Posttraumatic stress disorder

post-traumatic stress disorderPTSDpost traumatic stress disorderpost-traumatic stresspost-traumatic stress syndromepost traumatic stresspost traumatic stress syndromepost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)posttraumatic stressbattle fatigue
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to a traumatic event, such as sexual assault, warfare, traffic collisions, child abuse, or other threats on a person's life.wikipedia
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Psychological trauma

traumatraumatizedtraumatic
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to a traumatic event, such as sexual assault, warfare, traffic collisions, child abuse, or other threats on a person's life. Symptoms may include disturbing thoughts, feelings, or dreams related to the events, mental or physical distress to trauma-related cues, attempts to avoid trauma-related cues, alterations in how a person thinks and feels, and an increase in the fight-or-flight response.
However, it is possible for some people to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after being exposed to a major traumatic event.

Sexual assault

sexually assaultedsexually assaultingsexually assault
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to a traumatic event, such as sexual assault, warfare, traffic collisions, child abuse, or other threats on a person's life.
The effects of child sexual abuse include depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, propensity to re-victimization in adulthood, physical injury to the child, and increased risk for future interpersonal violence perpetration among males, among other problems.

Mental disorder

mental illnessnervous breakdownmentally ill
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to a traumatic event, such as sexual assault, warfare, traffic collisions, child abuse, or other threats on a person's life.
Commonly recognized categories include specific phobias, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Rape

rapingrapistraped
People who experience interpersonal trauma such as rape or child abuse are more likely to develop PTSD as compared to people who experience non-assault based trauma, such as accidents and natural disasters.
People who have been raped can be traumatized and develop posttraumatic stress disorder.

Self-harm

self-mutilationself-injuryself harm
A person with PTSD is at a higher risk for suicide and intentional self-harm.
People with other mental disorders may also self-harm, including those with depression, anxiety disorders, substance abuse, eating disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, and dissociative disorders.

Child abuse

abuseabusiveabused
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to a traumatic event, such as sexual assault, warfare, traffic collisions, child abuse, or other threats on a person's life. People who experience interpersonal trauma such as rape or child abuse are more likely to develop PTSD as compared to people who experience non-assault based trauma, such as accidents and natural disasters.
Effects of child sexual abuse on the victim(s) include guilt and self-blame, flashbacks, nightmares, insomnia, fear of things associated with the abuse (including objects, smells, places, doctor's visits, etc.), self-esteem difficulties, sexual dysfunction, chronic pain, addiction, self-injury, suicidal ideation, somatic complaints, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, other mental illnesses including borderline personality disorder and dissociative identity disorder, propensity to re-victimization in adulthood, bulimia nervosa, and physical injury to the child, among other problems.

Shell shock

shell-shockshell-shockedshellshock
During the World Wars, the condition was known under various terms including "shell shock" and "combat neurosis".
Shell shock is a term coined in World War I by British psychologist Charles Samuel Myers to describe the type of posttraumatic stress disorder many soldiers were afflicted with during the war (before PTSD was termed).

Suicide

suicidalcommitted suicidesuicides
A person with PTSD is at a higher risk for suicide and intentional self-harm.
War veterans have a higher risk of suicide due in part to higher rates of mental illness, such as post traumatic stress disorder, and physical health problems related to war.

Acute stress disorder

shockacute stress reactionstate of shock
While it is common to have symptoms after any traumatic event, these must persist to a sufficient degree (i.e., causing dysfunction in life or clinical levels of distress) for longer than one month after the trauma to be classified as PTSD (clinically significant dysfunction or distress for less than one month after the trauma may be acute stress disorder).
Acute stress disorder is not fatal, but it may bring about delayed stress reactions (better known as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD) if not correctly addressed.

Domestic violence

domestic abusespousal abuseabusive
An individual that has been exposed to domestic violence is predisposed to the development of PTSD.
Victims may experience severe psychological disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

Major depressive disorder

depressionclinical depressionmajor depression
PTSD causes biochemical changes in the brain and body, that differ from other psychiatric disorders such as major depression.
Post-traumatic stress disorder and depression often co-occur.

War

warfarearmed conflictconflict
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to a traumatic event, such as sexual assault, warfare, traffic collisions, child abuse, or other threats on a person's life.
Military personnel subject to combat in war often suffer mental and physical injuries, including depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, disease, injury, and death.

Anhedonia

anhedonicinability to experience pleasurelack of deriving enjoyment
Dopamine levels in a person with PTSD can contribute to symptoms: low levels can contribute to anhedonia, apathy, impaired attention, and motor deficits; high levels can contribute to psychosis, agitation, and restlessness.
Anhedonia has also been used to refer to "affective blunting", "restricted range of affect", "emotional numbing", and "flat affect", particularly in the context of post-traumatic stress disorders.

Psychosis

psychoticpsychosespsychotic break
Dopamine levels in a person with PTSD can contribute to symptoms: low levels can contribute to anhedonia, apathy, impaired attention, and motor deficits; high levels can contribute to psychosis, agitation, and restlessness.

Psychomotor agitation

agitationrestlessnessexcitement
Dopamine levels in a person with PTSD can contribute to symptoms: low levels can contribute to anhedonia, apathy, impaired attention, and motor deficits; high levels can contribute to psychosis, agitation, and restlessness.

Posttraumatic growth

post-traumatic growthbenefit findingPost traumatic growth
Some following a traumatic event experience posttraumatic growth.
For example, Southwick and Charney, in a study of 250 prisoners of war from Vietnam, showed that participants developed much lower rates of depression and PTSD symptoms than expected.

Extinction (psychology)

extinctionextinction learningdisappearance
The amygdalocentric model of PTSD proposes that the amygdala is very much aroused and insufficiently controlled by the medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, in particular during extinction.
Many anxiety disorders such as post traumatic stress disorder are believed to reflect, at least in part, a failure to extinguish conditioned fear.

Antidepressant

antidepressantsanti-depressantanti-depressants
Antidepressants of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor type are the first-line medications for PTSD and result in benefit in about half of people.
MAOIs have been found to be effective in the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia, social phobia, atypical depression or mixed anxiety and depression, bulimia, and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as borderline personality disorder.

Intrusive thought

intrusive thoughtscertain thoughts repeatedlyintrusive imagery
Obsessive compulsive disorder may be diagnosed for intrusive thoughts that are recurring but not related to a specific traumatic event.
Intrusive thoughts may also be associated with episodic memory, unwanted worries or memories from OCD, posttraumatic stress disorder, other anxiety disorders, eating disorders, or psychosis.

Cognitive processing therapy

cognitive processing therapies
The approaches with the strongest evidence include behavioral and cognitive-behavioral therapies such as prolonged exposure therapy, cognitive processing therapy, and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR).
Cognitive processing therapy (CPT) is a manualized therapy used by clinicians to help people recover from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and related conditions.

Anxiety disorder

anxiety disordersanxietynervous disorder
PTSD was classified as an anxiety disorder in the DSM-IV, but has since been reclassified as a "trauma- and stressor-related disorder" in the DSM-5.
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) research began with Vietnam veterans, as well as natural and non natural disaster victims.

Complex post-traumatic stress disorder

complex PTSDcomplex traumacomplex posttraumatic stress disorder
In extreme cases of prolonged, repeated traumatization where there is no viable chance of escape, survivors may develop complex post-traumatic stress disorder.
Some researchers believe that C-PTSD is distinct from, but similar to, PTSD, somatization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and borderline personality disorder.

Dream

dreamsdreamlikedreaming
Symptoms may include disturbing thoughts, feelings, or dreams related to the events, mental or physical distress to trauma-related cues, attempts to avoid trauma-related cues, alterations in how a person thinks and feels, and an increase in the fight-or-flight response.
Therapy for recurring nightmares (often associated with posttraumatic stress disorder) can include imagining alternative scenarios that could begin at each step of the dream.

Critical incident stress management

well-being
Critical incident stress management has been suggested as a means of preventing PTSD, but subsequent studies suggest the likelihood of its producing negative outcomes.
Its purpose is to enable people to return to their daily routine more quickly and with less likelihood of experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Sertraline

ZoloftLustralSertraline Hydrochloride
Evidence provides support for a small or modest improvement with sertraline, fluoxetine, paroxetine, and venlafaxine.
It is used to treat major depressive disorder, obsessive–compulsive disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and social anxiety disorder.