Portuguese cuisine

PortuguesePortugalPortuguese dishesPortuguese restaurantcuisinePortuguese dessertsPortuguese dishPortuguese foodCuisine of Portugallocal cuisine
Despite being relatively restricted to an Atlantic sustenance, Portuguese cuisine has many Mediterranean influences.wikipedia
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Chorizo

chouriçoGoan chouriçochorizos
Chunks of chouriço (a spicy Portuguese sausage) are often added as well, but may be omitted, thereby making the soup fully vegan. An extensive lavish cozido may include beef, pork, salt pork, several types of enchidos (such as cured chouriço, morcela e chouriço de sangue, linguiça, farinheira, etc.), pig's feet, cured ham, potatoes, carrots, turnips, chickpeas, cabbage and rice.
Spanish chorizo and Portuguese chouriço get their distinctive smokiness and deep red color from dried, smoked, red peppers (pimentón/pimentão).

Caldo verde

A common Portuguese soup is caldo verde, which consists of a base of cooked, then pureed, potato, onion and garlic, to which shredded collard greens are then added.
Caldo verde (, Portuguese for "green broth") is a popular soup in Portuguese cuisine.

Fishing in Portugal

fishingFisheriesfishing industry
Portugal is a seafaring nation with a well-developed fishing industry and this is reflected in the amount of fish and seafood eaten.
Portuguese cuisine includes a variety of fish and other seafood-based dishes, some of them renowned internationally.

Caldeirada

Portuguese fish stewZarzuela de mariscos
Caldeirada is a stew consisting of a variety of fish and shellfish with potatoes, tomatoes and onions.
Caldeirada is a Portuguese and Galician (Northwestern Spain region) fish stew consisting of a wide variety of fish and potatoes, along with other ingredients A fishermen's stew, the dish has been described as "a fish muddle that varies from town to town and depends on what the fishermen have managed to catch."

Soup

soupscanned soupcondensed soup
There are three main courses, with lunch and dinner usually including a soup.

Cozido à portuguesa

à portuguesa
A common Portuguese dish, mainly eaten in winter, is cozido à portuguesa, which somewhat parallels the French pot-au-feu or the New England boiled dinner.
Numerous regional variations exist throughout Portugal, and the dish is considered part of the Portuguese heritage, as well as one of the national dishes of Portugal.

Presunto

cured hamPresunto de BarrancosPresunto de Barroso
An extensive lavish cozido may include beef, pork, salt pork, several types of enchidos (such as cured chouriço, morcela e chouriço de sangue, linguiça, farinheira, etc.), pig's feet, cured ham, potatoes, carrots, turnips, chickpeas, cabbage and rice.
Presunto is dry-cured ham from Portugal, similar to Spanish jamón or Italian prosciutto crudo.

Tripe

beef tripetripestrippa
Tripas à moda do Porto (tripe with white beans) is said to have originated in the 14th century, when the Castilians laid siege to Lisbon and blockaded the Tagus entrance.

Cabidela

pato de cabidela
After chickens are killed, they may be hung up upside down, so the blood may be drained, however, paradoxically, it can be used later for cabidela.
Cabidela or arroz de cabidela (cabidela rice) is a Portuguese dish made with poultry or rabbit cooked in its own blood added to water and a bit of vinegar much like "jugged" or "civet" dishes.

Bacalhau

Terra Nova dos Bacalhausbacalaobacalhau (salgado)
Among fish recipes, salted cod (bacalhau) dishes are pervasive.
Thus, bacalhau became a staple of the Portuguese cuisine, nicknamed fiel amigo (loyal friend).

Alentejo

AlemtejoAlentejo RegionAlentejan
In fact, Portugal is the only European country to use coriander as a fresh herb, in food and salads, and it makes an indispensable ingredient in Açorda, a type of bread porridge, vastely appreciated in the Alentejo region. Carne de porco à alentejana, fried pork with clams, is a popular dish with a misleading name as it originated in the Algarve, not in Alentejo.

Requeijão

requesónRequesoncheese spread
The most famous are queijo da serra from the region of Serra da Estrela, Queijo São Jorge from the Portuguese island of São Jorge, and Requeijão.

Carne de porco à alentejana

Carne de porco à alentejana, fried pork with clams, is a popular dish with a misleading name as it originated in the Algarve, not in Alentejo.
Carne de Porco à Alentejana (Pork with clams) is one of the most traditional and popular pork dishes of Portuguese cuisine.

Licor Beirão

Beirão
Typical liqueurs, such as Licor Beirão and Ginjinha, are very popular alcoholic beverages in Portugal.
Licor Beirão is a Portuguese liqueur with 22% ABV.

Algarve

Algarve regionAlgarvesThe Algarve
Carne de porco à alentejana, fried pork with clams, is a popular dish with a misleading name as it originated in the Algarve, not in Alentejo. Tuna used to be plentiful in the waters of the Algarve.
Tourist attractions in the region include its beaches, Mediterranean climate, safety, cuisine, and relatively low prices.

Lamprey

lampreysPetromyzontiformesammocoetes
Other popular seafoods includes fresh sardines (especially as sardinhas assadas), octopus, squid, cuttlefish, crabs, shrimp and prawns, lobster, spiny lobster, and many other crustaceans, such as barnacles, hake, horse mackerel (scad), lamprey, sea bass, scabbard (especially in Madeira), and a great variety of other fish and shellfish, as well as molluscs, such as clams, mussels, oysters, periwinkles, and scallops.
"Arroz de lampreia" or lamprey rice is one of the most important dishes in Portuguese cuisine.

Espetada

Espetadas
Espetada (meat on a skewer) is very popular in Madeira.
Espetada is a traditional dish in Portuguese cuisine.

Fried egg

fried eggsfriedsunny-side up
To add a few more calories to this dish, an egg, sunny-side up, may be placed on top of the meat, in which case the dish acquires a new name, bife com ovo a cavalo (steak with an egg on horseback).
In Portugal and Brazil, a runny egg placed over a steak with a side dish of rice and black beans is called a bife a cavalo, literally "horse-riding steak".

Curry

curriescurriedBhuna
Other Portuguese influences can be tasted in the Chinese territory of Macau (Macanese cuisine) and in the Indian province of Goa, where Goan dishes, such as vindalho (a spicy curry), show the pairing of vinegar and garlic.
Kaṟi is described in a mid-17th century Portuguese cookbook by members of the British East India Company, who were trading with Tamil merchants along the Coromandel Coast of southeast India, becoming known as a "spice blend ... called kari podi or curry powder".

Goan cuisine

GoancuisineCuisine of Goa
Other Portuguese influences can be tasted in the Chinese territory of Macau (Macanese cuisine) and in the Indian province of Goa, where Goan dishes, such as vindalho (a spicy curry), show the pairing of vinegar and garlic.
Many Catholic dishes are either similar to or variants of their Portuguese counterparts in both naming or their use of ingredients.

Fios de ovos

Foi thongangel hairjala emas
Other common ingredients in Portuguese convent confectionery are almonds, doce de chila/gila (made from squash), wafer paper, and candied egg threads called fios de ovos.
They are a traditional element in Portuguese and Brazilian cuisine, both in desserts and as side dishes.

Porto

OportoPorto, Portugalnortherners
Tripas à moda do Porto (tripe with white beans) is said to have originated in the 14th century, when the Castilians laid siege to Lisbon and blockaded the Tagus entrance.
Porto is home to a number of dishes from traditional Portuguese cuisine.

Macanese cuisine

MacaneseMacauMacau cuisine
Other Portuguese influences can be tasted in the Chinese territory of Macau (Macanese cuisine) and in the Indian province of Goa, where Goan dishes, such as vindalho (a spicy curry), show the pairing of vinegar and garlic.
Macanese cuisine is unique to Macau, and consists of a blend of southern Chinese (especially Cantonese) and Portuguese cuisines, with significant influences from Southeast Asia and the Lusophone world.

Sardines as food

sardinescanned sardinessardine
Other popular seafoods includes fresh sardines (especially as sardinhas assadas), octopus, squid, cuttlefish, crabs, shrimp and prawns, lobster, spiny lobster, and many other crustaceans, such as barnacles, hake, horse mackerel (scad), lamprey, sea bass, scabbard (especially in Madeira), and a great variety of other fish and shellfish, as well as molluscs, such as clams, mussels, oysters, periwinkles, and scallops.
Sardines play an important role in Portuguese cuisine and culture.

Tripas

Tripas à Moda do Porto
Tripas à moda do Porto (tripe with white beans) is said to have originated in the 14th century, when the Castilians laid siege to Lisbon and blockaded the Tagus entrance.
Tripas in Portuguese cuisine is beef stomach, and in the form of Tripas à moda do Porto (tripe with white beans) is considered the traditional dish of the city of Porto, whose inhabitants are informally known as tripeiros.