Post-presidency of George Washington

George Washington began his post-presidency, after two terms in the presidential office, on March 4, 1797.wikipedia
50 Related Articles

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
Throughout his retirement, Washington entertained local friends, former official associates, and strangers who wished to converse and see America's first president, the Revolutionary War hero, and founder of the nation. After the meal Washington showed his medals, prints of war battles by John Trumbell, and a key of the Bastille, a relic of the French Revolution, given him by Lafayette. When Washington began his presidency in April 1789, France had been a strong ally with the United States, while Louis XVI strongly supported, financially and militarily, American independence from England, during the American Revolutionary War.

Quasi-War

Quasi WarQuasi-War with Franceundeclared war
Washington followed closely the affairs of state, including the growing tension between France and the United States, that by the Spring of 1798, developed into a Quasi-War.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
President John Adams on July 2, 1798, appointed Washington Lieutenant General and Commander of America's newly augmented army. Washington attended his successors John Adams Presidential Inauguration on March 4, in Philadelphia, and read aloud his final brief "farewell address", eager to return to his beloved home of Mount Vernon, after serving two consecutive terms of office.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
Washington insisted that active command be vested in Alexander Hamilton, whom Adam's appointed Major General and Inspector of the Armies.

Martha Washington

MarthaMartha Dandridge CustisMartha Custis Washington
During the summer of 1799, Washington drafted a new will, that left most of his estate to his wife Martha, but unexpectedly, set free all the slaves which he owned outright, a legal order to be fulfilled after his wife's death.

Manumission

manumittedmanumitfreed
During the summer of 1799, Washington drafted a new will, that left most of his estate to his wife Martha, but unexpectedly, set free all the slaves which he owned outright, a legal order to be fulfilled after his wife's death.

Washington Monument

The Washington MonumentMonumentthe one in Washington, D.C.
The Washington Monument was completed in 1885.

Mount Rushmore

Mount Rushmore National MemorialMt. RushmoreMount Rushmore Memorial
Mount Rushmore, completed in 1941, has a gigantic Washington stone portrait sculpture, to honor his presidency.

Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington

The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washingtonpresidential library
In 2013, the Washington presidential library was completed and opened to the public.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
George Washington, the first President elected under the U.S. Constitution, was born on February 22, 1732, in the colony of Virginia.

Edward Braddock

General BraddockGeneral Edward BraddockBraddock
Washington served in the Virginia militia, was appointed Lieutenant Colonel, and was British General Edward Braddock's aide-de-camp during the French and Indian War.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
Washington served in the Virginia militia, was appointed Lieutenant Colonel, and was British General Edward Braddock's aide-de-camp during the French and Indian War.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
When Washington left office in 1797, the nation was divided into a two-party system, the Republicans and the Federalists, who controlled much of Congress.

Federalist Party

FederalistFederalistsF
When Washington left office in 1797, the nation was divided into a two-party system, the Republicans and the Federalists, who controlled much of Congress.

Mount Vernon

Mt. VernonMount Vernon PlantationMount Vernon Estate
Washington attended his successors John Adams Presidential Inauguration on March 4, in Philadelphia, and read aloud his final brief "farewell address", eager to return to his beloved home of Mount Vernon, after serving two consecutive terms of office.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
Although no one dared to challenge Washington for the Presidency, his reputation, during the second half of this second term in office, was under scrutiny of the anti-Federalist, Republican Party, founded earlier by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
Although no one dared to challenge Washington for the Presidency, his reputation, during the second half of this second term in office, was under scrutiny of the anti-Federalist, Republican Party, founded earlier by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.

Thomas Paine

Tom PainePainePaine, Thomas
On July 30, 1796, the Aurora, an anti-Federalist newspaper, published Thomas Pain's open letter to Washington.

Bastille

The BastilleBastille PrisonBastile
After the meal Washington showed his medals, prints of war battles by John Trumbell, and a key of the Bastille, a relic of the French Revolution, given him by Lafayette.

James Monroe

MonroePresident MonroePresident James Monroe
In March 1798, James Monroe, a Republican, and former American Minister to France appointed by Washington, in a published address, was critical of Washington's recall of Monroe from office, in an attempt to cover up his own insubordination.

Peter Carr (Virginia politician)

Peter CarrPeter
Washington had also been informed of a bizarre plot invented by Thomas Jefferson's nephew Peter Carr, a Republican agitator.

Alien and Sedition Acts

Sedition ActSedition Act of 1798Alien Enemies Act
Washington also full hardily endorsed John Adams Federalist Alien and Sedition Acts passed by Congress, to quell the incendiary Republicans.

XYZ Affair

failed diplomatic attemptsLucien HautevalM. Hauteval
Washington was also vindicated, in the aftermath of the French bribery scandal, the XYZ Affair.

Louis XVI of France

Louis XVIKing Louis XVIKing Louis XVI of France
When Washington began his presidency in April 1789, France had been a strong ally with the United States, while Louis XVI strongly supported, financially and militarily, American independence from England, during the American Revolutionary War.

French Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary FranceRevolutionary
Six days into his first term, the French Revolution plunged Europe into war, between France and England, while President Washington and his administration, chose to remain neutral.