Postal interception

interception of mail
Postal interception is the act of retrieving another person's mail for the purpose of ensuring that the mail is not delivered to the recipient, or to spy on them.wikipedia
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Surveillance

electronic surveillancestakeoutmonitoring
It can also include simple technical methods, such as human intelligence gathering and postal interception.

General Post Office

GPOPost OfficeGeneral Post Office (GPO)
In the United Kingdom, the Special Investigations Unit of the General Post Office was responsible for postal interception.
For some time a department called the GPO Special Investigations Unit was responsible for intercepting letters ("postal interception") as part of British intelligence service operations.

Mail

postal servicepostal servicespostal
Postal interception is the act of retrieving another person's mail for the purpose of ensuring that the mail is not delivered to the recipient, or to spy on them.

United States Postal Service

U.S. Postal ServiceU.S. Post OfficeUnited States Post Office
Since 2002, the United States Postal Service photographs the outside of all mail, retains those images for weeks or months, and provides them to police or other investigators upon a simple request.

COINTELPRO

Counter-Intelligence ProgramCOINTELCointelpro Program

Church Committee

Church CommissionUnited States Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence ActivitiesSenate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities

Signals intelligence in modern history

interceptedgeneral U.S. ruleSIGINT in Modern History
Sir Francis Walsingham ran a postal interception bureau with some cryptanalytic capability during the reign of Elizabeth I, but the technology was only slightly less advanced than men with shotguns, during World War I, who jammed pigeon post communications and intercepted the messages carried.

FBI Index

Custodial Detention IndexGeneral Intelligence DivisionSecurity Index
The program involved creation of individual dossiers from secretly obtained information, including unsubstantiated data and in some cases, even hearsay and unsolicited phone tips, and information acquired without judicial warrants by mail covers and interception of mail, wiretaps and covert searches.