Portuguese language

Spoken area of Galician-Portuguese (also known as Old Portuguese or Medieval Galician) in the kingdoms of Galicia and León around the 10th century, before the separation of Galician and Portuguese.
Sign in Japanese, Portuguese, and English in Oizumi, Japan, which has a large lusophone community due to return immigration of Japanese Brazilians.
Countries and regions where Portuguese has official status.
Multilingual signage in Chinese, Portuguese and English at the Hong Kong–Zhuhai–Macau Bridge port building in Macau. Portuguese is a co-official language in Macau.
Ethnically diverse East Timor has Portuguese as one of its official languages.
Statue of the Portuguese Poet Luís de Camões at the entrence of the Real Gabinete Português de Leitura in Rio de Janeiro.
Museum of the Portuguese Language in São Paulo.
Portugal's Portuguese Dialects.
Percentage of worldwide Portuguese speakers per country.
In Brasília, the Senate committee room during a meeting of the Education, Culture and Sport Committee in 2014. The committee holds a public hearing to discuss the Orthographic Agreement for the Portuguese Language, signed in 1990 and implemented in January 2016. The new rules must apply for the eight countries that have Portuguese as an official language, including Brazil, Portugal, etc.
Linguistic map of Pre-Roman Iberia.
Library of the Real Gabinete Português de Leitura in Rio de Janeiro.
A sign at Goa Central Library, in Panaji, India, listing three Portuguese-language newspapers
Map showing the historical retreat and expansion of Portuguese (Galician-Portuguese) within the context of its linguistic neighbors between the year 1000 and 2000.
Map showing mostly contemporary West Iberian and Occitano-Romance languages, as well many of their mainland European dialects (areas colored green, gold or pink/purple represent languages deemed endangered by UNESCO, so this may be outdated in less than a few decades). It shows European Portuguese, Galician, Eonavian, Mirandese and the Fala as not only closely related but as dialect continuum, though it excludes dialects spoken in insular Portugal (Azores and Madeira–Canaries is not shown either).
An Old Portuguese Memento mori memorial sign in Malacca City.
Participating countries of the Lusophony Games.
Chart of monophthongs of the Portuguese of Lisbon, with its in central schwa position.
Museum of the Portuguese Language in São Paulo.
Real Gabinete Português de Leitura in Recife.
The main post office building of Macau
The Bissau-Guinean Presidential Palace, with its Portuguese colonial architecture, is a building that has a library, a small theater and was formerly the palace of the colonial governor of Portuguese-Guinea, seen from the PAIGC-building (formerly the seat of the local commercial association Associação Comercial, Industrial e Agrícola de Bissau), located at the Praça dos Heróis Nacionais square (formerly Praça do Império square), in downtown Bissau.
The Natural History Museum of Mozambique (Manueline) in Maputo.
The Fundação Oriente of Fontainhas, India. The Fundação Oriente, along with Instituto Camões, Instituto Menezes Bragança among others, are institutions dedicated to the worldwide promotion of the Portuguese language and culture.
The International Portuguese Language Institute headquarters, in Praia.

Western Romance language of the Indo-European language family, originating in the Iberian Peninsula of Europe.

- Portuguese language
Spoken area of Galician-Portuguese (also known as Old Portuguese or Medieval Galician) in the kingdoms of Galicia and León around the 10th century, before the separation of Galician and Portuguese.

162 related topics

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Galicia (Spain)

Autonomous community of Spain and historic nationality under Spanish law.

Autonomous community of Spain and historic nationality under Spanish law.

A satellite view of Galicia
Bronze Age gold helmet from Leiro, Rianxo
Palloza houses in eastern Galicia, an evolved form of the Iron Age local roundhouses
Castro de Baroña, an Iron Age fortified settlement
A local Iron Age head warrior from Rubiás, Bande. Now in Museo Provincial de Ourense.
Miro, king of Galicia, and Martin of Braga, from an 1145 manuscript of Martin's Formula Vitae Honestae, now in the Austrian National Library. The original work was dedicated to King Miro with the header "To King Miro, the most glorious and calm, the pious, famous for his Catholic faith"
Partial view of the Romanesque interior of the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela
An illustration of the Cantigas de Santa Maria (13th century)
Gothic painting at Vilar de Donas' church, Palas de Rei
Tomb of the knight Sueiro Gómez de Soutomaior
Map of the Kingdom of Galicia, 1603
Maria Pita, heroine of the defense of A Coruña during the English siege of 1589
Battle of Vigo Bay, 23 October 1702
Battle of Corunna on 16 January 1809
Re-enactment of the Battle of Corunna
Pro–devolved-government poster, 1936
Memorial to the mayor and other republicans, including a syndicalist and a journal director, executed in Verín, 17 June 1937
Estreleira, Galician nationalist flag
As Catedrais beach in Ribadeo
Cliffs of Vixía Herbeira near Cape Ortegal, the highest (613 m) in continental Europe
Meadows in Pambre, Palas de Rei
The ria of Ferrol is an important naval base of Spain
'Tres Bispos' peak, Cervantes, Lugo
Riparian forest on the banks of the Eume
The River Sil and its canyon
Galician Blond cows
Iberian wolf, Galicia
Pacios, Courel, Lugo
Rías Baixas, Pontevedra
Pazo de Raxoi, in Santiago de Compostela, seat of the presidency of the local devolved government
Parliament of Galicia
Municipalities and parishes of Galicia
Zara (Inditex) in Dundee, Scotland
Electric cars are made in the Citroën French factory in Vigo.
An Aer Lingus plane in the Santiago de Compostela Airport.
A cruise ship in the seaport of A Coruña.
Population density
One of the oldest legal documents written in Galician, the Foro do bo burgo do Castro Caldelas
Santiago de Compostela Cathedral, seat of the Archbishop of Santiago of Compostela, and third most important centre of pilgrimage in Christianity.
Romanesque façade in the Cathedral of Ourense (1160); founded in the 6th century, its construction is attributed to King Chararic.
The castle of Pambre, Palas de Rei, which resisted the Irmandiños troops
Polbo á feira
Galician wines
Galician pipers
Galician representation at the Lorient Interceltic Festival
Rosalía de Castro.
Entroido: Peliqueiros in Laza, allegedly dressed as 16th-century Castilian tax collectors
A reenactor dressed as a Roman soldier. Festa do esquecemento, Xinzo de Limia
Coat of arms of the Kingdom of Galicia (L'armorial Le Blancq, c. 1560 AD).
A Coruña
Lugo
Ourense
Pontevedra
A Coruña
Lugo
Ourense
Pontevedra
Santiago de Compostela
Vigo
Ferrol
Anta (dolmen) at Axeitos, Ribeira. Hundreds of megaliths are still preserved in Galicia
Fisterra or Cape Finisterre, meaning 'Land's End', one of the westernmost points in continental Europe
Tower of Hercules, a Roman lighthouse and a World Heritage monument, A Coruña
Gates of the Iron Age oppidum of San Cibrao de Las, one of the largest castros of Galicia
Gaiteiros, or bagpipe players. Gaita ('bagpipe') is the most representative Galician musical instrument
Queimada, a traditional drink obtained after partially burning local augardente (grappa)
A hórreo or cabaceiro or canastro, a traditional and ubiquitous granary
A cruceiro, or wayside cross, and San Xurxo church in A Coruña
Millenarian rock carvings, Laxe dos carballos at Campo Lameiro, in this detail depicts a deer hit by several spears
Leña square, Pontevedra
Castle and Monastery of San Vicente do Pino, Monforte de Lemos
Roman Walls of Lugo, a World Heritage monument
A traditional dorna, a fisherman boat common in the Ria de Arousa
The rocky coast of Cabo Silleiro, Baiona

Two languages are official and widely used today in Galicia: the native Galician, a Romance language closely related to Portuguese with which it shares the Galician-Portuguese medieval literature; and Spanish, usually called Castilian.

Chart of Romance languages based on structural and comparative criteria (not on socio-functional ones).

Sardinian language

Romance language spoken by the Sardinians on the Western Mediterranean island of Sardinia.

Romance language spoken by the Sardinians on the Western Mediterranean island of Sardinia.

Chart of Romance languages based on structural and comparative criteria (not on socio-functional ones).
Hunter, Nuragic bronze statuette
Location of the Sardinian tribes, as described by the Roman sources.
Length of the Roman rule and emergence of the Romance languages.
The condaghe of Saint Peter of Silki (1065–1180), written in Sardinian.
The first page of the Arborean Carta de Logu
Sardinian-language statutes of Sassari from the 13th–14th centuries
Three gravestones dating to the second half of the 19th century in the historic cemetery of Ploaghe (Logudoro), wherein a total of 39 gravestones have writings in Sardinian and 3 in Italian; a process of language shift may be observed therefrom, starting inter alia from the displayed usage of Italian given names, rather than the local Sardinian ones.
The Kingdom of Sardinia in 1856.
A bilingual sign in Villasor's town hall.
Bilingual No-smoking sign in Sardinian and Italian
Bilingual Italian–Sardinian road sign in Siniscola
Church of the Pater Noster (Jerusalem, Israel), Lord's Prayer plaque in Sardinian
The Sardinian-speaking community among the other minority language groups officially recognized by Italy.
Bilingual road signs in Pula.
The word for "peace" in all the varieties of Sardinian.
Corso-Sardinian (orange and yellow) with regard to Sardinian proper (green).

A 1949 study by the Italian-American linguist Mario Pei, analyzing the degree of difference from a language's parent (Latin, in the case of Romance languages) by comparing phonology, inflection, syntax, vocabulary, and intonation, indicated the following percentages (the higher the percentage, the greater the distance from Latin): Sardinian 8%, Italian 12%, Spanish 20%, Romanian 23.5%, Occitan 25%, Portuguese 31%, and French 44%.

X-rays of Daniel Jones'.

Vowel

Syllabic speech sound pronounced without any stricture in the vocal tract.

Syllabic speech sound pronounced without any stricture in the vocal tract.

X-rays of Daniel Jones'.
The original vowel quadrilateral, from Jones' articulation. The vowel trapezoid of the modern IPA, and at the top of this article, is a simplified rendition of this diagram. The bullets are the cardinal vowel points. (A parallel diagram covers the front and central rounded and back unrounded vowels.) The cells indicate the ranges of articulation that could reasonably be transcribed with those cardinal vowel letters,, and non-cardinal . If a language distinguishes fewer than these vowel qualities, could be merged to, to ,  to , etc. If a language distinguishes more,  could be added where the ranges of  intersect,  where  intersect, and  where  intersect.
Idealistic tongue positions of cardinal front vowels with highest point indicated.
Front, raised and retracted are the three articulatory dimensions of vowel space. Open and close refer to the jaw, not the tongue.
Spectrogram of vowels . is a low vowel, so its F1 value is higher than that of and, which are high vowels.  is a front vowel, so its F2 is substantially higher than that of  and, which are back vowels.

Polish and Portuguese also contrast nasal and oral vowels.

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Asturleonese language

Romance language spoken primarily in northwestern Spain, namely in the historical regions and Spain's modern-day autonomous communities of Asturias, northwestern Castile and León and Cantabria, and also in a small neighbouring area of Portugal.

Romance language spoken primarily in northwestern Spain, namely in the historical regions and Spain's modern-day autonomous communities of Asturias, northwestern Castile and León and Cantabria, and also in a small neighbouring area of Portugal.

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Usage of Asturleonese today

In Portugal, the related Mirandese dialect is recognized by the Assembly of the Republic as a co-official language along with Portuguese for local matters, and it is taught in public schools in the few areas where Mirandese is natively spoken.

The Rencong alphabet, a native writing system found in central and South Sumatra. The text reads (Voorhoeve's spelling): "haku manangis ma / njaru ka'u ka'u di / saru tijada da / tang [hitu hadik sa]", which is translated by Voorhoeve as: "I am weeping, calling you; though called, you do not come" (hitu adik sa- is the rest of 4th line.

Malay language

Austronesian language officially spoken in Indonesia, Brunei, Malaysia and Singapore and unofficially spoken in East Timor and parts of Thailand.

Austronesian language officially spoken in Indonesia, Brunei, Malaysia and Singapore and unofficially spoken in East Timor and parts of Thailand.

The Rencong alphabet, a native writing system found in central and South Sumatra. The text reads (Voorhoeve's spelling): "haku manangis ma / njaru ka'u ka'u di / saru tijada da / tang [hitu hadik sa]", which is translated by Voorhoeve as: "I am weeping, calling you; though called, you do not come" (hitu adik sa- is the rest of 4th line.
Kedukan Bukit Inscription, using Pallava alphabet, is the oldest surviving specimen of the Old Malay language in South Sumatra, Indonesia.
A Malay traffic sign in Malaysia.
Malay road signs in Jakarta, Indonesia. The blue sign reads "Lajur Khusus Menurunkan Penumpang" which means "Lane for dropping passengers only" and the small no-parking sign on the left reads "Sampai Rambu Berikutnya" which means "until next sign" in Indonesian
Jakartan Creole Malay (Betawi language)

In East Timor, Indonesian is recognised by the constitution as one of two working languages (the other being English), alongside the official languages of Tetum and Portuguese.

Timeline of the Roman conquest of Hispania (220 BC–19 BC), with Roman provincial boundaries shown

Hispania

Timeline of the Roman conquest of Hispania (220 BC–19 BC), with Roman provincial boundaries shown
Linguistic map: This shows the Linguistic variation of the Iberian Peninsula at about 200 BC (at the end of the Second Punic War).
Carthaginian influence sphere before the First Punic War.
Hispania under Caesar Augustus's rule after the Cantabrian Wars in 29 BC
Roman Hispania in 125
Provinces of Hispania under the Tetrarchy
Iberian Peninsula (AD 530–AD 570)
The Iberian Peninsula in the year 560 AD
Umayyad Hispania at its greatest extent 719 AD

Hispania (nearly identically pronounced in Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, and Italian for "Spain") was the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula and its provinces.

South America

Continent entirely in the Western Hemisphere and mostly in the Southern Hemisphere, with a relatively small portion in the Northern Hemisphere.

Continent entirely in the Western Hemisphere and mostly in the Southern Hemisphere, with a relatively small portion in the Northern Hemisphere.

Map of South America showing physical, political, and population characteristics, as per 2018
A composite relief image of South America
Modern political map of South America
Los Roques Archipelago, Venezuela
Köppen-Geiger climate classification map for South America
Map of all tropical cyclone tracks from 1945 to 2006
The prehistoric Cueva de las Manos, or "Cave of the Hands", in Argentina
The Inca estate of Machu Picchu, Peru is one of the New Seven Wonders of the World.
Woodcut depicting Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci's first voyage (1497-98) to the New World, from the first known published edition of Vespucci's 1504 letter to Piero Soderini.
The Inca–Spanish confrontation in the Battle of Cajamarca left thousands of natives dead.
The Portuguese explorer Pedro Álvares Cabral landing in Brazil in 1500
Dutch colonial houses in Paramaribo, Suriname
A painting of the settlement of Pernambuco in colonial Brazil by Frans Post
A map of the Spanish and Portuguese colonies in the Americas in 1790
Public flogging of a slave in 19th-century Brazil.
The proclamation of the Independence of Brazil by Prince Pedro on 7 September 1822
The Guayaquil conference between José de San Martín and Simón Bolívar
Coronation of Pedro I as 1st Emperor of Brazil
Bernardo O'Higgins swears officially the independence of Chile.
The Thirty-Three Orientals proclaimed the independence of Cisplatine Province.
Battle of Fanfa, battle scene in Southern Brazil during the Ragamuffin War
Imperial Brazilian Navy and army troops during the Siege of Paysandú, 1865
The Uruguayan Army at the Battle of Sauce, 1866
The Imperial Brazilian Army during a procession in Paraguay, 1868
The Chilean Army in the battlefield of the Battle of Chorrillos, 1883
A German submarine under attack by Brazilian Air Force PBY Catalina, 31 July 1943
Argentine soldiers during the Falklands War
The Brazilian Minas Geraes class kindled an Argentine–Brazilian–Chilean naval arms race.
Presidents of UNASUR member states at the Second Brasília Summit on 23 May 2008.
Headquarters of the UNASUR in Quito, Ecuador
Scheme for geographic regions and subregions used by the United Nations Statistics Division.
South American flags
Satellite view of South America at night from NASA.
Official languages in South America
Las Lajas Sanctuary, Ipiales, Colombia.
Spanish-Venezuelan protesters in Madrid.
A Japanese-Brazilian Miko during a festival in Curitiba
Former president of Brazil Lula and members of the Italian Brazilian community during the Grape Festival at Caxias do Sul
Peruvian woman and her son
Launch at the Kourou Space Centre in French Guiana
Refinery of Brazilian state-owned Petrobras in Cochabamba, Bolivia
Chuquicamata is the largest open pit mine in the world, near the city of Calama in Chile.
KC-390 is the largest military transport aircraft produced in South America by the Brazilian company Embraer.
Vineyard in Luján de Cuyo, province of Mendoza, Argentina
Sugarcane plantation in São Paulo. In 2018, Brazil was the world's largest producer, with 746 million tonnes. South America produces half of the world's sugarcane.
Soy plantation in Mato Grosso. In 2020, Brazil was the world's largest producer, with 130 million tonnes. South America produces half of the world's soybeans.
Coffee in Minas Gerais. In 2018, Brazil was the world's largest producer, with 3.5 million tonnes. South America produces half of the world's coffee.
Orange in São Paulo. In 2018, Brazil was the world's largest producer, with 17 million tonnes. South America produces 25% of the world's orange.
Truck of a meat company in Brazil. South America produces 20% of the world's beef and chicken meat.
EMS, the largest Brazilian pharmaceutical industry
Braskem, the largest Brazilian chemical industry
Cerro Rico, Potosi, Bolivia, still a major silver mine
Amethyst mine in Ametista do Sul. South America is a major producer of gems such as amethyst, topaz, emerald, aquamarine and tourmaline
Iron mine in Minas Gerais. Brazil is the world's second largest iron ore exporter.
Bird (UOB Plaza, Singapore), sculpture of Colombian artist Fernando Botero
“Chromovegetal Maze” by Carlos Cruz Diez, in Caracas.
Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Panorama of the interior of the Maracanã stadium during the closing ceremony of the 2014 FIFA World Cup
Wind farm in the Paraguaná Peninsula, Venezuela
Wind power in Parnaíba.
Angra Nuclear Power Plant in Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro
Pirapora Solar Complex, the largest in Brazil and Latin America with a capacity of 321 MW.
Rodovia dos Bandeirantes, Brazil
Ruta 9 / 14, in Zarate, Argentina
Rio–Niterói Bridge
Rio de Janeiro International Airport
Port of Itajaí, Santa Catarina, Brazil
Stretch of the Pan-American Highway in Argentina
General Rafael Urdaneta Bridge in Venezuela
The Port of Callao in Lima
The La Paz cable car system in Bolivia is home to both the longest and highest urban cable car network in the world
Grape plantation in Argentina. Argentina and Chile are among the 10 largest grape and wine producers in the world and Brazil among the 20 largest.
Maize in Dourados. Brazil and Argentina are among the 5 largest world producers
Salmon farming in Chile. One third of all salmon sold in the world comes from the country.
Neugebauer Chocolate Factory in Arroio do Meio. South America specializes in food processing
Steel-maker CSN, in Volta Redonda. Brazil is one of the 10 largest steel producers in the world, and Argentina is one of the 30 largest
Klabin industrial complex, in Ortigueira. Brazil is the second largest pulp producer and the eighth largest paper producer in the world
Portico of the Democrata men's shoe factory, in Franca. Brazil is the fourth largest shoe manufacturer in the world.
Hering, in Santa Catarina, Brazil. The country has one of the 5 largest textile industries in the world
Mercedes-Benz plant in São Paulo. Brazil is among the 10 largest vehicle manufacturers in the world and Argentina among the 30 largest.
Copper mine in Chile. Latin America produces more than half of the world's copper
Colombian emerald. The country is the largest producer of emeralds in the world, and Brazil is one of the largest producers
Copacabana Palace, the best hotel in South America, in Rio de Janeiro. Tourism brings important currencies to the continent.
Honey production in Argentina. The country is the third largest producer of honey in the world.
Sunflower plantation in Argentina. The country is the world's third largest producer of sunflower seed.
Chilean cherries. Chile is one of the top 5 producers of sweet cherries in the world.
Chilean kiwi. The country is one of the 10 largest kiwi producers in the world.
Palm plantation in Magdalena. Colombia is one of the top 5 palm oil producers in the world.
Pineapple in Brazil. The country is the 3rd largest producer in the world. South America produces close to 20% of the world's pineapple.
Oil refinery in Amuay. Venezuela is one of the largest oil producers in the world.

Given a long history of colonialism, the overwhelming majority of South Americans speak Spanish or Portuguese, and societies and states are rich in Western traditions.

Linguistic map of southwestern Europe

Iberian Romance languages

Area consisting primarily of Spain, Portugal, Gibraltar, Andorra and southern France.

Area consisting primarily of Spain, Portugal, Gibraltar, Andorra and southern France.

Linguistic map of southwestern Europe
Ibero-Romance languages around the world

Evolved from the Vulgar Latin of Iberia, the most widely spoken Iberian Romance languages are Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan-Valencian-Balear, and Galician.

East Timor

Island country in Southeast Asia.

Island country in Southeast Asia.

A demonstration for independence from Indonesia held in Australia during September 1999
José Ramos-Horta, 1996 Nobel Peace Prize winner, second president of East Timor
Xanana Gusmão, the first East Timorese president after Indonesian occupation
The fourteen municipalities of East Timor
Demonstration against Australia in December 2013
Köppen climate classification map for East Timor
Nominal GDP of East Timor (previous and data)
Fractional coins, "centavos", used locally as part of the United States dollar
A proportional representation of East Timor exports, 2019
Population pyramid
Major language groups in East Timor by suco
Escola Portuguesa Ruy Cinatti, the Portuguese School of Díli
The Church of Santo António de Motael, Dili
Igreja da Imaculada Conceição church, in Viqueque
Sacred house (lee teinu) in Lospalos
Traditional Timorese dancers
Players of the Timorese club Sport Dili e Benfica

"Timor" is derived from timur, the word for "east" in Malay, which became recorded as Timor in Portuguese, thus resulting in the tautological toponym meaning "East East"; in Indonesian, Timor Timur.

South Africa

Southernmost country in Africa.

Southernmost country in Africa.

Migrations that formed the modern Rainbow nation
Mapungubwe Hill, the site of the former capital of the Kingdom of Mapungubwe
Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias planting the cross at Cape Point after being the first to successfully round the Cape of Good Hope.
Charles Davidson Bell's 19th-century painting of Jan van Riebeeck, who founded the first European settlement in South Africa, arrives in Table Bay in 1652
Depiction of a Zulu attack on a Boer camp in February 1838
The First Boer War was a rebellion of Boers against the British rule in the Transvaal that re-established their independence.
"For use by white persons" – apartheid sign in English and Afrikaans
FW de Klerk and Nelson Mandela shake hands in January 1992
The Central Plateau edged by the Great Escarpment, and the Cape Fold Belt
The thick line traces the Great Escarpment bordering the central plateau; the line's red portion is the Drakensberg. The Escarpment rises to its highest, over 3000 m, where it separates KwaZulu-Natal and Lesotho. No regions on the map have well-defined borders except where the Escarpment or a mountain range forms a clear dividing line
Drakensberg, the eastern and highest portion of the Great Escarpment which surrounds the east, south and western borders of the central plateau of Southern Africa
Spring flowers in Namaqualand
Köppen climate types of South Africa
South African giraffes, Kruger National Park
Subtropical forest near Durban
Lowveld vegetation of the Kruger National Park
Cape Floral Region Protected Areas
Union Buildings in Pretoria, seat of the executive
Houses of Parliament in Cape Town, seat of the legislature
Constitutional Court in Johannesburg
Soweto Pride 2012 participants protest against violence against lesbians. The country has strong human rights laws but some groups are still discriminated against. It is the first country in Africa to recognise same sex marriage
SANDF soldiers
Provinces of South Africa
Change in per capita GDP of South Africa, 1700–2018. Figures are inflation-adjusted to 2011 International dollars.
Annual per capita personal income by race group in South Africa relative to white levels
A proportional representation of South Africa exports, 2019
The Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) is the largest stock exchange on the African continent
Workers packing pears for export in the Ceres Valley, Western Cape
Mark Shuttleworth in space
Schoolchildren in Mitchell's Plain
Life expectancy in select Southern African countries, 1950–2019. HIV/AIDS has caused a fall in life expectancy.
Rock painting of an eland, Drakensberg
Olive Schreiner
A plate of freshly prepared Babotie, a meat-based meal which originated within South Africa.
Kagiso Rabada, South African cricketer
The Springboks in a bus parade after winning the 2007 Rugby World Cup

White South Africans may also speak European languages, including Italian, Portuguese (also spoken by black Angolans and Mozambicans), Dutch, German, and Greek, while some Indian South Africans speak Indian languages, such as Gujarati, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, and Urdu.