was transferred to Goa.
The government of Portuguese India started in 1505, six years after the discovery of the sea route to India by Vasco da Gama, with the nomination of the first Viceroy Francisco de Almeida, then settled at Kochi.

Portuguese conquest of Goa

Goaconquest of Goacapture of Goa
In 1510, Afonso de Albuquerque defeated the Bijapur sultans with the help of Timayya, on behalf of the Hindu Vijayanagara Empire, leading to the establishment of a permanent settlement in Velha Goa (or Old Goa).
On November 4, 1509, Afonso de Albuquerque succeeded Dom Francisco de Almeida as Governor of the Portuguese State of India, after the arrival in India of the Marshal of Portugal Dom Fernando Coutinho, sent by King Manuel to enforce the orderly succession of Albuquerque to office.

Tristão da Cunha

da Cunha, TristãoTristao da Cunha
In 1507 Almeida's mission was strengthened by the arrival of Tristão da Cunha's squadron.
He was nominated as first viceroy of Portuguese India in 1504, but could not take up this post owing to temporary blindness.

St. Angelo Fort

Kannur FortFort Sant' AngeloSt. Angelo's Fort
On 23 October, with the permission of the friendly ruler of Cannanore, he started building St. Angelo Fort at Cannanore, leaving Lourenço de Brito in charge with 150 men and two ships.
In 1498, during Vasco da Gama's visit to India, the local Kolathiri king granted the land to Portuguese to build a settlement in present-day Kerala.

Fort Kochi

Fort CochinFort ManuelFort Manuel on Cochin
He strengthened the Portuguese fortifications of Fort Manuel on Cochin.
The territory that would be later known as Fort Kochi was granted to the Portuguese in 1503 by the Rajah of Kochi, after the forces of Afonso de Albuquerque helped him fighting the forces of Saamoothiri of Kozhikode.

Mangalore

MangaluruMangalore cityManglore
Mangalore was named the islands of O Padrão de Santa Maria; later came to be known as St. Mary's Islands.
This coastal city was ruled by several major powers, including the Kadambas, Alupas, Vijayanagar Empire, Keladi Nayaks and the Portuguese.

Chimaji Appa

Chimnaji AppaChimajiChimnáji Ápa
Most of the Northern Province was lost to the Marathas of the Maratha Empire in 1739 when the Maratha General Chimnaji Appa defeated the Portuguese.
He was an able military commander who liberated the western coast of India from Portuguese rule.

Órfãs d'El-Rei

Órfãs do ReiOrfãs d'El-Rei
The Portuguese also shipped over many Órfãs d'El-Rei to Portuguese colonies in the Indian peninsula, Goa in particular.
Since these girls were specifically designated as the "King's", the Portuguese government paid for their care and upbringing before and after they were sent to Portuguese India.

Transportes Aéreos da Índia Portuguesa

Portuguese India AirlinesTAIP (''Transportes Aéreos da Índia Portuguesa'')TAIP (Portuguese India Airlines)
To facilitate the transport of people and goods to and from the Indian enclaves, the Portuguese established an airline, Transportes Aéreos da Índia Portuguesa, and airports at Goa, Daman and Diu.
Transportes Aéreos da Índia Portuguesa (Air Transport of Portuguese India) or TAIP was an airline which operated from Portuguese India from 1955 to 1961.

Gujarat

Gujarat StateGujarat, IndiaGujrat
The Portuguese acquired several territories from the Sultans of Gujarat: Daman (occupied 1531, formally ceded 1539); Salsette, Bombay, and Baçaim (occupied 1534); and Diu (ceded 1535).
These enclaves were administered by Portuguese India under a single union territory for over 450 years, only to be later incorporated into the Republic of India on 19 December 1961 by military conquest.

Estado Novo (Portugal)

Estado NovoPortugalEstado Novo regime
In spite of this, Portugal only recognised Indian control in 1975, after the Carnation Revolution and the fall of the Estado Novo regime.
As a result, the Portuguese army and navy were involved in armed conflict in its colony of Portuguese India against the Indian Armed Forces.

Vasco da Gama

Vasco de GamaIsabel SodréCaravel ''Bérrio
The first Portuguese encounter with the subcontinent was on 20 May 1498 when Vasco da Gama reached Calicut on Malabar Coast.

Battle of Cannanore

Battle of Cannanore (1506)
The Zamorin prepared a large fleet of 200 ships to oppose the Portuguese, but in March 1506 Lourenço de Almeida (son of Francisco de Almeida) was victorious in a sea battle at the entrance to the harbour of Cannanore, the Battle of Cannanore, an important setback for the fleet of the Zamorin.
* Portuguese India